• You must now select Courier Delivery if you wish to receive items before Christmas.
 
Page: 123
onewheeldave
GOLD Member since Aug 2002

Carpal \'Tunnel
Location: sheffield, United Kingdom

Total posts: 3252
Posted:It's 2005 and time for my annual thread recommending Allen Carrs book-

'Easy Way to Give up Smoking'

For anyone who's not had success with the usual methods.

It was early on in 2000 when I put out my final cigarette, after around 10 years of failed attempts. Which means I'm coming up to 5 years with no nicotine whatsoever.

So, for anyone who's on a New Years Resolution and attempting to quit using willpower, patches etc, the best of luck to you, and, if it doesn't work out, then don't fall into despair- check out Carrs excellent book.

It does seem unlikely that escaping nicotine addiction can be easy, and perhaps 'easy' isn't the best word to use; nevertheless, as someone who has managed it, I think I'm well placed to say that escaping does not have to be anywhere near the ordeal that people usually insist it will be.

I should say that I've known a lot of people walk away from addiction using Carrs method, however a lot of them become complacent and neglect to follow the simple, but strict, instructions in the book, and, six months later they end up having 'just one', which generally leads to them starting again.

In a way it's an advantage to have had a lot of failed quitting attempts under your belt, as then you can truly appreciate the value of achieving a state of mind where you are free from cigarettes, and thus less inclined to mess around with those very straightforward instructions.


"You can't outrun Death forever.
But you can make the Bastard work for it."

--MAJOR KORGO KORGAR,
"Last of The Lancers"
AFC 32


Educate your self in the Hazards of Fire Breathing STAY SAFE!

Delete Topic

newgabe
SILVER Member since Mar 2005

newgabe

what goes around comes around. unless you're into stalls.
Location: Bali, Australia

Total posts: 4030
Posted:Ok so now into my third day... not even thinking about smokes to be honest, tidied up the kids' pouch this morning and didn't feel the slightest interest. More yecch that I have a sore back and achey joints, stuffed up ear and vertigo. Which is probably more to do with gross lack of exercise these last weeks, since doing a double shift on a crappy chair a few weeks ago that threw my back out, and fighting off a flu ( my flatmates have vertigo too and they haven't quit smoking....) oooohhhhh poor me!!!
Re cutting down: I am a light smoker... maybe 5-8 very skinny rollies in a day, of which i would smoke about half before I put it out. So I don't get HUGE withdrawals, and have often given up for periods of time (longest =16 years!!!!) It's the staying off of course that is the hard. When you've forgotten how crappy it can make you feel!

Thanks for the support!
Have found an online version of the Carr book so will explore that when I feel like more than minimal computer engagement!


.....Can't juggle balls but I sure as hell can juggle details....

Delete

SickpuPpy


SickpuPpy

Ninja Rockstar!
Location: Denver, Co. U.S.A.

Total posts: 1100
Posted:I've noticed that the largest issue that people have whilst trying to quit smoking cold turkey is that they rarely actually "quit".

They keep making exceptions of why they can have one here and there, or they bum drags off people around them, as if it didn't count.

My Dad, and my brother quit cold turkey, and it worked for them because they just *quit*. They didn't screw around with exceptions or excuses they just *stopped*.

I can't even count the number of my friends who've pulled a lit cigarette out of my hand for a drag, and upon me asking "didn't you quit?" they invariably reply "yeah, I quit a while ago. I just wanted a drag..."

Well guess what folks?

That's not quitting,
That just you fooling yourself!


Jesus helps me trick people.

Delete

newgabe
SILVER Member since Mar 2005

newgabe

what goes around comes around. unless you're into stalls.
Location: Bali, Australia

Total posts: 4030
Posted:I borrowed a copy of Allen Carr's book from the local library and to be honest I'm a bit underwhelmed with it. It spends a lot of time telling me how good the system is, and what it's 'not' going to tell me (obvious stuff like nictoine is highly addictive and ashtrays smell bad) But I never really found out what the 'system' actually is, apart from cold turkey, and calling yourself as a 'happy non smoker' rather than a 'suffering deprived smoker'. Fair enough: basic reframing strategy, followed by an absolute insistence never to touch another. (Familiar from any serious anti-addiction program eg AA) Not saying this isn't a perfectly good system, it'shis note of self congratulation that really grates with me...



I am also perplexed at his assertion that there are no withdrawal symptoms after the first half hour.. or that if they are, these 'symptoms' are the same as hunger.. "empty, insecure". Eh? No they're not. I don't get the sort of weird feelings in my mouth, the pressure and pain spasms in my head, etc when I'm hungry. I get hungry, in my tummy.



