mech
BRONZE Member since Jun 2003

mech

Carpal \'Tunnel
Location: "In your ear", United Kingdom

Total posts: 6207
Posted:ok i know lots of diif counrtys in her and lots of diff cultures, but what tribal drums does you contry have?

were can i get one, how much, were is a good web site to buy them?

basically what drums do you have thread?

later days


Step (el-nombrie)

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UCOF
SILVER Member since Apr 2002

UCOF

Carpal \'Tunnel
Location: , United Kingdom

Total posts: 15414
Posted:weve got oil drums....

thats about the technicality of Englands drums

in Ireland they have BIG tambourines but without the belly things...they hit them with a two ended stick.

in comparison to a 1 ended stick i suppose.


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Kat
BRONZE Member since Dec 2000

Kat

Pooh-Bah
Location: London, Wales (UK)

Total posts: 2211
Posted:That would be the bodhran (pronounced bough ron)Jon The Swan in Stockwell holds bodhran classes

Japan have Taiko - de gung de gung de gung! They rock, if you can fing a class to join

Head along to the Stables in Camden, near the back of the market there are drumming classes in a shop there, beginners welcome.

If you are interested in Tabla or other Indian drums, post a message on a local noticeboard and you might be able to find a teacher.


Come faeries, take me out of this dull world, for I would ride with you upon the wind and dance upon the mountains like a flame.

- W B Yeats

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Moohaahaa
BRONZE Member since Mar 2002

Moohaahaa

enthusiast
Location: In Ger Land, India

Total posts: 382
Posted:I have two djembe drums. 1 is Remo and supremely badass, coutersy of Coleman + family. I also have a smaller one I just bought at Glastonbury.

But these are quite recent, for the past 8 years I've had a full drumkit in my garage. It has cymbals as well, and some pedals.

I'm not a country and theres only one of me, so it can't be tribal, but I thought I'd tell you anyway


Some things you have to see to believe, but
Some things you have to believe in to see.

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Pele
BRONZE Member since Dec 2000

Pele

the henna lady
Location: WNY, USA

Total posts: 6193
Posted:I am currently in possession of one of those said Bohdran drums. Love it. Not easy however.

I also have a Doumbek (small hand drum of Middle Eastern origins). Fun for many rhythms, good for all ages.

NAtive Americans have so many types of drums I can not even begin to touch on them all. One of the most interested comes from the South West Indians and it is called a water drum. Made from a (usually) cast iron pot with hide stretched across the top of it and tied down it has water inside it. When struck the water vibrates against the metal creating this awesome thudding (from the drum beat) with a resonating kind of hummy-you-have-to-hear-it-to-understand-it sound. Very rich in tone and all together transfixing.

Oooooohhhhh...Kat could you recommend some decent Taiko drum cd's? I fell in love with (spelling is soo off, forgive me!?) So Dai Ko, the Taiko troupe. My god I love the feel of those drums echoing through my spine!


Pele
Higher, higher burning fire...making music like a choir
"Oooh look! A pub!" -exclaimed after recovering from a stupid fall
"And for the decadence of art, nothing beats a roaring fire." -TMK

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DeepSoulSheep
GOLD Member since Sep 2002

DeepSoulSheep

Carpal \'Tunnel
Location: Berlin, Ireland

Total posts: 2617
Posted:Some of the most magnificent drumming I've ever heard was on oil drums Jon. Seriously the noise off them is insane. Plus loads of people can play them at the same time. You need sticks to hit it with though....

I live in a world of infinite possibilities.

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DeepSoulSheep
GOLD Member since Sep 2002

DeepSoulSheep

Carpal \'Tunnel
Location: Berlin, Ireland

Total posts: 2617
Posted:I hope you don't mind me asking this here, seems kinda related....

Anyone know anything about making drums. A friend told me that when she was in Morocco there where classes where you could learn to carve your own drum....Now that sounds good

I'm off to google


I live in a world of infinite possibilities.

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Pele
BRONZE Member since Dec 2000

Pele

the henna lady
Location: WNY, USA

Total posts: 6193
Posted:I know that at several of our Pagan gatherings there have been workshops in drum making. Expensive and intensive but well worth the effort I understand.

Pele
Higher, higher burning fire...making music like a choir
"Oooh look! A pub!" -exclaimed after recovering from a stupid fall
"And for the decadence of art, nothing beats a roaring fire." -TMK

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Kat
BRONZE Member since Dec 2000

Kat

Pooh-Bah
Location: London, Wales (UK)

Total posts: 2211
Posted:Pele - check out the very fabulous Kodo http://www.kodo.or.jp/
br>
and Sado (ondekoza - these guys training is hardcore!)
http://www.ondekoza.com/
br>
Kagemusha based in Exeter - http://www.kagemusha.com/
br>
Mugenkyo http://www.mugenkyo.com/
br>
This guy is fab http://members.aol.com/chappa333/
I have a cd of his, wonderful fusion of taiko and jazz piano

This group came to London, I could not go : ( but they were apparantly rocking http://www.wadaiko-yamato.com/e-main-frame.htm
br>
I was lucky to live in a town in Akita for a year that adored Taiko - it held a big outdoor taiko festival weekend every year and had a drum museum!! Every summer there was taiko everywhere at the street festivals. Ah, sweet memories


Come faeries, take me out of this dull world, for I would ride with you upon the wind and dance upon the mountains like a flame.

