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Naganootch


AKA CLERIC
Location: Staten Island , NY. USA

Total posts: 172
Posted:I must say i am getting damn tired of this American Ghetto slang. An I apologize to people in other countries that have to hear it used. So i want to start using some slang from other countries but i have no idea what you people might say. Like i know for a fact people from England has some crazy slang cause i was talking to and English girl one day and i had to keep asking what she ment.But for the people outside of the US here is our slang...these all mean it's really cool: thats really cool, Thats Hot!, Tight, sweet, Dude that's badass,ways to refer to a close guy friend: Bro, Dude,Son(oh i hate that one),Ma Nigga,wyas to refer to a girl: BITCH!, girl,female,biznitch,slut(and this is from a friend,,sheesh),chickenheadways to say hi: Hi , hey, whats up, Sup (shortened whats up),Yo,How's it flowin, or just a hand shake that if you didn't know what it was , looks like a secret handshake but everyone does it.Well thats all i can think of ,, please i wanna use some international slang , so tell me what you go. :> )cheers,,heheShizzle ma nizzle biznitch

We are defined by the choices we make

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JeStEr
SILVER Member since Jul 2001

enthusiast
Location: Melbourne Australia

Total posts: 214
Posted:G'day mate
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just have to reinforce the stereotype


Trying to play the Akashic records,
but my turntables not compatible.

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JeStEr
SILVER Member since Jul 2001

enthusiast
Location: Melbourne Australia

Total posts: 214
Posted:here's a few moreU know the oi in Aussie Aussie Aussie, it's used to grab someones attention, as in "oi U, get over here" etcA male: BlokeA female: SheilaStruth, Crikey, Blimey: disbelief, amazement, emphasis, etcI'll think up some more l8r

Trying to play the Akashic records,
but my turntables not compatible.

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Marlboro


member
Location: St.Annes, Lancashire, England

Total posts: 180
Posted:JeStEr, you forgot 'Flamin' Galar'(or whatever that goddamn bird's called!)
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M:-)~


We were somewhere around Barstow on the edge of the desert when the drugs began to take hold.

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Durbs
BRONZE Member since Sep 2001

Durbs

Classically British
Location: Epsom, Surrey, England

Total posts: 5688
Posted:English slang? Here are some weird ones:-Derogatory terms:-(For people)Gopping Cheb Knob JockeyArse banditWanker/Tosser/Toss-potSock CutterFig PluckerBar-Steward(For things)PantsArseWankTypes of people:-Kev - The kind of people who hang round Rusts and stations in the eveningGary - Drives his Ford Escort in 2nd gear with stereo playing crap dance at full volumeSharon - has ridiculously tight pony-tail starting somewhere on her forehead and about 8 paris of massive gold hoop earingsRudeboy - London - often wannabe - KevWideboy - Same as RudeboyRar - Posh git often from Private school------------------I have only one burning desire....let me stand next to your fire

Burner of Toast
Spinner of poi
Slacker of enormous magnitude

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Naganootch


AKA CLERIC
Location: Staten Island , NY. USA

Total posts: 172
Posted:Rusts and stations??????? like a gasoline station?

We are defined by the choices we make

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NYC


NYC

NYC
Location: NYC, NY, USA

Total posts: 9232
Posted:Why you dissin' my peeps, biznitch? I thought we wuz mad tight but you really jus a playa hater. I ain't feelin dat, knowwhatImsayin'son? You betta step off before I'm about to teach you some ghetto respect, boy. Cuz that wak shiznick's a fight on my block. Yo, Props to the REAL bouroughs for keeping it real. Crooklyn's in the hizouse now. I ain't feelin Statin Island right now so you betta stop frontin' for I have to drive on out there and gi you some education bout the GHETTO son.

Well, shall we go?
Yes, let's go.
[They do not move.]

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shizN0T


member
Location: Stroudsburg, PA, USA

Total posts: 184
Posted:ok... here we go
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I was at this IBM work shop in NY, and there was this english guy there... he kept saying "piece of piss" WTF does that mean? We have the expression "Piece of cake" - something easy. and the expression "Piece of shit" - not having worth, junk.


I smell something burning.

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woody


member
Location: Northampton, UK

Total posts: 99
Posted:ShizNot: Piece of piss = very easy
Not sure why. maybe because it is usually easy to take a piss?

