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Forums > Social Chat > International Language Differences

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Madam Flame
BRONZE Member since Jul 2004

Madam Flame

Satisfying HOPs Lust For Fire
Location: Salem, Oregon

Total posts: 308
Posted:Heheheheeee!! I just love reading people's posts sometimes. I find our language differences to be very fascinating. In the united states, a torch is called a flashlight & a portaloo is called a porta-potty. Sometimes I don't understand ceratin terminologies. Like what does "skinny up" mean? So i thought I'd start a post on our language differences, if anything else it'll help me decifer what people are saying. ubbloco

Never settle for normal.devil
Average thinking brings average results.

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Faberg
GOLD Member since Aug 2003

veteran
Location: Dublin, Ireland

Total posts: 1459
Posted:skinning up is another term for rolling a j peace

My mind not only wanders, it sometimes leaves completely smile

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Madam Flame
BRONZE Member since Jul 2004

Madam Flame

Satisfying HOPs Lust For Fire
Location: Salem, Oregon

Total posts: 308
Posted:ahhh! gotcha! thanks

Never settle for normal.devil
Average thinking brings average results.

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Durbs
BRONZE Member since Sep 2001

Durbs

Classically British
Location: Epsom, Surrey, England

Total posts: 5688
Posted:Heh heh - I knew this rang a bell...

HoP Slang Dictionary

Ahhhh, circles within circles biggrin


Burner of Toast
Spinner of poi
Slacker of enormous magnitude

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Madam Flame
BRONZE Member since Jul 2004

Madam Flame

Satisfying HOPs Lust For Fire
Location: Salem, Oregon

Total posts: 308
Posted:HEHEHEEE! I love it. I'm goign to start using everyone else's slang terms & completly confuse all my friends! This should be great!

Never settle for normal.devil
Average thinking brings average results.

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Xopher (aka Mr. Clean)


enthusiast
Location: Hoboken, New Jersey, USA

Total posts: 456
Posted:Not just slang, either. In another online community I belong to, I started this thread to discuss the differences on the two sides of the Atlantic (extended later to both sides of the equator, too). You should have seen us trying to get across the fact that there are two different kinds of "biscuits" in America, and that neither of them is a biscuit in the UK sense. I think we concluded that they're scones, but it was difficult.

"If you didn't like something the first time, the cud won't be any good either." --Elsie the Cow, Ruminations

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Narr


Narr

(*) (*) .. for the gnor ;)
Location: sitting on the step

Total posts: 2568
Posted:i first came across this when i was little, i had been at a predominately british school (i grew up in hte middle east)and changed schools this second school was an international school but mainly brit and american kids. nehoo i remember i was in 5th grade (about 10 yrs old) and asked the kid nxt to me for a rubber, the whole class fell about laughing, i hadnt a clue why until someone explained that a i call rubber at this school was an eraser and a rubber was a condom ... rolleyes .. not that i knew what that was either ubbangel

she who sees from up high smiles

Patrick badger king: *they better hope there's never a jihad on stupidity*

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Frulein


Frulein

Fireotographer on Hiatus
Location: Cork, Ireland

Total posts: 284
Posted:Written by: Faberg


skinning up is another term for rolling a j peace





biggrin As soon as I read Madam Flame's question I knew that you would answer to it ubblol



I am German and - believe me - for me it is even more confusing! Sometimes I am scared to say something wink Is the rear end thingy of a car called a boot or a trunk over here (Ireland)? If I tell someone I have something in my boot, do they think I have something in my shoe then? Why can't I call crisps chips? Not to mention similar German words that have a totally different meaning in both british and american English (pregnant, chef, ...) .... ubblol


"I see," said the blind man.

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Madam Flame
BRONZE Member since Jul 2004

Madam Flame

Satisfying HOPs Lust For Fire
Location: Salem, Oregon

Total posts: 308
Posted:That reminds me of this one time...My family and I had a Japanese exchange student, who didn't speak a word of english & we took her out for pizza. We ordered a taco pizza & she was sooo disgusted that she wouldn't even try it. I guess that taco in Japanese means octopus, or maybe it was squid...something like that.