I agree that these experiences are not overwhelmingly painful (I've had babies), but neither are they non existent. They are very insistent and go on for quite a while... I can redefine them as 'cravings' or 'symptoms' or 'cleansing experiences' or 'karma' or 'learning experiences'. Accept that this is the price I pay for being an addict in the first place. And make a choice to not 'relieve' them giving myself more of the same substance that caused them. Good, but hardly new. But maybe spinners already realise you don't put out fire with kerosene! (hmmm hang on, some people dunk wicks to put them out.. cancel that!)



So why does this chap rate himself so highly that he's discovered something revolutionary??? "I'm the first person to understand smoking" etcetc. And he really bags willpower... Yet to continually make a choice to redefine what is happening, to provide an alternative inner dialogue to 'I feel crappy therefore I'll smoke" IS the power of will.. or willpower. And then he reiterates that smokers are pathetic by telling you he's not going to say that! Most annoying.



Still not smoking though. It brings on hot flushes.


.....Can't juggle balls but I sure as hell can juggle details....

Delete

ed209


ed209

Ed: geek, staffer, past participle
Location: London, UK

Total posts: 122
Posted:Keep at it newgabe! Grrrr...

Maybe try thinking about all the good things that are happening at the same time as the withdrawal symptoms.

For example, you're almost a week in. By now, you have cleared the nicotine and carbon monoxide from your body. Your lungs are well into the business of clearing themselves of remaining gunk, and your circulation is starting to improve. smile Go you.


Delete

onewheeldave
GOLD Member since Aug 2002

Carpal \'Tunnel
Location: sheffield, United Kingdom

Total posts: 3252
Posted:The perspective on withdrawal symptoms is that they do exist, but are fundamentally mild, if you don't add to them.



What happens with most quitting smokers is that they (unintentionally of course) transform the mild craving into uncontrollable panges that nag and whittle away their intention to quit, often leading to them 'breaking' and having a cigarette.



This is caused by their distorted understanding of why they smoked in the first place (eg because they though it was enjoyable, or that it relaxed them), and by indecision (despite their decision to quit, they are plagued by thoughts that they can perhaps have 'just one' etc).



Carrs method of dealing with this is not



Written by: newgabe


calling yourself as a 'happy non smoker' rather than a 'suffering deprived smoker'







as that would of course not be effective.



Rather, it's about understanding the true nature of cravings so fully, that when a craving arises, instead of engaging with and adding to it, you recognise it for what it is- a mild symptom of nicotine addiction that will pass (if you don't add to it).



You don't merely call yourself a 'happy non-smoker' you are one; because, in contrast to previous attemps which were all about iron willpower and deprivation, you are walking away from smoking with no cravings and feeling anything but deprived.



One who fully understands the Carr method cannot feel deprived, because they now see smoking as something which is entirely undesirable and which has no good qualities or benefits.



It's also about not torturing yourself by debating whether or not to light up- on Carrs method, you understand why the 'benefits' of smoking are illusory, you see why you were trapped and the way out of the trap; then you quit, for good.



There is no need to debate with yourself about whether or not to light up, the decision has been made; so, when that thought 'it would be nice to have one...' appears, you simply acknowledge it and then let it go- you do not engage in internal debate with it.



Thus, the craving dissolves almost as soon as it arises.



This is not 'cold turkey' as cold turkey is heavily associated with great distress, immense willpower and the principle of enduring deprivation (until, hopefully, weeks/months down the line, the addiction ends).



Carrs method does not use willpower and there is no fighting withdrawal symptoms; quite simply, if you're fighting withdrawal symptoms, you've misunderstood the approach.



-------------------



Many people cannot relate to Carrs method- they find his approach to be arrogant and dogmatic.



I can fully understand this, i had the same thoughts myself when I first read it.



After many, many, many attempts to use modified versions and conventional methods; and watching the failed attempts of many others, I came to see the wisdom in Carrs approach.



From your description of what you feel after reading the book, I can confirm that, for you at this point in time, Carrs method will not work for you; you simply have not understood what he is saying.



IMO, your best approach is to continue using your current quitting method, hopefully it will work (and I really hope it does- good luck with it).



If it does fail, just be aware that Carrs book is still out there, and it does tend to look more convincing after several attempts using conventional methods have failed.



Lastly, if you do succeed in quittting for six months or so, I urge you to at least take one of Carrs guidelines very seriously, and do not ever have a drag on a cigarette- 'just one' really is the biggest cause for otherwise good attempts to fail.



(and, if you smoke spliffs with tobacco in, then stop, because nicotine is nicotine, whatever it's wrapped in).



And that's not just Carr talking, I've seen it so many times- people are just total suckers for it- they've been off cigs for a month, or six months, or even six years; then they get a craving and thing they can have 'just one', or it's a time of one-off celebration, or a time of great stress, or they've got a bit drunk.



The one thing that a nicotine addict cannot handle, is 'just one'.



If you quit, stay quit.



good luck.


"You can't outrun Death forever.
But you can make the Bastard work for it."