More random UK slang:

Blows goats = sucks a lot
Blows cheesy goats = sucks even more! (e.g George Bush blows cheesy goats)
Muppet = well.. muppet. fool. etc etc
Munter = Ugly person.
Trouble and strife = wife
govenor = boss
geezer = bloke
Dogs bollocks = the best (item)
bunch of [censored] = crap.
try: http://www.learnstuff.com/learn-about-london-slang/
for more rhyming slang

EDITED_BY: Malcolm (1349740403)


Luv and Lemons.WoodyMrs Jaypher said, 'It's saferIf you've lemons in your head;First to eat, a pound of meat,And then to go at once to bed.

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woody


member
Location: Northampton, UK

Total posts: 99
Posted:Naganootch. When I lived in Bath there were a group of 15-19year olds who hung out in the Bus and train station. The 15 years old because they had nowhere better to be (?) on a Friday night, and the 17-19 year olds cos they were too sad(?) to have any friends there own age?They basically had a few cars, mainly Ford Escorts and Vauxhaul Novas with body kit and nice stereos.AFAIK their evening entertainment was to hang around their cars playing loud music and ocasionally take it in turns to drive around the Bus station and town.Have seen similar in other Cities and towns in the UK. Anyone know anymore about these sorts of people? or can I continue to diss them because I don't know any better ;-)They might all have a great time, It just doesn't look like fun to me... :-)

Luv and Lemons.WoodyMrs Jaypher said, 'It's saferIf you've lemons in your head;First to eat, a pound of meat,And then to go at once to bed.

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space cadet


member
Location: Minneapolis

Total posts: 19
Posted:I miss London!The ones I remember:nutter= crazy or silly persontake the piss= teaseace/brilliant= goodpants= badbiscuits=cookiesmarmite=something brits find ediblecurry=national dish of Englandtea=water of lifecoffee=nescafe (there is not, to my knowledge, a decent cup of coffee anywhere on the island...
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)cheers= hello, goodbye, how are you, thank you, see you later, have you got any tea?, how about biscuits?, until tomorrow then, enchanted to meet you, which way to the nearest tube?, etc.and if you're an American in England you get used to calling your pants trousers and your underwear your pants. Caused for some silliness when an american friend was trying to compliment a girl on her nice pants and the girl being offended and worried that her underwear was showing...


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Cantus
SILVER Member since Jul 2001

Cantus

Tantamount to fatuity
Location: Down the road, United Kingdom

Total posts: 15965
Posted:Durbs, thanx for reinforcing my wish to never visit Surrey.I went to college in Sheffield and it took me about 2 months to work out what they were talking about. And that's only 65 miles from where i grew up.for exampleThey say sen when they mean self (as in call yoursen a .....)they say while when they mean until or between------------------C@ntus

"I'll carry this....It's harder to spill a hat" - Chellybean
"...like a rabbit caught in a lighthouse?" - Chellybean

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Naganootch


AKA CLERIC
Location: Staten Island , NY. USA

Total posts: 172
Posted:Woody::: yeah we got kids like that over here 2,,, they usually end up being the drunkards or the pot-head degenerates i love to hate. Some of them are ok,, but for the most part they are a waste of space, because they think they are badass and $hite.

We are defined by the choices we make

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Ade
SILVER Member since Mar 2001

Are we there yet?
Location: australia

Total posts: 1897
Posted:G'day mate, howsitgoin' orright?(Hello how are you today?)Flat out as a lizard drinkin'(busy mate, busy)I love aussie slang!See ya this arvo (see you this afternoon)Beauty - very good (as in 'beauty mate')Its broken:It's crookIt's rootedIt's had the swordOk, time to hit the frog and toad
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ade


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Rolph


member
Location: Perth, Australia

Total posts: 22
Posted:Here's some more Aussie slang. aggro - aggressiveshe'll be apples - it will be alrightHave a barney\blue - an argumentbludger - lazy, someone who lives on the dole/welfare payments.