Never settle for normal.devil
Average thinking brings average results.

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Xopher (aka Mr. Clean)


enthusiast
Location: Hoboken, New Jersey, USA

Total posts: 456
Posted:I don't think that was it. She probably would have eaten THAT. It was probably all the beef, dairy, and bread.

Most nonwhite adults have trouble digesting dairy, did you know that? That's why there's no dairy in Japanese cuisine. Also Chinese, not counting the Red Bean Ice Cream in Chinatown, which...isn't really aimed at the Asian population there.


"If you didn't like something the first time, the cud won't be any good either." --Elsie the Cow, Ruminations

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Rouge Dragon
BRONZE Member since Jul 2003

Rouge Dragon

Insert Champagne Here
Location: without class distinction

Total posts: 13215
Posted:madame flame, "tako" is octopus in japanese.

i love language differences! for example, i train with american rowers who ask "which team are you rooting for?"....now over here that is NOT something you'd ask ubblol


i would have changed ***** to phallus, and claire to petey Petey

Rougie: but that's what I'm doing here
Arnwyn: what letting me adjust myself in your room?..don't you dare quote that on HoP...

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Medusa
BRONZE Member since Nov 2003

Medusa

veteran
Location: 8 days at Cloudbreak, 6 in Per...

Total posts: 1433
Posted:hmmm...rooting a team...*cough*



That's kinda bad if you say that over here....well more so if you are a chick...

Here's a strange one for you...I stupy Australian sign language...so you know the international sign for Bong *cough* in Australian Sign Language the same sign only means beer.



So no use asking a deaf person if they want to mull up....heheheh


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Rouge Dragon
BRONZE Member since Jul 2003

Rouge Dragon

Insert Champagne Here
Location: without class distinction

Total posts: 13215
Posted:what we call bum-bags are also called "fanny packs" ubblol
ah! endless fun one can have with visiting americans (speaking of which, i havent heard from them in ages...must email them!)

so do you know what AUSLAN for mull is? (by the way, do non aussies actually understand mull? cos i remember talking to some americans when i was in japan and they had no clue what us aussies were on about! not to say that our topic of conversation in japan was....mmm......*hides*)


i would have changed ***** to phallus, and claire to petey Petey

Rougie: but that's what I'm doing here
Arnwyn: what letting me adjust myself in your room?..don't you dare quote that on HoP...

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Xopher (aka Mr. Clean)


enthusiast
Location: Hoboken, New Jersey, USA

Total posts: 456
Posted:OK, what's mull?

Yes, there are many jokes about the word 'fanny', which means something everyone has in America, but which only women have in the UK (and Oz?).

At US baseball games, they sing "Take me Out to the Ball Game" every time. "Root, root root for the home team /If they don't win it's a shame" is one of the lines.

And 'bum' means a disreputable person, or a failure in some way. "Ah, yer a bum" doesn't mean "you're an arse" (or ass, or fanny). It means "loser, you're no better than the panhandlers in the street."

I'm sure there are Oz expressions that sound drrrty in America, too. The famous UK example of 'knock up' might be archaic now, but it used to mean 'rouse someone from sleep by knocking loudly on their door' in the UK. In America, it did and does mean 'make pregnant'.


"If you didn't like something the first time, the cud won't be any good either." --Elsie the Cow, Ruminations

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Madam Flame
BRONZE Member since Jul 2004

Madam Flame

Satisfying HOPs Lust For Fire
Location: Salem, Oregon

Total posts: 308
Posted:Hmmm...I wish I could find this book i have called The American Slang Dictionary. It's got stuff in there I've never even heard of & it tells when it was most commonly used. It's quite interesting, but it does me no good if it's lost.

Never settle for normal.devil
Average thinking brings average results.

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...{SAFE}...


...{SAFE}...

"if i jump in the fire, will you?"
Location: USA, wishing I was in SA

Total posts: 633
Posted:i like the austrailian reference to flip-flops... aka "thongs" !!!

ive had much fun with that one:)


i like breaking the Law frown , of Gravity wink !