- W B Yeats

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Beth


Beth

Miss Whippy
Location: Cornwall & Oxford

Total posts: 1262
Posted:The Dohl Foundation are amazing if you want drum beats. I saw them at glastonbury and again at WOMAD and they just get better, they get everyone moving and i saw a lot of people spinning to them in time, was awesome. I highly recommend them!

Aim high and you'll know your limits, aim low and you'll never know how high you could have climbed.

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Durbs
BRONZE Member since Sep 2001

Durbs

Classically British
Location: Epsom, Surrey, England

Total posts: 5688
Posted:Cool - A drum thread

Making your own drums doesn't have to be too expensive - most of the cost depends either on the wood you're using (if you're even using wood) and if you need to buy the tools.

As to drums I have:-
- Full 7 piece drum kit
- 2 African things my Grandad bought back when he was there in the 1940's
- 1 Djembe
- 2 Tambours (Not tambourines...)
- 1, very sh!te, Bodhran
- Loads of random percussion (cowbells, woodblocks, shakers etc)

I think that's most of them - if anyone wants kit lesson in Surrey by the way, I'm more than happy to teach


Burner of Toast
Spinner of poi
Slacker of enormous magnitude

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Pele
BRONZE Member since Dec 2000

Pele

the henna lady
Location: WNY, USA

Total posts: 6193
Posted:oooooh Kat, you're my new heroine!

Thanks soo much!


Pele
Higher, higher burning fire...making music like a choir
"Oooh look! A pub!" -exclaimed after recovering from a stupid fall
"And for the decadence of art, nothing beats a roaring fire." -TMK

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mech
BRONZE Member since Jun 2003

mech

Carpal \'Tunnel
Location: "In your ear", United Kingdom

Total posts: 6207
Posted:i have a dejembs, several drums such as japanese and chinease drums maily for bass and power and two stealdrums and yes i also have an oil drum drum its well tin sound but its sounds soo good when you goet sevral guys togther

i also have a 52 piece kit that includes bongs and a few other weird and wonderful instruments

later days


Step (el-nombrie)

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i8beefy2
GOLD Member since Mar 2003

i8beefy2

addict
Location: Ohio, USA

Total posts: 674
Posted:I've got a djembe that I ordered from an artist in Ghana. When it came, it was wrapped in cardboard and newspaper, and the whole thing was COVERED in stamps. Seriously, the most stamps I have ever seen. It's a 16" head too.

And I am still learning how to play it well. I can carry a few beats, but I still get lost when in drum circles, hehe. But there is a Rythemfest coming up in my area next month, so I'm gettin ready to go... um... try to carry a beat at least

I love hand drums. They are fun. I would recomend however that you get a smaller drum, not a huge one like I did. Because it is ever so heavy to lug around at festivals I am actually going to buy a smaller one for festival-goin next time I go out, and keep my big one at home. As for buying them, I ordered mine off e-bay. I would NOT recommend this way though, as you really should go find a djembe with the sound you want. I have seen awsome looking drums that sounded off from what I would expect, and I don't think it was just a tuning issue. Festivals are where I recommend picking one up, as drum stores tend to be expensive, though a friend of mine got a good deal on his at one. Listen before you buy!


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Durbs
BRONZE Member since Sep 2001

Durbs

Classically British
Location: Epsom, Surrey, England

Total posts: 5688
Posted:I've always found that it's hard to find a really bad sounding drum. Alot of traditional hand tuned drums are absolute nightmares to tune and unless you know what you're doing it can be a bit pointless - but as long as a drum goes "bonk" (or similar) it'll be useable, especially in a drum circle.
If you have a drum that sounds really flappy you can either leave it in the sun, rub it with your hands or blow it with a hair-dryer for a bit to heat up the rim and get the head tighter. I wouldn't reccomend undoing a Djembe's tuning strings unless you're very patient.

I'd agree as well that size isn't much of a bonus when it comes to drums. A 12" drum can still produce a nice low resonant sound if it's half decent and played properly. The one thing you do get with larger drums is volume but this is often in place of control and they can become a bit ringy... It's definately a case of try before you buy.

I'd also say get a one-off lesson off someone to teach you the different methods of hitting a drum (I'm sure there are sites on the net, but there's nothing like having a person to teach you) as the amount of sounds you can get out of a single drum is crazy. I think I heard somewhere that there are 36 different tabla strokes (although these are played with fingers as well as hands).

Oh, and if want to play loud - Take off any rings or you'll end up with a very bloody skin...

- MooHaaHaa, is that Remo one the djembe shaped drum without tuning strings, nicely rounded edges and claims to be weatherproof? I almost got one but opted for a traditional one instead... How is it?


Burner of Toast
Spinner of poi
Slacker of enormous magnitude

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mech
BRONZE Member since Jun 2003

mech

Carpal \'Tunnel
Location: "In your ear", United Kingdom

Total posts: 6207
Posted:i had a gathering last night and all my male mates tried my drum in eth garden, and i had to tell; eachone,
"lift it from the ground and youll get a better sound!"

so they did and went OH!

so we had fun, with my non spin mate tring to catch a diabolo and missing it when ever i looked! HEHEHEHEHEHEHEHE

anyways keep going i love this thread, its ace i love drumming, im tring to get a newzeland tonga drum does anyone have anyadvice?

later days


Step (el-nombrie)

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Kat
BRONZE Member since Dec 2000

Kat

Pooh-Bah
Location: London, Wales (UK)

Total posts: 2211
Posted:You're welcome Pele Princess, enjoy those tribal beats.


Come faeries, take me out of this dull world, for I would ride with you upon the wind and dance upon the mountains like a flame.

- W B Yeats

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