--MAJOR KORGO KORGAR,
"Last of The Lancers"
AFC 32


Educate your self in the Hazards of Fire Breathing STAY SAFE!

Delete

newgabe
SILVER Member since Mar 2005

newgabe

what goes around comes around. unless you're into stalls.
Location: Bali, Australia

Total posts: 4030
Posted:Yep, fair enough OWD. Though it sounds a bit like 'if you don't like the way Carr puts things, then his method won't work ie you will not be able to stop.' Hmmmm. Maybe not so. I don't think anything Carr has said is wrong, new or different. It's all good. I just don't like the way he claims it's 'his' and revolutionary! But good on him if that sort of marketing gets people thinking in ways they haven't previously.. I'm just a jaded old muppet who has to practice what I know to be true!!!

I totally 'get' the idea of observing sensation, and letting it pass, without adding to it... this is how I have dealt with many years of chronic pain... (which I now no longer experience.) I can experience this few week's weird feelings in the mouth, creepy 'just the one' thought patterns etc 'as is'. I could call them cravings (and obsess on fags, building fags up as a saviour) Or see them simply 'adjustments'.. they are my body saying 'where's that weird substance that you used to give me every day'.

Similarly, I 'get' the choice to create indecision and internal splitting: or value the transient lessons about the true nature of the little green man. Buddhism 101!
As I said above, this is what I think of as 'will' (I accept I use the word differently to many people...) Observing honestly and making internal choices to NOT split into internal battles. I wouldn't even know how to 'fight' sensations! apart from 'not buying into them'.

And never to have that first 'next' one? RIght on brother...AA 101! That, like so many others, is where I have fallen over before. Not the getting off,the staying off.

Meanwhile, at the moment, I don't feel 'deprived' of tobacco at all... I am very happy to be on the way out of the 'trap'. It was interesting today to walk past the smokers huddled outside office buildings and really see the junkieness of it. (Thank you Mr Carr for helping de-normalise it...)

SO OWD, thanks for engaging in discussion and for your obvious concern, for your 'annual posting!' I think you describe a helpful process more effectively than he does!
Cheers
Gabe


.....Can't juggle balls but I sure as hell can juggle details....

Delete

onewheeldave
GOLD Member since Aug 2002

Carpal \'Tunnel
Location: sheffield, United Kingdom

Total posts: 3252
Posted:Written by: newgabe

I don't think anything Carr has said is wrong, new or different. It's all good. I just don't like the way he claims it's 'his' and revolutionary! But good on him if that sort of marketing gets people thinking in ways they haven't previously.. I'm just a jaded old muppet who has to practice what I know to be true!!!

I totally 'get' the idea of observing sensation, and letting it pass, without adding to it... this is how I have dealt with many years of chronic pain... (which I now no longer experience.)....

...Similarly, I 'get' the choice to create indecision and internal splitting: or value the transient lessons about the true nature of the little green man. Buddhism 101!






That's very interesting, it sounds like in your case you pretty much developed the attitude which Carr is talking about through other experiences, which would explain why you don't consider it that radical.

To me, that ability to 'not attach' was something that I'd heard about (through buddhism etc) but never 'got' till I read Carrs book, and which didn't become fully integrated until I'd successfully used it to quit smoking.

Since then, that abiltiy and understanding has got me through plenty of stuff that, previously, I would not have dealt with so well.

So I guess that's why I rate Carrs work as being so innovative. I think that goes for a lot of others as well- many of those who read the book and successfully quit do see it as a radical and different approach, and tend to rave about it and recommend it to their friends.

When you consider that the majority of would-be quitters are still stuck in the NHS smoking helpline mentality of 'cutting down gradually' and buying nicotine gum/patches; it's easy to see why the Carr approach can look like such a quantum leap.

None of that is disagreeing with you, I'm just suggesting that maybe you got so little from Carrs book because you've already used similar techniques and understandings in other areas of your life.



Written by: newgabe

As I said above, this is what I think of as 'will' (I accept I use the word differently to many people...) Observing honestly and making internal choices to NOT split into internal battles. I wouldn't even know how to 'fight' sensations! apart from 'not buying into them'.





Yes, that is a different use; when Carr talks about 'willpower' he's talking about dealing with the craving by brute force of will.

ie not using subtle 'dissolving' methods like it sounds you do, which prevent the craving developing into something that ultimately compels the quitter to light up.

Traditionally, 'willpower' was seen as essential to quitting, and, in Carrs eyes, that idea is one of the 'myths of quitting' that actually ensure that most attempts end in failure.

ie the attitude of 'grin and bear it', the belief that the smoker must endure weeks or months of misery and cravings.

Carrs approach simply sidesteps all that by cutting off the craving at its source (the smokers own misunderstanding) before it even develops into a feeling that requires 'fighting' against.