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Fire Princess


member
Location: London/Brighton, UK

Total posts: 130
Posted:Just to confuse everybody even more, in London we have something called 'Cockney rhyming slang'. OK, here are a few to get you started.Woody mentioned 'trouble and strife-wife'apples and pears - stairsdog and bone - phonerosy lee - teaHampstead Heath - teethplates of meat - feetwhistle and flute - suitbarnet fair - hairchina plate-mate (you will often hear people say 'awright, me old china'-hello, my good fellow)That's all I can think of now, anyway I must go, I'm dying for a cup of Rosy...Princess xxBTW, my parents are Irish and they have a whole host of weird sayings...When informed at parents evening that I had been chatting in class with my male friends, my mum said 'her head is carried away with lumps of wee fellers'...ahem, yes.

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clare


member
Location: Perf, australia

Total posts: 82
Posted:hell- extremifies everything, veryjoy - good (that's hell-joy!)whore - slut, or general mild insultrockin' - going (we're rockin' to the traino now), or really good (thats rockin)traino - train stationbottle-o - liquor storetrek - walk (any distance. you can trek to the fridge)jet - leave (i'm jetting now)shane - anyone who wears baggy Nike/Adidas clothes, and baseball capsthats perth, australia

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audax
BRONZE Member since Sep 2001

audax

freelance bum
Location: Upstairs, Australia

Total posts: 286
Posted:In Australia, Seppo meens American, here's why...Seppo is short for Septic Tank...Septic Tank is rhyming slang for Yank...Yank is short for Yankee...Yankee is the nickname for Americans.
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Sounds convoluted, but most aussies know what it meens. I don't make em up, I just explain.To & From is rhyming slang for Pom. Which is a nickname for English.A few roos loose in the top paddock: crazy------------------Your parents were wrongFire is good Play with fire


UYI wink OLDSKOOL

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Naganootch


AKA CLERIC
Location: Staten Island , NY. USA

Total posts: 172
Posted:Audax:: hehe seppo, thats funny.Here's a list of terms for weed.bammer, bionic, bomb, brown, bud, buddha, cannabis, cheeba, chronic, dank, doubage, ganja, grass, green, groove weed, hash, herb, home-grown, ill, Indo, iszm, Lebanon, Mary Jane (mj), maui wowy, method, pot, sess, shake, shit, skunk, stress, tabacci, Thai, wacky and weed. aw shit=emphasis for something really good."AW SHIT bro you wouldn't believe the shit i saw yesterday"Dude,, can be used so many ways. It's all how you emphasise the word. Sounding excited DUDE!,, like good job, long time no see.Sounding Sad duuuuude,,, I'm sorry to hear that,, damn you f'ed up that wave man.Saying it really quick, dude,,, getting someones attention.Sounding Scared,, Dude?,, are you in the closet with a knife ready to kill me?

We are defined by the choices we make

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Shouden-CrD
SILVER Member since Apr 2001

Veteran Member
Location: Tampa, FL, USA

Total posts: 495
Posted:The secret handshake(here in US...or at least here in FL)..everyone seems to know this handshake. Not really a handshake here..kinda one of those hand things you do..anyway..You both kinda hit each other's hand like your going to give the other person five(slap hands together open[palm flat]), when your hands hit, both people kinda curl their fingers as they slide their hands apart. Both people lock their fingers together for a sec, and both let go. It's all done pretty quick.Is this the same as elsewhere's in the US? (I'm sure it's not abroad).Another common 'goodbye' saying here in the US:peace out.CRD[This message has been edited by CrazyRaverDude (edited 26 November 2001).]

-=razyRaverude=-

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Shouden-CrD
SILVER Member since Apr 2001

Veteran Member
Location: Tampa, FL, USA

Total posts: 495
Posted:Ack! Forgot an important slang word that's used alot..(knew I'd think of one..*grin*)phat = Very Good, or Very CoolUse:That music is phat!Translation:That music is very cool!CRD

-=razyRaverude=-

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xLessThanJakex


member
Location: Reading, UK

Total posts: 155
Posted:Just a couple for those who don't know they are pretty common:Grebo = Grunge-GothSkinnin , bennin = laughing eg you make me skin.Bad = good eg that's a bad car dude.Sweet = cool, goodPykie = tramp or someone in general you don't like or in real terms, Gypsy------------------Where there is sorrow I seek the Flame - Rumi[This message has been edited by Fire_Sista (edited 14 October 2001).]

