Forums > Social Discussion > technical vs dance vs performance in routine building

Login/Join to Participate
Page: 1234
mcp
mcp

Flying Water Muppet
Location: Edin-borrow.
Member Since: 20th May 2003
Total posts: 5276
Posted:(this in no way refers to busking. I mean routines in terms of stage routines / multiple person routines.)

Tech vs Dance vs Performance.

I don't see why a techy performance only appeals to a techy audience in some peoples minds. (this is not your minds, just some peoples. sometimes. perhaps my mind too. who knows. it's not directed is what I'm saying.)

Sure if you spin standing still, with no character and no facial expressions just doing techy move after techy move, linked up badly, yeah the only people that would stand to watch that would be a techy audience. (though I don't think you could really call it a performance, more like a demonstration.)

I definately think you can have an exceedingly technical routine, with and without standard 'crowd pleasing' moves that appeals to a lay audience and a techy audience that knows what you're doing.

And if you don't, you're not making your routines right.

Maybe a lay audience can't tell the difference between a 3 and 5 beat weave perhaps, but they're all human, and they have excellent pattern recognition skills built in, they can tell the difference between anti-spin isolated buzzsaw fountain and a butterfly buzzsaw. And if they can't tell the difference between a flower and an anti-spun flower, you just have to make you routine better so they do, like yuta does, when he speeds up as soon as he starts the anti-spun flower, so the audience gets the speed thrill and the pattern is more clear to them.

Yes I'm motivated to make technical routines because I want to use difficult skills in my routine. But I also want to make a beautiful routine also, and one that builds to a climax and all those other things that make a good routine. Character story etc... I also want to trick people into thinking I'm amazing at what i do.

I mean like yeah sure, people will watch for a little while if you're spinning fire around, and that's got their attention, and you might lose it again and never know, cos out of waiting for the next act / nothing better to do, they keep watching. But you can keep it in highly technical ways, like: did he just throw those poi from behind his back? or how come they just stalled upwards like that? I thought they were chains... Did they just get magically shorter? Did they just go through his arms? etc. (this is only a basic idea, I've seen some highly technical character work that uses a very different mindset.)

And will all of that you can add in body movement / dance / expressions and character to keep them entertained.

Like one of 'jam's' (British troupe) moves: Where one poi goes between the legs and then the leg comes over and the poi is free again. They do it as a balletic move, with a sly grin at the audience that is supposed to say (and I quote) "It's naughty but I kinda liked it" Other people do it with martial art kicks, or as jumps and so on. Most moves, techy or not, crowdpleasing or not, can be adapted to make them what you need them to be in your routine.

We've all learnt these hard skills, if would be a shame if we skimpted on the learning to use them in a routine part also.

Yeah that is kinda where I'm coming from, I don't particularly want to have to make a good routine without the tech bits, those skills I spent years working on. But there's also stuff I couldn't put into a routine if I hadn't spent the time on them. Maybe if I wore a skirt and just flounced around a bit I could be a good performer, but I'd rather try and make something that I could respect as well as entertain with.

Just combine them alllllllll!

This is just some unfinished thoughts. So if you disagree tell me, or tell me other examples / counter examples. I wanna know.

sorry it's a bit ranty.


"the now legendary" - Kaskade
"the still legendary" - Kaskade

I spunked in my friend's aquarium and the fish ate it. I love all fish. Especially the pink ones. They are my bitches. - Anon.

Delete Topic

animatEd
animatEd

1 + 1 = 3
Location: Bristol UK
Member Since: 31st Aug 2004
Total posts: 3540
Posted:uh huh. But this was in a circus competition, where all the acts are aimed at a circus audience, who want danger and excitement...

shrug


Empty your mind. Be formless, Shapeless, like Water.
Put Water into a cup, it becomes the cup, put water into a bottle, it becomes the bottle, put water into a teapot, it becomes the teapot.
Water can flow, or it can Crash.
Be Water My Friend.

Delete

_Clare_
_Clare_

Still wiggling
Location: Belfast
Member Since: 22nd Oct 2002
Total posts: 5967
Posted:Puh...

What about beauty, fragility and utter skill?


Getting to the other side smile

Delete

animatEd
animatEd

1 + 1 = 3
Location: Bristol UK
Member Since: 31st Aug 2004
Total posts: 3540
Posted:Mentalists.

Empty your mind. Be formless, Shapeless, like Water.
Put Water into a cup, it becomes the cup, put water into a bottle, it becomes the bottle, put water into a teapot, it becomes the teapot.
Water can flow, or it can Crash.
Be Water My Friend.