Again, if that's how you naturally deal with unwanted thoughts/feelings; then you won't see it as a particularly innovative approach- but many would-be quitters do not have your insight.

============

Written by: newgabe

SO OWD, thanks for engaging in discussion and for your obvious concern, for your 'annual posting!' I think you describe a helpful process more effectively than he does!
Cheers
Gabe



Nice of you to say so smile

And thanks for posting your opinions; I do very much like to think that by passing on info, that others can find a way out of smoking and reap the same benefits I did by doing so.

As such, the opinions of those who read Carrs book and don't really think much of it, are really useful to hear.

It will be interesting to hear if you agree or disagree with some of what I've written above.


"You can't outrun Death forever.
But you can make the Bastard work for it."

--MAJOR KORGO KORGAR,
"Last of The Lancers"
AFC 32


Educate your self in the Hazards of Fire Breathing STAY SAFE!

Delete

tadpole
GOLD Member since Nov 2002

enthusiast
Location: Harare, Zimbabwe, United Kingd...

Total posts: 200
Posted:I'm just starting my third week with out a smoke. My method of choice hs been cold turkey, although I have started putting a bit of tobacco with my spliff. In contrast to you, OWD, I see this as a release, as I smoke spliff far less often than I used to smoke cigarettes. I see how you say that this could lead to my downfall, but the small amount I use, and the lack of regularity with which it's used don't cause me any concern.

I reckon the biggest problem I've faced is that I actually liked cigarettes. Sure, it had got to the point where I wasn't smoking for enjoyment anymore, at least most of the time, but one thing I've noticed is that nobody ever remarks on the good points. Agreed, before I get screamed at, that cigarettes' bad points outweigh their good points by vast distances, but any smoker will tell you that the first smoke after breakfast, the one with coffee, etc, can actually be a very enjoyable experience.

Saying that, still glad I've quit.


Don't worry, be happy...

Delete

onewheeldave
GOLD Member since Aug 2002

Carpal \'Tunnel
Location: sheffield, United Kingdom

Total posts: 3252
Posted:The thing is tadpole, that the path to tobacco addiction almost always starts from the belief that one's tobacco use is OK because it is so small.



I don't think anyone gets up one day and decides to start smoking 40 cigarettes a day- it's generally just the occasional one, which then ends up as 3-a-day, then 5, then 10 etc, etc.



Good luck though, maybe you should post back in a couple of months and give us a progress report.


"You can't outrun Death forever.
But you can make the Bastard work for it."

--MAJOR KORGO KORGAR,
"Last of The Lancers"
AFC 32


Educate your self in the Hazards of Fire Breathing STAY SAFE!

Delete

quiet


quiet

analytic
Location: bristol

Total posts: 503
Posted:i started smoking cigarettes after I was introduced to tobacco in spliffs. it's tobacco, it contains nicotine, and it's addictive. duh.

ture na sig

Delete

newgabe
SILVER Member since Mar 2005

newgabe

what goes around comes around. unless you're into stalls.
Location: Bali, Australia

Total posts: 4030
Posted:Well, my progress report is all good. I also went to my chinese doctor for my annual pre-winter ckeckup and told him I quit. The look of joy on his face was a great reinforcement and he gave me some herbs to rid the nicotine out quickly... strong withdrawals the next few days, now almost nothing really. .I am not at all tempted or interested by my flatmates smoking. (it seems silly and a bit sad)
I have listened to more Allen Carr audio and reread parts of the book. I don't like the chap's style any more than I did, and could continue to nit pick, but there are lots of bits I have found helpful and relate to. I do think however he seriously underplays the withdrawal experiences people have when cutting cold. I have great sympathy for people who had a heavier habit than mine to cut from (surely they would have bigger withdrawals?) Constantly reframing the screamings of the 'little monster' in to the 'euphoria' of the happy non smoker could be very time consuming!

Haven't had to deal with the 'hanging out with the mates I used to have lots of rollies or spliffies with' thing yet. When I was a non smoker for 16 years I used to make very skinny spliffs using of peppermint tea. Worked fine! Thanks for your support OWD.
btw.. are you involved in FWBO? I recognise the avatar....


.....Can't juggle balls but I sure as hell can juggle details....

Delete

onewheeldave
GOLD Member since Aug 2002

Carpal \'Tunnel
Location: sheffield, United Kingdom

Total posts: 3252
Posted:Written by: newgabe


I have listened to more Allen Carr audio and reread parts of the book. I don't like the chap's style any more than I did, and could continue to nit pick, but there are lots of bits I have found helpful and relate to. I do think however he seriously underplays the withdrawal experiences people have when cutting cold. I have great sympathy for people who had a heavier habit than mine to cut from (surely they would have bigger withdrawals?) Constantly reframing the screamings of the 'little monster' in to the 'euphoria' of the happy non smoker could be very time consuming!