Where there is sorrow I seek the Flame - Rumi

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krystie


member
Location: Saratoga, CA, USA

Total posts: 22
Posted:Yeah, CRD, that handshake is used out here in California too. It makes more sense to see it than to try to describe.. slap- pull *snap*Anyway, another overused slang word here is "hella". I thought at first it was from "hell of a", but it's used in other ways too-That was hella coolhella phathella sweetetc..I don't know how local this is, but a friend from NJ said he hadn't heard it before.Almost everybody here uses that word, and it's also found it's way into the Valley Girl Speak, but I'll spare you all here
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Kristen


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smilee


member
Location: San Diego,CA,USA

Total posts: 40
Posted:heres a few i haven't seen yet-brew-ha-ha: beerbrewski: beerbrew: beerkiss: an easy queston on a testwicked: coolflamer: a realy obvious gay guypunk: pushover, or a punk rockerstank: smellycrib: housepad: housegroovy: cool (most people know that one)sheik: in style or coolslummin: hanging out in the slum, or doing poorlychick: girl chickedy: girloh and I almost forgot this one:squat: an abandoned building where homeless people stay[This message has been edited by smilee (edited 14 October 2001).]

later - Smilee

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Naganootch


AKA CLERIC
Location: Staten Island , NY. USA

Total posts: 172
Posted:CrazyRaverDude::: Yup thats the handshake iwas talking about.Oh the number #1 slang word i hate is,,,,BLING-BLING: means like jewelry or anything expensivce your showing off.

We are defined by the choices we make

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Shouden-CrD
SILVER Member since Apr 2001

Veteran Member
Location: Tampa, FL, USA

Total posts: 495
Posted:In addition to the last handshake I have posted up here, I'm coming to find that a lot of people do another handshake thing in combination to the "slap-pull-snap" handshake. Usually this part is only done if you are good friends(or more than an aquaintance). You both hit your hands together, but rather than slapping your hands together like you are giving five, you slap your hands together grabbing each others thumbs...*putting the other person's thumb between your thumb and your index finger* then you do the pull-snap part.Just figured I'd revive an old thread and add an interesting piece of local culture.------------------ [PLUR]-=Crazy Raver Dude=-

-=razyRaverude=-

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NYC


NYC

NYC
Location: NYC, NY, USA

Total posts: 9232
Posted:My favorite "hand shake" of the moment is the "bam"... basically you just gently punch knuckle to knuckle with closed fists ("wondertwin powers ACTIVATE")It's nice because it's nonchalant and I can do it comfotably with my students. It's also a convenient way to say goodbye in a loud club. Just put your fist out, get a "bam" and people know you're off like a prom dress...

Well, shall we go?
Yes, let's go.
[They do not move.]