Delete

BansheeCat
veteran
Location: lost
Member Since: 29th Jul 2005
Total posts: 1247
Posted:LTC- it is ironic that sometimes a talented performer has taken an extremely challenging skill set and mastered it to the point that when presented to an audience it looks so easy that they have no idea, absolutely no clue, how difficult it is to do. So they may be somewhat underwhelmed... Until they attempt it!



I guess that is why sometimes it can be such a delight to perform for other performers, who do know what went into it all.


I really am happy that so many of the poi/juggling/circus world performers consider "fun" to be a relevant part of their performance!! Both for themselves and the audience. This was never considered in modern dance( in my university at any rate)

Yay for Fun as a movement and performance value!!!


"God *was* my co-pilot, but then we crashed, and I had to eat him..."

Delete

Irinus
enthusiast
Location: London
Member Since: 19th Apr 2006
Total posts: 222
Posted:I'm sticking by my bricks. Pele, come to England and see some of our lovely dry-stone walls. There's other mortarless structures around too... hmm... The Parthenon smile

But I still agree that the mortar is what makes a routine a routine biggrin


Delete

mcp
mcp

Flying Water Muppet
Location: Edin-borrow.
Member Since: 20th May 2003
Total posts: 5276
Posted:y'all might be interested to see where this thread went on tribe, thou they don't get out much so a lot of video posting duplication...

http://tribes.tribe.net/globalcontactstaff/thread/6ad0547d-dc16-4f2f-9816-a771f51d2328


"the now legendary" - Kaskade
"the still legendary" - Kaskade

I spunked in my friend's aquarium and the fish ate it. I love all fish. Especially the pink ones. They are my bitches. - Anon.

Delete

BansheeCat
veteran
Location: lost
Member Since: 29th Jul 2005
Total posts: 1247
Posted:The tribe comments were really interesting, [particularly the one relating the structure of routine development to that of comics! Bliss's outline on basics like using level, form, tempo, etc etc was also useful.She broke the whole picture of routine building down quite well in a straightforward fashion.



If you want to geek out with me, read this... a bit dry, but still fascinating.



http://www-staff.it.uts.edu.au/~don/pubs/fleeting.html
br>


I seems tangental, but may be relevant. The reason I pulled it out is because I was mulling over Megs statement about not using symmetry because it is too static and predictable. And I was thinking, yes, it can be, but there are so many forms of symmetry and ways of applying it, that is does not have to be. In fact, dancing without use of symmetry might be like painting without ever allowing yourself the use of the colour green...Limiting.



Likewise, repetition. Can be useful. This article kind of describes some of the relationships,between design theory and dance which I am hoping may be inspiring if you take a leap from the dry logic into its applications in movement...



Here's an extract from the paper.



"The structure "rhythm" is associated with the mathematical concept of symmetry. Generalised symmetry is the result of some abstract operation capable of transforming one element of a pattern into another (Pedoe, 1957:114). In one dimension (e.g., in time, or along a line), the simple symmetry operations are translation, reflection and scaling. In two dimensions, a rotation by an arbitrary angle is also possible, leading to the 17 possible planar pattern forms (lattice space groups) (Higman, 1955:106). The structure "rhythm" is the appreciation of one dimensional translation symmetry. "Proportion" refers perhaps to scaling symmetry. "Tension" and "balance" appear to refer to particular forms of reflection symmetry. "Tension" is reflection symmetry along an axial line at an arbitrary angle. "Balance" is a more subtle aspect of reflection symmetry, being the equality of moments of forms about a vertical axis. Thus "balance" is concerned with both "mass" and "interval"."



Worth thinking about.



As for the question that surfaced earlier: can you have dance without movement?



He also mentions a dance that was done and presented for the public, with no movement whatsoever. The dancer remained stationary. Apparently it was given a blank review lol



kinesis dance, The holy body tattoo, lalala human steps, Kokoro dance-- some modern dance groups that might have vid clips around the internet you might find inspiring. Enjoy.



smiles

a


"God *was* my co-pilot, but then we crashed, and I had to eat him..."

Delete

mcp
mcp

Flying Water Muppet
Location: Edin-borrow.
Member Since: 20th May 2003
Total posts: 5276
Posted:damn andrea, it's gonna take me another week to digest all this stuff, never mind the whole of this thread...

thanks!

that articles looks rockin' mostly cos it seems real geeky... biggrin biggrin


"the now legendary" - Kaskade
"the still legendary" - Kaskade

I spunked in my friend's aquarium and the fish ate it. I love all fish. Especially the pink ones. They are my bitches. - Anon.