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Xopher (aka Mr. Clean)


enthusiast
Location: Hoboken, New Jersey, USA

Total posts: 456
Posted:I grew up calling them thongs too, in Michigan, USA. Then learned in college to call them zoris. "Flip-flops" still sounds silly to me.

BTW, thongs in the modern sense were invented in the 1970s. I was in high school. They didn't get their name until later.


"If you didn't like something the first time, the cud won't be any good either." --Elsie the Cow, Ruminations

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Medusa
BRONZE Member since Nov 2003

Medusa

veteran
Location: 8 days at Cloudbreak, 6 in Per...

Total posts: 1433
Posted:No...I haven't learnt mull in Auslan yet...will have to look it up in my dictionary when I get home tonight....

bum can also mean a slacker over here in Australia.

It just "depends on the context" that you put it in (sorry my Auslan teacher says those words alot).

See fanny over here is not something people would really say because it more refers to the private parts of a woman down south.


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flash fire
BRONZE Member since Jan 2001

flash fire

Sporadically Prodigal
Location: Sydney, NSW, Australia

Total posts: 2758
Posted:Written by: Xopher (aka Mr. Clean)

OK, what's mull?





For educational purposes only


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OrangeBobo
SILVER Member since Nov 2003

OrangeBobo

veteran
Location: Guelph, ON, Canada

Total posts: 1389
Posted:Some of the things I've said and my german teacher didn't know:

kicked the bucked - died
baked - stoned

There's been others, but I just can't remember them.

Also, in NS, we use the word "right" differently... So instead of saying "I'm very tired" or "that was really amazing!" It'd be "I'm right tired", and "That's right amazing" ( I'm guilty for that a lot)

And the most confusing thing of all... when we came here (Halifax) and Weed whackers were called "whipper-snipper"s. ubbrollsmile

~ Bobo


wie weit, wie weit noch?
fragst mich, wo wir gewesen sind...
du fehlst hier

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gita
SILVER Member since Oct 2003

gita

.:*distracted by shiny things*:.
Location: brizvegas

Total posts: 3776
Posted:i love it! ubblol all this stuff is hilarious!!

and what's funnier - here in oz there are names for things and sayings that mean different things too!!! like 'togs'...in some parts of the country they're called 'bathers' or 'swimmers'! ubbrollsmile

and rougie mentioned "what we call bum-bags are also called "fanny packs"
how funny is that! we all know what is meant by fanny packs - but here in oz that's farkin funny! it's like the 'map of tassie' jokes! silly silly language differences!!!!!!!!!!!!!! ubblol

i'm probably making no sense any more so i'll go... wave


do not meddle in the affairs of dragons, for you are crunchy and good to eat!

if at first you do succeed, try not to look too astonished!

smile! grin it confuses people!

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native
SILVER Member since Jun 2004

native

sleeping with angels
Location: anaheim CA usa

Total posts: 508
Posted:ok i need help i guy from the uk was spinning with me and in the middle of his poi set he started shouting oh go oh god my sack is on fire!!! what does this mean ubblol

SLEEP WITH ANGELS muckieha

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flash fire
BRONZE Member since Jan 2001

flash fire

Sporadically Prodigal
Location: Sydney, NSW, Australia

Total posts: 2758
Posted:(drug references and body parts, hrm.... methinks I need to gently remind all members that we are a PG rated site, so let's try and keep it out of the trashy gutter.)

HoP Posting Guidelines
Is it the Truth?
Is it Fair to all concerned?
Will it build Goodwill and Better Friendships?
Will it be Beneficial to all concerned?
If you can answer YES to these 4 questions then you may post a reply.

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native
SILVER Member since Jun 2004

native

sleeping with angels
Location: anaheim CA usa

Total posts: 508
Posted:i am sorry flash i promis to behave ::(:

SLEEP WITH ANGELS muckieha

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Mand
SILVER Member since Oct 2003

Mand

Keeper of the Spitfire
Location: Calgary Canada

Total posts: 2317
Posted:Written by: flash fire

(drug references and body parts, hrm.... methinks I need to gently remind all members that we are a PG rated site, so let's try and keep it out of the trashy gutter.)