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NYC


NYC

NYC
Location: NYC, NY, USA

Total posts: 9232
Posted:Oh yeah, here's a little African American history lesson... Cab Calloway was a famous swing/jazz musician (Who sang such famous songs as "Minnie the Moocher"...) Much of his success was based on his style of playing off of his band members in a way that white bands didn't do. He wore outrageous Zoot Suits and, most importantly, incorporated lots of 1930's inner city SLANG terms... Here's a VERY long list of his famous terms. Some of them are really great! It's interesting to see that every era and culture has it's unique slang...INSTRUMENTS:Guitar: Git Box or Belly-Fiddle Bass: Doghouse Drums: Suitcase, Hides, or Skins Piano: Storehouse or Ivories Saxophone: Plumbing or Reeds Trombone: Tram or Slush-Pump Clarinet: Licorice Stick or Gob Stick Xylophone: Woodpile Vibraphone: Ironworks Violin: Squeak-Box Accordion: Squeeze-Box or Groan-Box Tuba: Foghorn Electric Organ: Spark Jiver GRAMMAR:A hummer (n.) -- exceptionally good. Ex., "Man, that boy is a hummer." Ain't coming on that tab (v.) -- won't accept the proposition. Usuallyabbr. to "I ain't coming." Alligator (n.) -- jitterbug. Apple (n.) -- the big town, the main stem, Harlem. Armstrongs (n.) -- musical notes in the upper register, high trumpet notes. Barbecue (n.) -- the girl friend, a beauty Barrelhouse (adj.) -- free and easy. Battle (n.) -- a very homely girl, a crone. Beat (adj.) -- (1) tired, exhausted. Ex., "You look beat" or "I feelbeat." (2) lacking anything. Ex, "I am beat for my cash", "I am beat to my socks" (lacking everything). Beat it out (v.) -- play it hot, emphasize the rhythym. Beat up (adj.) -- sad, uncomplimentary, tired. Beat up the chops (or the gums) (v.) -- to talk, converse, beloquacious. Beef (v.) -- to say, to state. Ex., "He beefed to me that, etc." Bible (n.) -- the gospel truth. Ex., "It's the bible!" Black (n.) -- night. Black and tan (n.) -- dark and light colored folks. Not colored and white folks as erroneously assumed. Blew their wigs (adj.) -- excited with enthusiasm, gone crazy. Blip (n.) -- something very good. Ex., "That's a blip"; "She's a blip." Blow the top (v.) -- to be overcome with emotion (delight). Ex., "You'll blow your top when you hear this one." Boogie-woogie (n.) -- harmony with accented bass. Boot (v.) -- to give. Ex., "Boot me that glove." Break it up (v.) -- to win applause, to stop the show. Bree (n.) -- girl. Bright (n.) -- day. Brightnin' (n.) -- daybreak. Bring down ((1) n. (2) v.) -- (1) something depressing. Ex., "That's abring down." (2) Ex., "That brings me down." Buddy ghee (n.) -- fellow. Bust your conk (v.) -- apply yourself diligently, break your neck. Canary (n.) -- girl vocalist. Capped (v.) -- outdone, surpassed. Cat (n.) -- musician in swing band. Chick (n.) -- girl. Chime (n.) -- hour. Ex., "I got in at six chimes." Clambake (n.) -- ad lib session, every man for himself, a jam session not in the groove. Chirp (n.) -- female singer. Cogs (n.) -- sun glasses. Collar (v.) -- to get, to obtain, to comprehend. Ex., "I gotta collar me some food"; "Do you collar this jive?" Come again (v.) -- try it over, do better than you are doing, I don't understand you. Comes on like gangbusters (or like test pilot) (v.) -- plays, sings, or dances in a terrific manner, par excellence in any department. Sometimes abbr. to "That singer really comes on!" Cop (v.) -- to get, to obtain (see collar; knock). Corny (adj.) -- old-fashioned, stale. Creeps out like the shadow (v.) -- "comes on," but in smooth, suave, sophisticated manner. Crumb crushers (n.) -- teeth. Cubby (n.) -- room, flat, home. Cups (n.) -- sleep. Ex., "I gotta catch some cups." Cut out (v.) -- to leave, to depart. Ex., "It's time to cut out"; "I cut out from the joint in early bright." Cut rate (n.) -- a low, cheap person. Ex., "Don't play me cut rate, Jack!" Dicty (adj.) -- high-class, nifty, smart. Dig (v.) -- (1) meet. Ex., "I'll plant you now and dig you later." (2) look, see. Ex., "Dig the chick on your left duke." (3) comprehend, understand. Ex., "Do you dig this jive?" Dim (n.) -- evening. Dime note (n.) -- ten-dollar bill. Doghouse (n.) -- bass fiddle. Domi (n.) -- ordinary place to live in. Ex., "I live in a righteous dome." Doss (n.) -- sleep. Ex., "I'm a little beat for my doss." Down with it (adj.) -- through with it. Drape (n.) -- suit of clothes, dress, costume. Dreamers (n.) -- bed covers, blankets. Dry-goods (n.) -- same as drape. Duke (n.) -- hand, mitt. Dutchess (n.) -- girl. Early black (n.) -- evening Early bright (n.) -- morning. Evil (adj.) -- in ill humor, in a nasty temper. Fall out (v.) -- to be overcome with emotion. Ex., "The cats fell out when he took that solo." Fews and two (n.) -- money or cash in small quatity. Final (v.) -- to leave, to go home. Ex., "I finaled to my pad" (went to bed); "We copped a final" (went home). Fine dinner (n.) -- a good-looking girl. Focus (v.) -- to look, to see. Foxy (v.) -- shrewd. Frame (n.) -- the body. Fraughty issue (n.) -- a very sad message, a deplorable state of affairs. Freeby (n.) -- no charge, gratis. Ex., "The meal was a freeby." Frisking the whiskers (v.) -- what the cats do when they are warming up for a swing session. Frolic pad (n.) -- place of entertainment, theater, nightclub. Fromby (adj.) -- a frompy queen is a battle or faust. Front (n.) -- a suit of clothes. Fruiting (v.) -- fickle, fooling around with no particular object. Fry (v.) -- to go to get hair straightened. Gabriels (n.) -- trumpet players. Gammin' (adj.) -- showing off, flirtatious. Gasser (n, adj.) -- sensational. Ex., "When it comes to dancing, she's a gasser." Gate (n.) -- a male person (a salutation), abbr. for "gate-mouth." Get in there (exclamation.) -- go to work, get busy, make it hot, give all you've got. Gimme some skin (v.) -- shake hands. Glims (n.) -- the eyes. Got your boots on -- you know what it is all about, you are a hep cat, you are wise. Got your glasses on -- you are ritzy or snooty, you fail to recognize your friends, you are up-stage. Gravy (n.) -- profits. Grease (v.) -- to eat. Groovy (adj.) -- fine. Ex., "I feel groovy." Ground grippers (n.) -- new shoes. Growl (n.) -- vibrant notes from a trumpet. Gut-bucket (adj.) -- low-down music. Guzzlin' foam (v.) -- drinking beer. Hard (adj.) -- fine, good. Ex., "That's a hard tie you're wearing." Hard spiel (n.) -- interesting line of talk. Have a ball (v.) -- to enjoy yourself, stage a celebration. Ex., "I had myself a ball last night." Hep cat (n.) -- a guy who knows all the answers, understands jive. Hide-beater (n.) -- a drummer (see skin-beater). Hincty (adj.) -- conceited, snooty. Hip (adj.) -- wise, sophisticated, anyone with boots on. Ex., "She's ahip chick." Home-cooking (n.) -- something very dinner (see fine dinner). Hot (adj.) -- musically torrid; before swing, tunes were hot or bands were hot. Hype (n, v.) -- build up for a loan, wooing a girl, persuasive talk. Icky (n.) -- one who is not hip, a stupid person, can't collar the jive. Igg (v.) -- to ignore someone. Ex., "Don't igg me!) In the groove (adj.) -- perfect, no deviation, down the alley. Jack (n.) -- name for all male friends (see gate; pops). Jam ((1)n, (2)v.) -- (1) improvised swing music. Ex., "That's swelljam." (2) to play such music. Ex., "That cat surely can jam." Jeff (n.) -- a pest, a bore, an icky. Jelly (n.) -- anything free, on the house. Jitterbug (n.) -- a swing fan. Jive (n.) -- Harlemese speech. Joint is jumping -- the place is lively, the club is leaping with fun. Jumped in port (v.) -- arrived in town. Kick (n.) -- a pocket. Ex., "I've got five bucks in my kick." Kill me (v.) -- show me a good time, send me. Killer-diller (n.) -- a great thrill. Knock (v.) -- give. Ex., "Knock me a kiss." Kopasetic (adj.) -- absolutely okay, the tops. Lamp (v.) -- to see, to look at. Land o'darkness (n.) -- Harlem. Lane (n.) -- a male, usually a nonprofessional. Latch on (v.) -- grab, take hold, get wise to. Lay some iron (v.) -- to tap dance. Ex., "Jack, you really laid some iron that last show!" Lay your racket (v.) -- to jive, to sell an idea, to promote a proposition. Lead sheet (n.) -- a topcoat. Left raise (n.) -- left side. Ex., "Dig the chick on your left raise." Licking the chops (v.) -- see frisking the whiskers. Licks (n.) -- hot musical phrases. Lily whites (n.) -- bed sheets. Line (n.) -- cost, price, money. Ex., "What is the line on this drape" (how much does this suit cost)? "Have you got the line in the mouse" (do you have the cash in your pocket)? Also, in replying, all figures are doubled. Ex., "This drape is line forty" (this suit costs twenty dollars). Lock up -- to acquire something exclusively. Ex., "He's got that chick locked up"; "I'm gonna lock up that deal." Main kick (n.) -- the stage. Main on the hitch (n.) -- husband. Main queen (n.) -- favorite girl friend, sweetheart. Man in gray (n.) -- the postman. Mash me a fin (command.) -- Give me $5. Mellow (adj.) -- all right, fine. Ex., "That's mellow, Jack." Melted out (adj.) -- broke. Mess (n.) -- something good. Ex., "That last drink was a mess." Meter (n.) -- quarter, twenty-five cents. Mezz (n.) -- anything supreme, genuine. Ex., "this is