Delete

LazyAngel
LazyAngel

Carpal \'Tunnel
Location: Cambridge UK
Member Since: 29th Jul 2004
Total posts: 2895
Posted:cool article: really interesting! I'd love to see a chart drawn up that accounted for the use of props as well: as I see it, you can have an extra two categories for 'posing' and 'suspended' where the props are moving, and not moving.

Flowing and transition automatically mean there is going to be a prop moving at velocity, unless it is resting on the ground or resting isolated on the body in some way?

I like how the basic idea is very simple, but it looks similar to
what we do with poi: a lot of it seems to be combinations of simple stuff


Because ActiveAngel sounds like a feminine deodorant

Like sex, I'm much more interesting in real life than online.

'Be the change you want to see in the world around you' - Ghandi

Delete

mcp
mcp

Flying Water Muppet
Location: Edin-borrow.
Member Since: 20th May 2003
Total posts: 5276
Posted:Whoa! Read that paper, the rotational symmetry being more obvious in space and repitition symmetry being more obvious in time was super cool to learn about. I'd never thought of that... seems like spinning covers both bases...

also never thought about breaking down the instants that much before either... zero velocity and non-zero acceleration... that's ONLY for an instant... biggrin

off to research those dance groups you mentioned...


"the now legendary" - Kaskade
"the still legendary" - Kaskade

I spunked in my friend's aquarium and the fish ate it. I love all fish. Especially the pink ones. They are my bitches. - Anon.

Delete

BansheeCat
veteran
Location: lost
Member Since: 29th Jul 2005
Total posts: 1247
Posted:Yeah, whoa . I keep rereading it to pick up what I missed and think about how to apply it. Full of ideas and observations. Two that popped up at the latest reading as useful to choreography are:
( extract)

"In a dance pose, symmetry (meaning left-right reflection symmetry) has been condemned by Doris Humphrey. She claims that it is too dull to be used except in beginnings, endings, and rituals (Humphrey, 1959:16). She suggests it conveys a feeling of lifeless safety which is the antithesis of what any dance is about (Humphrey, 1959:50). She also suggests that other aspects of the lines of a figure also convey feelings. A figure with curved lines (succession) conveys mildness. A figure with straight lines (opposition) conveys power. The power increases as the lines become perpendicular to each other. Humphrey also described how the various possible placings of a stationary figure on a stage convey various feelings. She suggests that the upstage corners convey heroic strength and power. The centre-stage conveys a feeling of power at first, but this fades because of its symmetry. Downstage is personal. Positions on the diagonals, away from the corners and centre, convey a precarious feeling of weakness (Humphrey, 1959:74)."

Which could account for your initial response to the idea of symmetry. Also has some interesting staging/blocking perspectives. I am busy thinking about why the diagonal positions on stage should convey weakness, whereas in movement themselves on the body diagonals usually convey the opposite- strengTh and tension.

The other bit I thought would be interesting for poi and staff dancers is the section referring to Laban qualities of movement.
( extract)

"The ways in which a movement is made have been classified by Laban in terms initially of four effort qualities (originally only three): weight, focus, flow and time (Dell, 1977:12). This has been formalised into an Effort-Shape Notation, in which one of 81 symbols is associated with any movement, depending on whether each quality is positive, negative or neutral:



QUALITY/posative/negative

weight- strong, light

focus-direct indirect

flow-bound, free
time-quick,sustained
"

Sorry, that is a neat little chart in the paper and I don't know how to make it that way here...

But I would like to see a staff spinner, or poi, consciously apply these movement qualities to a neutral" move". Like take a common pattern, the butterfly, and do it in all the different ways, finding out what works, what does not, how it changes the appearance and interpretation of the movement. Then select the one that interests you most, or fits the intention of your choreography. Or even look at how you naturally perform a movement, and attempt to break it down in terms of time, weight, flow,and focus... We all seem to have inherent tendencies to certain qualities, and resistance to others.

Fluffy did a little of this- ( maybe not Laban specifically, but changing the qualities of movement with intention and dynamics) in her Play workshop. I forget what the subject of the workshop was. It was great to see how it changed everyones patterns.

Laban notation is really interesting as a choreographical tool.