Carr reckons that in many ways, those who have a heavy smoking habit actually have it easier than those who smoke, say, 5-a-day.

As a smoker he was on 120-a-day and had no doubt that his habit would kill him- despite this all his quitting atempts led to unbearable cravings and eventual failure.

Until he had his 'insight', at which point he quit, full-stop, remained free of cravings, and stayed quit.

Once he'd had his insight, and seen fully the workings of the smoking trap, he could walk away from it easily.

The fact that his habit (120-a-day) was so bad, meant that the negative effects of smoking were very obvious (his health was bad, he smelt etc, etc) so there was way less tendency to reminis over imagined 'positive' aspects.

Whereas the 5-a-day smoker doesn't really reap the health/smell consequences to the same obvious extent, so they may have to dig a little deeper to not fall into their old ways (of seeing positive aspects to smoking).

I can relate to that, as, during my last year of smoking, I hated every cigarette and had no illusions that I was smoking for the taste, or for relaxation etc.

I knew that the only reason I was smoking was compulsion/addiction, and having to do it 20-30 times a day (not as extreme a habit as Carrs, but nonetheless quite high) was upsetting.


"You can't outrun Death forever.
But you can make the Bastard work for it."

--MAJOR KORGO KORGAR,
"Last of The Lancers"
AFC 32


Educate your self in the Hazards of Fire Breathing STAY SAFE!

Delete

onewheeldave
GOLD Member since Aug 2002

Carpal \'Tunnel
Location: sheffield, United Kingdom

Total posts: 3252
Posted:Written by: newgabe
Thanks for your support OWD.
btw.. are you involved in FWBO? I recognise the avatar....



That's OK smile

Cheers for posting your quitting experiences; hopefully it will inspire others to have a go.

The avatar is a tibetan 'digital prayer wheel' that I downloaded from a webpage.

The page was quite amusing in that it was based on the principle that a digital prayer wheel would, in theory, be more effective than a physical one, as it would be held on a hard drive which obviously spins much, much faster than any physical prayer wheel could.

I used it as my avatar because it looked nice, and because I have lot of respect for buddhist teachings and ways of being.

Are you a buddhist?


"You can't outrun Death forever.
But you can make the Bastard work for it."

--MAJOR KORGO KORGAR,
"Last of The Lancers"
AFC 32


Educate your self in the Hazards of Fire Breathing STAY SAFE!

Delete

Hairy Tait
BRONZE Member since Aug 2004

Hairy Tait

member
Location: Back in the Future, United Kin...

Total posts: 109
Posted:Have to Agree.... This is a marvellous book.....

I used it to stop two years ago......

However.... I had stopped for about 9 months and had a really bad day one day..couple that with being ever so slightly drunk and i stupidly had a cigrette........!!

I started again for about 6 months..stopped again in November last year and ultra-stupidly started again whilst on My travels in India two months ago.......!!!

Having said all that...i have to say it's a brilliant book that really works if you have the good sense not to touch the evil weed again.....


Perhaps what i've just said doen't make that much sense.....me still being a smoker and all that....but i'm a fool who started again when i didn't actually feel the need to smoke at all....









It really is a good book........


It's a very interesting story, Future Boy....!

Delete

onewheeldave
GOLD Member since Aug 2002

Carpal \'Tunnel
Location: sheffield, United Kingdom

Total posts: 3252
Posted:I did the same when I used the book for the first time, it's a very real danger and I've seen many people fall into the same trap of, having quit successfully, having one cigarette thinking that they won't get addicted again.



Having reached a point several years later where the horrific realisation dawned that, just like my parents, I could well spend the rest of my life as a helplessly addicted smoker, I came to realise what a rare, and fragile, gift it is to be in a state where you truly can stay off nicotine for ever.



That's why, on my successful final quit five years ago, when I realised I'd succeeded I made a firm resolution to not take it for granted, and not to engage in acts that would bring the risk of getting addicted again, ie never under any circumstances to have 'just one drag', and also to refrain from the thought patterns that I knew could lead to me having 'just one..'.



More than anyhting, I would urge anyone who does stay quit for several months, using whatever method, to stick to that one simple and very basic principle- do not risk your acheivement by having a drag.



I'm not saying it's impossible to have one cigarette, and then stay quit; but, in my experience, it's the single most effective way to ruin the quit attempt.



Think of it like this; if you've quit, and you never again put a cigarette in your mouth, then you'll stay quit, 100% guaranteed.



That is not the case if you do put a cigarette in your mouth; not only is the 100% guarantee gone, but, in my experience, you'll very likely end up with the smoking habit again.


"You can't outrun Death forever.
But you can make the Bastard work for it."

--MAJOR KORGO KORGAR,
"Last of The Lancers"
AFC 32


Educate your self in the Hazards of Fire Breathing STAY SAFE!