really the mezz." Mitt pounding (n.) -- applause. Moo juice (n.) -- milk. Mouse (n.) -- pocket. Ex., "I've got a meter in the mouse." Muggin' (v.) -- making 'em laugh, putting on the jive. "Muggin' lightly," light staccato swing; "muggin' heavy," heavy staccato swing. Murder (n.) -- something excellent or terrific. Ex., "That's solid murder, gate!" Neigho, pops -- Nothing doing, pal. Nicklette (n.) -- automatic phonograph, music box. Nickel note (n.) -- five-dollar bill. Nix out (v.) -- to eliminate, get rid of. Ex., "I nixed that chick out last week"; "I nixed my garments" (undressed). Nod (n.) -- sleep. Ex., "I think I'll cop a nod." Ofay (n.) -- white person. Off the cob (adj.) -- corny, out of date. Off-time jive (n.) -- a sorry excuse, saying the wrong thing. Orchestration (n.) -- an overcoat. Out of the world (adj.) -- perfect rendition. Ex., "That sax chorus was out of the world." Ow! -- an exclamation with varied meaning. When a beautiful chick passes by, it's "Ow!"; and when someone pulls an awful pun, it's also"Ow!" Pad (n.) -- bed. Pecking (n.) -- a dance introduced at the Cotton Club in 1937. Peola (n.) -- a light person, almost white. Pigeon (n.) -- a young girl. Pops (n.) -- salutation for all males (see gate; Jack). Pounders (n.) -- policemen. Queen (n.) -- a beautiful girl. Rank (v.) -- to lower. Ready (adj.) -- 100 per cent in every way. Ex., "That fried chicken was ready." Ride (v.) -- to swing, to keep perfect tempo in playing or singing. Riff (n.) -- hot lick, musical phrase. Righteous (adj.) -- splendid, okay. Ex., "That was a righteous queen I dug you with last black." Rock me (v.) -- send me, kill me, move me with rhythym. Ruff (n.) -- quarter, twenty-five cents. Rug cutter (n.) -- a very good dancer, an active jitterbug. Sad (adj.) -- very bad. Ex., "That was the saddest meal I ever collared." Sadder than a map (adj.) -- terrible. Ex., "That man is sadder than a map." Salty (adj.) -- angry, ill-tempered. Sam got you -- you've been drafted into the army. Send (v.) -- to arouse the emotions. (joyful). Ex., "That sends me!" Set of seven brights (n.) -- one week. Sharp (adj.) -- neat, smart, tricky. Ex., "That hat is sharp as a tack." Signify (v.) -- to declare yourself, to brag, to boast. Skins (n.) -- drums. Skin-beater (n.) -- drummer (see hide-beater). Sky piece (n.) -- hat. Slave (v.) -- to work, whether arduous labor or not. Slide your jib (v.) -- to talk freely. Snatcher (n.) -- detective. So help me -- it's the truth, that's a fact. Solid (adj.) -- great, swell, okay. Sounded off (v.) -- began a program or conversation. Spoutin' (v.) -- talking too much. Square (n.) -- an unhep person (see icky; Jeff). Stache (v.) -- to file, to hide away, to secrete. Stand one up (v.) -- to play one cheap, to assume one is a cut-rate. To be stashed (v.) -- to stand or remain. Susie-Q (n.) -- a dance introduced at the Cotton Club in 1936. Take it slow (v.) -- be careful. Take off (v.) -- play a solo. The man (n.) -- the law. Threads (n.) -- suit, dress or costuem (see drape; dry-goods). Tick (n.) -- minute, moment. Ex., "I'll dig you in a few ticks." Also, ticks are doubled in accounting time, just as money isdoubled in giving "line." Ex., "I finaled to the pad this early bright at tick twenty" (I got to bed this morning at ten o'clock). Timber (n.) -- toothipick. To dribble (v.) -- to stutter. Ex., "He talked in dribbles." Togged to the bricks -- dressed to kill, from head to toe. Too much (adj.) -- term of highest praise. Ex., "You are too much!" Trickeration (n.) -- struttin' your stuff, muggin' lightly and politely. Trilly (v.) -- to leave, to depart. Ex., "Well, I guess I'll trilly." Truck (v.) -- to go somewhere. Ex., "I think I'll truck on down to the ginmill (bar)." Trucking (n.) -- a dance introduced at the Cotton Club in 1933. Twister to the slammer (n.) -- the key to the door. Two cents (n.) -- two dollars. Unhep (adj.) -- not wise to the jive, said of an icky, a Jeff, a square. Vine (n.) -- a suit of clothes. V-8 (n.) -- a chick who spurns company, is independent, is notamenable. What's your story? -- What do you want? What have you got to say for yourself? How are tricks? What excuse can you offer? Ex., "Idon't know what his story is." Whipped up (adj.) -- worn out, exhausted, beat for your everything. Wren (n.) -- a chick, a queen. Wrong riff -- the wrong thing said or done. Ex., "You're coming up on the wrong riff." Yarddog (n.) -- uncouth, badly attired, unattractive male or female. Yeah, man -- an exclamation of assent. Zoot (adj.) -- overexaggerated as applied to clothes. Zoot suit (n.) -- overexaggerated clothes.