Lazy Angel, yeah, I think we play with these patterns in poi and staff all the time. Maybe just not consciously. The deliberate application of Laban qualities , and some of the other aspects mentioned in the article to dance using props is something I am only now considering, so not too much useful to say from me just yet. I am curious about if the poi/prop could have one set of qualities, and the person another...where do they merge, should they...Lots to explore in this.

whoa!
smiles
a


"God *was* my co-pilot, but then we crashed, and I had to eat him..."

Delete

DavidJNolan
DavidJNolan

Precision instrument of speed and aromatics
Location: Vienna
Member Since: 21st Aug 2006
Total posts: 240
Posted:There seems to be an overemphasis on performance as DANCE. Dance is a very valid form of performing or presenting your routine, but it is certainly not the only one.

On stage, presentation is everything, particularly to the lay-audience. But you can present simply by stage presence, gestures and your command of an audience, not simply by dancing. Take Antti's contact staff routine. It combines (exceptionally clean) high technique with strong stage presence and a commandinng authority that demands attention. He could hardly be accused of dancing but he nevertheless has, in my opinion, one of the best presented staff routines around.

In the juggling/cabaret/circus world, you rarely see a routine that is simply a dance with a chose prop. Many are complex routines which combine high levels of technical skill with creavite and innovative forms of presentation. A great example would be the Finnish (I think) juggler Wila Walo (however its spelt). He performs highly technical shows with imaging use of video projections to create a really dynamic and interesting presentation of his skill. Indeed, his juggling could be seen as simply one aspect of of the performance, rather than its focus.

I guess the point I'm trying to make is that you can have a technical show with a high level of performance and presentation without having to resort to dance. In many ways, dance is the soft option because its the most obvious. soapbox
If you don't want to dance, don't. Find another way to present your show biggrin


Not a spinner!

Delete

mcp
mcp

Flying Water Muppet
Location: Edin-borrow.
Member Since: 20th May 2003
Total posts: 5276
Posted:Dude you would go and have to ruin your entire argument by saying dance was the 'soft option'.

I suppose staff juggling is the soft option cos everybodies doing it?

almost a good post, until you messed it up.


"the now legendary" - Kaskade
"the still legendary" - Kaskade

I spunked in my friend's aquarium and the fish ate it. I love all fish. Especially the pink ones. They are my bitches. - Anon.

Delete

Stout
Stout

Pooh-Bah
Location: Canada
Member Since: 12th May 2004
Total posts: 1872
Posted:When it comes to spinning, I thing, and talk about dance...alot. But when it comes to actually performing onstage all that theory and talk seems to evaporate in face of an overwhelming concern to not fall on my ass and make an idiot of myself onstage. biggrin

I tend to work between a series of stable stances that allow me to spin a move I know inside out so I can temporarily "forget" about what I'm doing and make eye contact with the audience. They seem to appreciate this.

Choreographing a set routine works well if you know the stage you're going to be spinning on, but usually we don't know anything about the venue until we actually get there, so performing a routine that's written for a larger stage can be a real problem if we're faced with a small stage.

What,,,you want all five of us to get up on that tiny stage ??? Well forget about all that three steps to the right malarkey, looks like we're doing this one standing still. Oh, some moron's put a samba band right under the edge of the elevated stage,,so much for throwing the staff in a risky manner, 'cause If I blow the catch, then somebody's foing to get hurt,,,what happened to the 10 foot safety zone we were promissed ?

So sometimes the choreography doesn't "fit" if you develop a routine that's designed to be used over and over at different venues ( the unamata thread on tribe comes to mind as I write this ) so it's best to allow for some flexability when writing a routine.

It's frustrating coming up with a routine designed to be performed proscinium,only to find that your stage is in the round. Here too, flexability is an asset. A buddy and I have a staff routine that's mainly proscinium, with a few elements to accommodate in the round, but tomorrow I'm going to tweak it to make it even more in the round friendly, seeing as how I know this sunday's show is ITR. No,,wait, We've done this venue before,,,it's thrust, aw crap..

Is this even remotely on topic ? Probably not, but it is revalent to choreographing a routine.


Delete

BansheeCat
veteran
Location: lost
Member Since: 29th Jul 2005
Total posts: 1247
Posted:yes stout, you do think ( and move) like a dancer! Good post, grounded in the reality of performance. Tx!

Y, I agree with mcp, I really thought you had a good point until the end. It is possible to make a superb poi/staff peformance without dance. But only someone who has never danced would call it the "soft" option ! wink


"God *was* my co-pilot, but then we crashed, and I had to eat him..."

