pltearthstranger
2 posts


Posted:
Hey all!
I've been spinning for about 3 months, sometimes on and off, but lately I've been putting a lot more effort into it. By the way, this is my first post on this forum! I really want to get good and learn a bunch of moves in order to have total freedom of movement and be able to dance freely... Anyway, to the point of this post... I've been trying hyperloops for 2 days now, and I can see a slight improvement, but I still hit myself a lot, and my Poi tangle up a bunch too. These are the weave hyperloops btw... I wanted to get an idea of your experience learning this move... how long did it take you? what helped you, etc...

thanks to all, happy spinning

JuggleSeanGOLD Member
Ooops
116 posts
Location: EARTH, USA


Posted:
Hello, Welcome to the forums btw.

It took me a long time to understand how hyperloops work. I am currently practicing with different hyperloop variations and am still intrigued by them after playing for over a year. What helped me was to master doing air wraps on each side and direction, and spinning very very slowly so I could watch how the Poi wind and unwind.

I suggest master air wraps, watch this video

#! , and practice like crazy.

Good luck

Groovy


JamethGOLD Member
enthusiast
378 posts
Location: NSW, Australia


Posted:
IMO it's hours practice not time - given that and the fact I don't measure closely:

I went the airwrap first route, and starting with good wall plane and split timing control it took me about 15 hours to get airwraps solid with both hands (I'm kinda slow learning new phyiscal skills).

Another 10 hours or so to get hyperloops both ways - my evil hand usually takes about twice as long as my good one.

Paddington BearSILVER Member
member
118 posts
Location: England (UK)


Posted:
I find when i try to lock a hyperloop in that one end ends up longer than other putting the spin off, how i dont know? anyone seen or had this problem. Im using the cone Poi with the swivel and knob handles btw.

fire is alive. it lives and breathes. it consumes and destroys. but we control it and live with it, we are fire dancers


CalibudGOLD Member
φωτιά
49 posts
Location: St. Louis , USA


Posted:
I learned the hypers on my Sock Poi. I have a set of the cone and wooden ball tips with swivels.. they seem to do good with them. I would say when you come out of your weave (whatever side it may be) do it really slow.. like almost as slow as you can.. When you start to watch the knot/twist and learn where the (midpoint) is in your Poi it helps out. I still get the, one longer than the other, occasionally. I am not a good teacher, I have had a few people ask me too and its hard to explain how I think and relate that to Poi.

After stepping away from my explanation i noticed that coming out of the weave on my right side I make a big circle with both hands/arms to help slow the Poi and get that midpoint intersection dead on. Lots of practice here. I didnt learn the loops until about my 12-14th week.

SpinnerofDetroitGOLD Member
All High Dude, Ruler of What You Want
2,280 posts
Location: Trenton, MI, USA


Posted:
I remember with orbitals and maybe hyperloops way back in the day to learn it I stared out with my planes atomic so that i could very accurately hit the Poi evenly and in the middle. As I got better I slowly bent my planes more and more parallel to eachother. So if you don't know what atomic is for this explanation, one Poi will be on this plane... | ... and one will be on this plane... _ ... It's a lot easier to aim it that way and hitting them evenly will make the biggest difference you can imagine. Other than that I can just say exit on even beats. You count the Poi heads passing by your head 1,2,3... and at first practice exiting on 2 until you can do it without thinking. Then practice counting 4 passes, then 6 and continue as much as you wish.

One of my favorites is that if you get good at hyperloops and can hit them evenly, you can do a hyperloop and hold it for a little while, then pull it into an orbital. No one ever expects it grin

The only luck is bad luck.

Shut up before I stall my Poi up your ass grin


JamethGOLD Member
enthusiast
378 posts
Location: NSW, Australia


Posted:
I'm using cone Poi with swivels and single-loop handles: at first I was hitting one or both Poi off-center, practice and concentrating on the cross point, and more practice, got things even.

pltearthstranger
2 posts


Posted:
Hey guys, thanks for the tips! I do have trouble hitting them right in the center, specially on my left side, so I'm really going to practice this by slowing it down too I guess. Did you guys know how to do isolations before starting this move? I believe this must really help, and I don't know how to do them yet...

Many thanks!

CalibudGOLD Member
φωτιά
49 posts
Location: St. Louis , USA


Posted:
I had the concept of isolations down... that is only being able to do them coming out of a weave for short periods of time. I know them a lot better now. Start with backwards ones, they are way easier.

astonSILVER Member
Unofficial Chairperson of Squirrel Defense League
4,061 posts
Location: South Africa


Posted:
Bear this diagram in mind.

For a hyperloop, you will move from right to left, but the basic mechanics are the same.

'We're all mad here. I'm mad, you're mad." [said the Cat.]
"How do you know I'm mad?" said Alice.
"You must be," said the Cat, "Or you wouldn't have come here."
- Lewis Carroll, Alice's Adventures In Wonderland


i8beefy2GOLD Member
addict
674 posts
Location: Ohio, USA


Posted:
Honestly can't remember how long. Maybe a month after I tried learning em. Reverse is easier than forwards, at least for me.

Try imagining a laser pointer straight out from your chest. It should point at the TANGLE point all the way through the move. When people say right to left, you usually picture something like the the Poi tangling on your right, then going between your arms, and then moving to the left to untangle.

Try moving THROUGH the move instead. Start with the left foot forward and the right foot back (Think like the stance you'd have pushing a car). And SLIDE the right foot forward through the move as you progress from right to left. You should have a "pushing" sensation from your gut that extends exactly THROUGH the tangle point as it moves from the right side, to in front of you, to the left side.

As you get better, you can slow down the transition between the arms, turning it into an orbital, but the move itself is the same.

Another thing to focus on: the sound. If you're using chains, you'll hear a distinct click as the chains tangle. If you start hearing sliding chain-on-chain sound, then you aren't focusing enough on the tangle point.

It also helped me when I began to think of reverse air wraps as going upward, e.g. if moving from right to left, making it from lower-right to upper-left. It allows you to slow it down a little and focus on that sound I'm talking about.