Well, shall we go?
Yes, let's go.
[They do not move.]

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Jangla


member
Location: Oxford, UK

Total posts: 155
Posted:Get ya plates o' meat to this Liberty Bell for a good ole Cockney rhyming slang dictionary.Anyway, I gotta lava flow down the nuclear sub for a coupla britneys so I guess I'll see ya Christian Slater

---------------------With a bit of luck, his life was ruined; always thinking that just behind some narrow door, in his favourite bars, men in red woolen suits are getting incredible kicks from things he'll never know.

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tallicaburton


member
Location: Troy, NY for school (Austin, T...

Total posts: 51
Posted:Howdy yall...oh wait, no one actually says that in texas, well, not in Austin, well, no one *I* talk too
Non-Https Image Link
The "bam" is really popular, doesn't take much time, you just walk by and bam, for a "Yo wassup". A handshake that is pretty popular here is a normal shake, then move your fingers above the other person thumb, then rotate your hand with your thumb going towards you till it points down and grip, hard to explain...here is some slang my friends and I use...don't be mean:be a lover not a hater, don't be a hater, cool it, don't be dissin, respectPhat stands for Pretty Hot and Tempting, so that girl is PHAT means she is hot, er, sexy.talking a lot, pejorative: running your mouthmary jane: shibbythat's awesome: that's the shiznit, shiat thats badassthere are also many insults that are based on terms for homosexuals, don't ask me, I just live here: Don't be such a queer, shut up fag ect ect...one last thing, here we often greet with not a shake, but a slide. put hand horizontal to ground palm up, other person comes down and slides their hand across the other persons. That's "Gimme some skin yo" um, yeahlaterz and peace out -tallica--------------------------Search for meaning,not guided by thought.Help me find it,I am lost.


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Kyrian


Dreamer
Location: York, England

Total posts: 4308
Posted:well i felt bringing this back up.... cause i am amused by slang lately...

handshakes...lol, yeah, i am familiar with those. another one is wher eyou hit your hand together (fists) from top and bottom first and then do the "bam"...

american slang? I dunno. Ghetto for cool, i think that's been mentioned, a lot of them have. Lily-white is a way of saying wuss... i know i've said stuff that people don't get... but i don't remember what it is...
doing rolls is slang for taking e... is that the same overseas?
hmm..i dunno.. i'm sure it'll come to me...

i just learned that aussies day "go off" for cool... or at least one of them does...

and what is it with calling revising studying?

hmmm ... among my friends we say something's "like damn" to mean it's wayyy that word... like syaing that instead of very... i.e. "he's hot like damn..."

and the "brother" thing is annoying sometimes.....
everyoen is not nesc your brother... but hey

cantus, help me out, what do i say dat's weird?


Keep your dream alive
Dreamin is still how the strong survive

Shalom VeAhavah

New Hampshire has a point....

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Page: 123

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