Delete

FireTom
Stargazer

Member Since: 20th Sep 2003
Total posts: 6650
Posted:I'm more a dancer than a "techie" and I'm almost embarrassed that I am able to reach the audience with simply dancing with staff and poi, when others do sucha fine job and have to train so hard for it... redface

But certainly a performance bases upon both: dance and technical advance... Goa actually prooves it right now, that someone (hmm, named his alias actually) reaches a lot of people by his technical advance, without dancing much. And what about all these pretty people who simply dance, without having too many tricks?

To me, it is all about personal expression to leave an impression.


the best smiles are the ones you lead to wink

Delete

BansheeCat
veteran
Location: lost
Member Since: 29th Jul 2005
Total posts: 1247
Posted:oh, is someone in Goa?!! Please do be sure he brings some chocolate and comes see me in Thailand January... Er, uhmn, what can I say, his performance at EJC was very impressive? lol wink

Just teasing someone a little... kiss devil


"God *was* my co-pilot, but then we crashed, and I had to eat him..."

Delete

DavidJNolan
DavidJNolan

Precision instrument of speed and aromatics
Location: Vienna
Member Since: 21st Aug 2006
Total posts: 240
Posted: Written by: BansheeCat


Y, I agree with mcp, I really thought you had a good point until the end. It is possible to make a superb poi/staff peformance without dance. But only someone who has never danced would call it the "soft" option ! wink



alright, point taken. maybe a bad choice of words. 'soft option' is dismissive of a performance style which takes years to develop and train to perfection
However, dance does seem to be the first (admittedly logical) option that many people chose when trying to make their poi/staff performance more audience friendly. A really good dance show takes a great deal of work, but no more or less than a really good experimental show.

Personally, I'd rather see an experimental show than a dance performance, because there is a different kind of creativity and originality behind it.


Not a spinner!

Delete

mcp
mcp

Flying Water Muppet
Location: Edin-borrow.
Member Since: 20th May 2003
Total posts: 5276
Posted:You get more chicks if you look like you can dance. I thought that was what was important? (sometimes you get gosling's too, if you're really lucky.)

I don't think experimental gets so many baby birds. frown


"the now legendary" - Kaskade
"the still legendary" - Kaskade

I spunked in my friend's aquarium and the fish ate it. I love all fish. Especially the pink ones. They are my bitches. - Anon.

Delete

Neon_Shaolin
Neon_Shaolin

hehe, 'Member' huhuh
Location: Behind you. With Jam
Member Since: 13th Jul 2005
Total posts: 6120
Posted:Has anyone brought up the concept of 'Techy dancing'. If not can dance styles like bodypopping be categorised as such?



We've already seen Bodypopping applied to CJ but I feel it can easily be applied to others like doubles, contact staff, contact doubles, poi in fact any other skill toy (Kendahma (sp) could be limited in its options...)



 Written by: mcp



You get more chicks if you look like you can dance.





Unfortunately I've found this to be true... frown


"I used to want to change the world, now I just wanna leave the room with a little dignity..." - Lotus Weinstock

Delete

DavidJNolan
DavidJNolan

Precision instrument of speed and aromatics
Location: Vienna
Member Since: 21st Aug 2006
Total posts: 240
Posted:Maybe not, but personally I prefer the experimental option.
And I don't have the time to become a mother goose


Not a spinner!

Delete

mcp
mcp

Flying Water Muppet
Location: Edin-borrow.
Member Since: 20th May 2003
Total posts: 5276
Posted:dance with your props or make your props dance. Both those options still contain dance.

"the now legendary" - Kaskade
"the still legendary" - Kaskade

I spunked in my friend's aquarium and the fish ate it. I love all fish. Especially the pink ones. They are my bitches. - Anon.

Delete

BansheeCat
veteran
Location: lost
Member Since: 29th Jul 2005
Total posts: 1247
Posted:psst-- meg, submit a video audition for my "so you think you can dance" show! ( tribe )

"God *was* my co-pilot, but then we crashed, and I had to eat him..."

Delete

mcp
mcp

Flying Water Muppet
Location: Edin-borrow.
Member Since: 20th May 2003
Total posts: 5276
Posted:but I don't even think I can dance... after xmas maybe, but busy with the old xmas video right now... biggrin

"the now legendary" - Kaskade
"the still legendary" - Kaskade

I spunked in my friend's aquarium and the fish ate it. I love all fish. Especially the pink ones. They are my bitches. - Anon.