Delete

mo-seph


mo-seph

enthusiast
Location: Edinburgh, UK

Total posts: 524
Posted:I managed to give up about 3 years back; didn't use any books or anything, but moving into a non-smoking house with 2 other people who were quitting really helped.

My experience (having given up for periods before) was that it's either easy or impossible. I find it hard to do willpower constantly every day, which was why I failed before. When I gave up, it was a case of

- really disliking smoking
- flicking a little switch in my head that says "I'm a smoker". don't really know how that works, but there's definitely a different mindset between "I've given up smoking" and "I don't smoke", and it was definitely the key for me.

Not smoking ever ever ever is essential. Although the few times I have had nicotine accidentally (yup, really accidentatlly, not "I can just have a quick drag") I've felt quite ill from it, so it was easy not to start again - although I did think about it for a couple of days afterwards. If you carry on smoking spliffs, you'll end up really stoned to feed the nicotine habbit...

(That said, I happily smoked shishas with mint and apple tobacco, and they rocked biggrin )

Good luck to everyone trying; it's well worth it!
hug


monkeys ate my brain

Delete

Moohaahaa
BRONZE Member since Mar 2002

Moohaahaa

enthusiast
Location: In Ger Land, India

Total posts: 382
Posted:What interesting timing.

I have been a non-smoker for the massive time of 6 days now.
Doesn't sound like long, but it's my first proper attempt at giving up, and I feel like it will be succesful.

It all started when i got to a festival in kent two weeks ago. I decided upon arrival that I didn't fancy being stoned from the moment I woke up until I went to sleep, so I stopped that and just smoked cigarettes.

Then after about 5 days of that, I just thought 'WTF am I smoking cigarettes for?'
They're rubbish and expensive and kill me in an extra special way because I have had asthma all my life.
Addiction is very odd though. I thought I needed cigarettes to be relaxed or to feel safe or something, but I realised that I don't really believe that.

I was really interested in how I'll feel when there's no more nicotene in my system, I don't know how long that takes, maybe it's happened already, and my cravings are just psychological??

The hardest thing was waking up and saying to myself "never again," it really was impossible to believe at first, but with each passing day I believe it more and more. I've already done most of the things I associate with smoking, ie going to a pub, going to a gig, eating a meal, having sex, waking up, and generally being alive, and they're all still the same now I don't smoke,

10 years of smoking is enough I reckon, so I'll leave it at that smile


Some things you have to see to believe, but
Some things you have to believe in to see.

Delete

Tao Star


Tao Star

Pooh-Bah
Location: Bristol

Total posts: 1662
Posted:ah Jonny, i wish i could give up. but i just can't be botheres with will power and all that stuff.


i thought about it, but as soon as i though about it in relation to my actual life now, i just couldn't pictue it actually happening. i genuinely don't belive that i want to give up. if want to, i reackon i could do it though.


i guess that's addiction. frown


I had a dream that my friend had a
strong-bad pop up book,
it was the book of my dreams.

Delete

Spanner
BRONZE Member since Feb 2003

Spanner

remembers when it was all fields round here
Location: in the works... somewhere..., ...

Total posts: 2790
Posted: Written by: onewheeldave


...recommending Allen Carrs book-

'Easy Way to Give up Smoking'



Didn't know whether this merited it's own thread as this one is a general discussion of his main work.

Allen Carr dies from lung cancer

frown

I gave up on the 23rd of December last year after reading this book and haven't smoked since smile

Apparently I am one of 10 million people he has helped! so we have a lot to thank him for and I hope he rests in peace.

 Written by: John Dicey, worldwide director of Allen Carr's Easyway

The fact that a former 100-a-day smoker, having quit in his middle age, lived to the ripe old age of 72 is a tremendous message to all smokers.



"I thought you are man, but
you are nice woman.

yay,

:R"

Delete

onewheeldave
GOLD Member since Aug 2002

Carpal \'Tunnel
Location: sheffield, United Kingdom

Total posts: 3252
Posted:frown frown frown frown frown

I had heard that he'd got lung cancer, but didn't know he'd died.

 Written by: news.bbc.co.uk



He said: "Given that I am informed that I have cured at least 10 million smokers on a conservative estimation, even if that is the case, it's a price worth paying."




It's good to go out knowing that the world is a better place than when you came in.

 Written by: news.bbc.co.uk



"Allen Carr's refreshingly different approach to stopping smoking earned him the position as the world's leading expert on helping smokers to quit."




"You can't outrun Death forever.
But you can make the Bastard work for it."

--MAJOR KORGO KORGAR,
"Last of The Lancers"
AFC 32


Educate your self in the Hazards of Fire Breathing STAY SAFE!

Delete

Nonky


Nonky

member
Location: Belfast

Total posts: 44
Posted:I really need to get this book. I keep trying to stop tobacco and can be successful for a short period of time.

