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Jo


Jo

member
Location: Sheffield, England

Total posts: 517
Posted:Ok, so I've always assumed that people see colours differently. Some like red, some like blue etc. I guess the brain interprets eye signals differently in each of us.

Also I was wondering if a similar principle could apply to the transparancy left in the air by fire or glo spinning. Will the trail from a spinner be longer in some peoples eyes than others?

I'm thinking probably yes - anyone know?
Jo. confused


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Skulduggery
GOLD Member since Aug 2004

Skulduggery

Pirate Pixie Crew Captain
Location: Wales

Total posts: 8428
Posted:I think it probably has to do with the number of rods and cones in a particular persons retina and the ratio of one to the other.

This site explains about cones and rods for those that are a bit rusty on their anatomy of the eye.

I'm guessing people with more rods will see longer trails. People with more cones will see brighter colours.


When I don't have such a fuzzy head I'll come back and put what I mean in not so simplistic terms. That is if someone doesn't come along and prove my theory utter pants before then biggrin


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Flame Boy
GOLD Member since Jul 2004

Flame Boy

veteran
Location: Out

Total posts: 1508
Posted:The trail left across your vision would remain for as long as the retina didnt heal itself (if thats the right way of describing it shrug ), and some peeps heal quicker than others, so while it maywell only be a matter of milliseconds, i reakon some peeps would see a longer trail than others biggrin

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dafunkymahn


member


Total posts: 54
Posted:I wonder then how many cones and rods a perfect eye should have? Would they be equal numbers or more than one and less of the other?

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Prometheus


Prometheus

Diamond In The Rough
Location: Richmond, Virginia

Total posts: 459
Posted:Ideally, the distribution of rods & cones would be just as it is, unless you would want to say, sacrifice color for contrast...

Even a person with 20/20 vision can't claim perfect sight, because a classmate of mine actually had 20/10 vision. I don't think there is a perfect eye, or any other organ for that matter. As long as they function, I'm happy. (Although Sandra Bullock has a near-perfect...um, nevermind)


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And all that's jazz
BRONZE Member since Jan 2005

member
Location: just behind your left shoulder

Total posts: 92
Posted:I'm a little dubious on the whole matter.

It certainly is true that a different ratio of rods and cones (or, technically, chemicals within) will change the way you see the earth - this is the basis of monochromat/dichromat colourblindness, where one type of cone is missing (usually the 'green' or 'red' cone), resulting in the confusing of colours. A lack of rods, however, will NOT ostensibly increase the intensity of colour you see, as you still have the same number of cones producing the same level of neural signal. You will lose your night vision (rods are responsible for low-light vision but only see in black and white, which is why, when you see in the dark, everything is pretty much in black and white.) and your light vision may become altered somewhat in intensity etc., I'm not entirely sure. To increase the level of colour you see or the amount of light input into the eye, you would need to increase the number of receptors, dilate the pupil (increase light input) or increase permativity of the optic ganglia (increase nerve signals per amount of light).

Flame Boy had an interesting idea about the rate at which the retina 'healed itself', by which I think he meant the time which nerve cells take to repolarise after firing (I'm not ragging on you, I was just a bit confused and wanted to clear it up). This could potentially have a difference in vision, though given the rate nerve cells actually fire at (up to 100 shots a second), differences will be minimal.

As I mentioned, I think that differences produced by minor differences in numbers of rods and cones (major differences, as in colour-blindness, being a different matter) and nerve cell transmittance etc. will probably be negligent in changing how two people see the poi in flight and the colour/length etc. of trail they see. However, we can never really be sure - there is no way to see through someone else's eyes and see what they see, so the mystery may well remain unsolved.


Some things that could change the way we see poi flames could be actual colour-blindness (a lack of one or more cone types on the retina), the rare achromatopsia (I think it's called) where all cone types are missing, resulting in very 'fuzzy', ill-focused vision and a blindspot at the fovea (focus-point) of the eye; this would kind of be like looking through a glass of water in black and white and not seeing the stuff in the centre. Some other interesting variations could those rare individuals who are dichromat (partially colour-blind) in one eye and trichromat (normal) in the other eye, who would see flames (especially coloured ones) differently with each eye; or, rarer still, people who cannot see motion, but instead see the world as a series of isolated snapshots - as if the world were perpetually in a strobe light (this, interestingly, is caused by a defect in the visual cortex of the brain rather than in the eye). Amazing, really, how vision works.


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Jo


Jo

member
Location: Sheffield, England

Total posts: 517
Posted:Nice replies.

aat Jazz, thats excellent stuff, there's just one thing I think still confuses me out of all that - when you say:

"This could potentially have a difference in vision, though given the rate nerve cells actually fire at (up to 100 shots a second), differences will be minimal. "

So why do we see longer trails than 1/100 second? I think trails for bright poi are about 1/5 second - that's too big a difference for there to be no other factors involved if what you said is spot on (I'm sure it is)

Jo.


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vanize
SILVER Member since Aug 2001

vanize

Carpal \'Tunnel
Location: Austin, Texas

Total posts: 3899
Posted:Written by: Skulduggery

I think it probably has to do with the number of rods and cones in a particular persons retina and the ratio of one to the other.




and how dialated their irises are! ubblol


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Skulduggery
GOLD Member since Aug 2004

Skulduggery

Pirate Pixie Crew Captain
Location: Wales

Total posts: 8428
Posted:oh ok so you have all proved my half baked, half asleep, A-lever biology theory to be pants. I'll go back to being pervy in the intro's threads and leave the science to the big boys ubblol tongue

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vanize
SILVER Member since Aug 2001

vanize

Carpal \'Tunnel
Location: Austin, Texas

Total posts: 3899
Posted:it wasn't me! I was just making a joke! hug

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Skulduggery
GOLD Member since Aug 2004

Skulduggery

Pirate Pixie Crew Captain
Location: Wales

Total posts: 8428
Posted:ubblol I know hun, I was just joking hug

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