From this, and a few other posts by Flash, I've now got this image of her wandering through the threads, dressed in black leather and carrying a whip! ubblol
(but it's a good image! wink) ubblol

Being a brit in America, I get funny looks when I say cheers. Especially being from NE England, I'm used to it being an alternative to 'thanks'.
Apparently it's only used as a toast over here... confused


Lets steal a spaceship and head for the sun, and shoot the stars with a lemonade ray gun.

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Dunc
GOLD Member since Aug 2003

Dunc

playing the days away
Location: The Middle lands

Total posts: 7263
Posted:Lets not get started on Chips then! wink



In an american theme............



What we call an Articulated Lorry is a Truck in America(although we do call it truck too)



And I'm amazed no one has said paraffin is called kerosene



erm...also we have Tights but americans have panti-hose. School "Terms" are called semesters and a roundabout is called a Traffic Circle



That's enough or now me thinks ubbrollsmile


Let's relight this forum ubblove

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Faberg
GOLD Member since Aug 2003

veteran
Location: Dublin, Ireland

Total posts: 1459
Posted:we irish folk tend to get strange looks anytime the word craic (pronounced crack) is mentioned. it's a gaelic expression used to describe a good time spent in good company, with entertaining conversation and/or good music.



e.g.

"i was out last night and the craic was ninety" - literally means that the evening was great fun, though in the past i've unknowingly confused americans into thinking i was refering to the price of my next fix...... ubblol



"what's the craic?" - what's happening, what's going on?

"good craic" - great fun

"come on and we'll go out and have some craic" - let's go out and have a great night



ubbloco


My mind not only wanders, it sometimes leaves completely smile

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Dunc
GOLD Member since Aug 2003

Dunc

playing the days away
Location: The Middle lands

Total posts: 7263
Posted:I don't know if many foreigners use the word bugger for many different things but here in the UK not only does it mean sex in the butt it also means......

Broken - This tin is buggered
Naughty - He's a little bugger for doing that
To Leave - I'll bugger off then
Surprise - Bugger me I didn't expect her home till 10! (can also be used when caught buggering ubbangel )
Nothing - I have bugger all money in the bank
Tired - I was buggered after spending all weekend dancing

Thank you please biggrin


Let's relight this forum ubblove

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Xopher (aka Mr. Clean)


enthusiast
Location: Hoboken, New Jersey, USA

Total posts: 456
Posted:Faberge, 'craic' is also the source of the American English word 'crack' in the sense of 'snide remark'.

Custom Bug, we use the F word (PG site, right?) for some of those purposes, but not all. We would say "my computer is f***ed," and "that's worth f***-all," but not *"I was f***ed after...dancing."

Also, 'tights' refers to a slightly different garment here. Usually somewhat thicker fabric, and worn by dancers of both sexes. Considered QUITE (meaning very, not slightly, in American English) distinct from 'pantyhose', which no man other than a drag queen ever, ever wears.


"If you didn't like something the first time, the cud won't be any good either." --Elsie the Cow, Ruminations

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Zavie


newbie
Location: Paris, FRANCE

Total posts: 24
Posted:men!
I study foreign languages (English being one of course, with German) and I'm supposed to be pretty good
But ow I'd love to laugh as much as you guys do because I don't get half the jokes....!! shrug ubbcrying
Anyways I really like to hear about all language differences as well...


DEATH WILL ALWAYS BE A CELEBRATION OF CONFORMITY.
-Neil Gevisser-

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Mand
SILVER Member since Oct 2003

Mand

Keeper of the Spitfire
Location: Calgary Canada

Total posts: 2317
Posted:I've caused confusion with the underwear-pants-trousers thing.

I'm used to pants being things you wear under your trousers.
But here they are your trousers.

It provides great excitement, and then disappointment, when Spitfire says things like "I think I'll wear my black pants out to dinner'! eek ubblol


Lets steal a spaceship and head for the sun, and shoot the stars with a lemonade ray gun.

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