Then I have a wee spliff, then before I know it I am back full on smoking again!!

Is it possible to be too lazy to quit? wink


Delete

Helen_of_Poi
SILVER Member since Apr 2004

Helen_of_Poi

lapsed spinner
Location: Dublin, Ireland

Total posts: 412
Posted:That's a real shame frown

I quit just over 2 years ago - i had read the book a few months before that, and while i found it an extremely annoying piece of literature (didn't like his writing style at all), i really think that it helped me quit in the end.

I'm sure his book will continue to help people for a long time to come.


Helen_of_Poi

EJC Ireland 2006 Organisational Team

Delete

sagetree
GOLD Member since May 2006

sagetree

organic creation
Location: earth, Wales (UK)

Total posts: 246
Posted: Written by: An open letter to Tony Blair from Allen Carr 27/11/06



Dear Tony Blair,

Earlier this year I was given 6-9 months to live and am concerned about my legacy. It occurs to me that you are in a very similar position. We can help each other.


In 1983 I went from chain-smoker to non-smoker without suffering withdrawal pangs. It took no willpower. I immediately enjoyed social occasions more and was better able to handle stress. Ive never had the slightest desire to smoke since. Most importantly:


I realised I had discovered a method which can enable any smoker to quit easily, painlessly and permanently.


At the time I wrote to the Conservative government and the medical establishment offering to help address the number one killer disease: nicotine addiction. I was ignored as I lacked credibility.


Over 20 years later I have established my credibility. My books have sold over 10 million copies and I have a worldwide network of clinics where last year alone we treated over 45,000 smokers. The clinics provide a money back guarantee whereby smokers can reclaim their fee should they fail to quit for at least 3 months. Less than 10% find it necessary to reclaim their fee. Furthermore, published, independent, scientific studies have found that the success rate after 12 months is over 53%. No other method has results approaching these.


In spite of repeated formal approaches throughout 2004, 2005, & 2006, your Government, Department of Health, NHS, ASH, and QUIT have all have refused to even meet me let alone show an interest in my method.


It costs the taxpayer more than 400 to treat a smoker at the NHS Stop Smoking Clinics which use nicotine products, according to ASH they achieve a success rate of 20% after 12 months; i.e. a FAILIURE rate of 80%. The fee at my clinics is 220 and if smokers dont quit, it costs nothing.


I have not had the benefit of charitable donations, government funding or the vast wealth of the pharmaceutical industry to fund marketing campaigns. The success and fame of the method has been achieved through personal recommendations. I am now widely recognized as the worlds leading expert on helping smokers to quit for one reason alone:


MY METHOD WORKS

Your government still refuses to provide my method on the NHS. Its refusal even to evaluate the method was made through the National Institute for Clinical Excellence (NICE) presumably under the influence of the pharmaceutical industry which sells nicotine via so-called Nicotine Replacement Therapy (NRT) gums, patches, nasal sprays, inhalators, etc. NRT is a misnomer. Nicotine is not replaced, it is continued and theres nothing therapeutic about that.


YOU CANNOT CURE NICOTINE ADDICTION BY SUPPLYING NICOTINE!

The difficulty in stopping smoking is not the physical withdrawal. It is the feeling of deprivation smokers suffer because they believe they are making a sacrifice. Pills, patches or potions cannot solve this problem. My method does.


Your government, aided by the medical establishment, the NHS, ASH and QUIT, under the powerful influence of the pharmaceutical industry, is pouring hundreds of millions of pounds of taxpayers money each year into the pockets of the pharmaceutical companies which are, in effect, competing with the tobacco industry to supply the nicotine addicted market and perpetuate nicotine addiction.


THIS IS A NATIONAL SCANDAL

Smoking kills 50% of all smokers, currently over 5 million people a year. The World Health Organization predicts that this will rise to over 10 million by 2020.

Does that sound like the medical establishment have the situation under control?

The situation is out of control. Together we could ensure that Great Britain leads the world to a smoke-free future. What better legacy could we ask?

You, and anyone one else, can download my latest book SCANDAL, free of charge on www.allencarr.com

This is the book that the pharmaceuticals, the Department of Heath, the NHS, ASH, & QUIT will not want you to read.

Yours sincerely,

Allen Carr



Delete

Neon_Shaolin
GOLD Member since Jul 2005

Neon_Shaolin

hehe, 'Member' huhuh
Location: Behind you. With Jam

Total posts: 6120
Posted:I'm now on my FIFTH day without cigarettes and 'other'...



It's going well for now but I think I might need a bit of a help... I will check out this book but thanks for the warning about this rather grating style.



I think the problem for most people (myself included I'm ashamed to admit) is when smoking has been near enough ingrained into their whole identity - I AM A SMOKER that giving up smoking means that a part of them goes away...