Delete

BansheeCat
veteran
Location: lost
Member Since: 29th Jul 2005
Total posts: 1247
Posted:oh, good point, maybe I should solicit audition vids from only those who think they cant dance-- but do... lol

"God *was* my co-pilot, but then we crashed, and I had to eat him..."

Delete

Antti_Everything
Antti_Everything

addict
Location: Jrvenp, Finland
Member Since: 12th Aug 2003
Total posts: 446
Posted:Interesting topic. Too long to go through it all now. I haven't yet really made a theory of how I want my routines to be. But Markku Karvo, a finnish magician who did 5 years in Lido Paris, told me this view on the topic..

A performance should be divided into 3 parts. Last part being the hardest, first one the 2nd and the middle one the easiest. And all of these 3 parts should be divided the same way. So if "1" would mark easy and "3" hard the order is 2-1-3. So get audiences attention with something amazing... take it easier for a while.. and then blow their mind. I guess this would go for tension, expression, dance movement also and not just tricks...

He also talked about the use of stage. The front part has the highest tension and the back the lowest. So the feedback I got from him was that I shouldn't have my equipment in the front of the stage and only use that space for the final tricks.

He was also talking about removing everything irrelevant from a routine. Like wasting time in getting/changing/lighting equipment. Those are dead points. Irrelevant.. nothing to see there. Unless ofcourse if you make something out of it. So get someone else to put out equipment and minimize waste of time in these parts.

Antti "Can't be accused of dancing" Suniala wink


Point your toes.

Delete

Antti_Everything
Antti_Everything

addict
Location: Jrvenp, Finland
Member Since: 12th Aug 2003
Total posts: 446
Posted: Written by: _Y_


In the juggling/cabaret/circus world, you rarely see a routine that is simply a dance with a chose prop. Many are complex routines which combine high levels of technical skill with creavite and innovative forms of presentation. A great example would be the Finnish (I think) juggler Wila Walo (however its spelt). He performs highly technical shows with imaging use of video projections to create a really dynamic and interesting presentation of his skill. Indeed, his juggling could be seen as simply one aspect of of the performance, rather than its focus.




It's Ville Walo smile. http://www.walonet.com/


He's also or atleast was a part of the infamous http://www.peapot.net/


Point your toes.

Delete

_Clare_
_Clare_

Still wiggling
Location: Belfast
Member Since: 22nd Oct 2002
Total posts: 5967
Posted:"Antti "Can't be accused of dancing" Suniala"

It's lies! Lies I tell ya! I've seen you tongue


Getting to the other side smile

Delete

mcp
mcp

Flying Water Muppet
Location: Edin-borrow.
Member Since: 20th May 2003
Total posts: 5276
Posted:If we're going to get into routine building stuff I like this article best:

http://www.jugglingdb.com/compendium/performing/creatinganact/anewroutine.html
br>
other good stuff:

http://www.jugglingdb.com/compendium/performing/creatinganact/
br>
steven ragatz does another good turn of advice here:

http://groups.google.com/group/rec.juggl...6b76848fe15da4f


"the now legendary" - Kaskade
"the still legendary" - Kaskade

I spunked in my friend's aquarium and the fish ate it. I love all fish. Especially the pink ones. They are my bitches. - Anon.

Delete

O_rin88
O_rin88

Member

Member Since: 27th Sep 2006
Total posts: 2
Posted:Wow, I've found this whole discussion extremely interesting. My two cents: Last year I took an intro. Jazz dance class and let me say it was perhaps one of the best things to help my spinning. Dance taught me how to move my body and what is the movement that my body is going through. I spent the next summer simply relearning moves I knew but in combination with various dance moves, dance steps, turns etc. An example of dance fundamentals incorporated into spinning would be Yuta style, he's got amazing form (in terms of dance) with his open arm turns, even down to his head positioning. He spins so that he doesn't get dizzy by doing the whole spot, whip the head around, spot again. This technique is taught in almost all dance disciplines. I consider the difference between an novice spinner and the next level is being able spin while dancing'.

It makes the shows more interesting for all involved for any type of audience can appreciate a well spun danced routine. Imagine, if people go to see dances people must be wowed at seeing dance combined with spinning and fire no less. Also all the teckes can appreciate the ability of a spinner to both move and spin. It is no denying that it is a fundamental part of spinning and spinning well or achieving a higher ability level. It just looks smoother if used.


Delete

Page: 1234