I technique I've found that works so far is that when you feel like a cigarette you spend about 5mins concentrating on deep slow breathing. Which you come to find more satisfying than lungfulls of tobacco smoke...



The TRUE test is tonight when I go out clubbing... eek...


"I used to want to change the world, now I just wanna leave the room with a little dignity..." - Lotus Weinstock

Delete

Spanner
BRONZE Member since Feb 2003

Spanner

remembers when it was all fields round here
Location: in the works... somewhere..., ...

Total posts: 2790
Posted:I think people find his books "grating" or similar because they know it's all true wink

I couldn't argue with any of what he said despite his request to question anything he'd written.



I would say keep going but there's nothing to keep going because I don't believe willpower is the key.

It's easier not to pick up the baccy/whatever again than it is to go out of your way to, so as you don't spark another up, you're already a non-smoker smile



But by all means give the book a read and well done you clap



The smoking ban in England starts on the 1st of July 2007 anyway so... smile


"I thought you are man, but
you are nice woman.

yay,

:R"

Delete

Nonky


Nonky

member
Location: Belfast

Total posts: 44
Posted:I decided today to stop this stupidity of smoking tobacco.... My chest physcially hurts, its a smelly dirty habit and burning money away....


I imagine I will be rather grumpy and miserable over the next few days, but I am determined to give up for good.

Wish me luck eh? smile


Delete

faith enfire
BRONZE Member since Jan 2006

faith enfire

wandering thru the woods of WI
Location: Wisconsin, USA

Total posts: 3556
Posted:well, how did the smoke free clubbing go?

Faith
Nay, whatever comes one hour was sunlit and the most high gods may not make boast of any better thing than to have watched that hour as it passed

Delete

jeff(fake)


jeff(fake)

Scientist of Fortune
Location: Edinburgh

Total posts: 1189
Posted:I have a 50 bet on with an smoker that they couldn't quit cigarettes for a year starting January 1st. They figured it would help giving it up entirely if they had money riding on it. December 2nd and no smoke. It's looking bad for my money. wink

According to Heisenberg's Uncertainty Principle of Quantum Dynamics, we may already be making love right now...

Delete

Helen_of_Poi
SILVER Member since Apr 2004

Helen_of_Poi

lapsed spinner
Location: Dublin, Ireland

Total posts: 412
Posted: Written by: Spanner


I think people find his books "grating" or similar because they know it's all true wink




Personally, I just found it grating - the constant SAYING THINGS IN CAPITALS for emphasis and overuse of exclamation marks! drove me insane. Do we really need so many rhetorical questions? You can see examples of this in the piece that sagetree has posted above. A whole book worth of this kind of sensationalist writing really annoyed me. The only reason i did keep reading is because as you say, it's all true.

However, my annoyance did make me read it quickly just to be done with the whole exercise.

Best of luck to anyone quitting at the moment. hug It's not easy, but is so very worth it. Quitting is one of the achievements that i feel most proud of, because of its positive impact on my life. That may seem silly, to be proud of stopping doing something that I never should have done in the first place, but nonetheless, that's how i feel about it. I think one of the strengths of Carr's method is how it makes you think about how you started doing this in the first place - everyone's first cigarette is a pretty horrible experience, as children we almost all hate the smell, and yet we go out of our way to get used to it and spend lots of money on it.

 Written by: Spanner


It's easier not to pick up the baccy/whatever again than it is to go out of your way to




We tend to forget how much effort it is to be a smoker - all of the trips to the shop to get smokes, the effort to get a light (i remember lighting cigarettes off the cooker rings when i couldn't find anything else), checking through all the discarded boxes on the morning after parties in my flat to see if anyone has forgotten a cigarette or two...not to mention all of the standing about in the cold and the rain thanks to our Irish smoking ban. Smoking can cause as much stress as it seems to relieve (and i say "seems" for good reason) wink

I still have my copy of the book - hopefully i won't need it again smile so if anyone wants it, let me know.


Helen_of_Poi

EJC Ireland 2006 Organisational Team

Delete

faith enfire
BRONZE Member since Jan 2006

faith enfire

wandering thru the woods of WI
Location: Wisconsin, USA

Total posts: 3556
Posted:huh, i guess i'm not trying enough...though others have a hard time smoking...
for the most part easy come and easy go


Faith
Nay, whatever comes one hour was sunlit and the most high gods may not make boast of any better thing than to have watched that hour as it passed

Delete

Page: 123

Similar Topics

Using the keywords [smoking allen carr] we found the following similar topics.
1. Forums > Smoking- Allen Carr [67 replies]
2. Forums > should my friend quit smoking herbs? [19 replies]
3. Forums > the NEW smoking laws [103 replies]
4. Forums > Blowing off steam <smokers rant> [47 replies]
5. Forums > Smoking Poi [24 replies]

     Show more..