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DeadManWalkin30


member
Location: Staten Island, NY

Total posts: 25
Posted:I was wondering how many different styles do people on this page know??
I personally have taken a year or two in Tae Kwon Do and have recently started Okinawan Goju Ryu


Fanaticus Incendi -Pyromaniac

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Thistle


Thistle

old hand
Location: Nottingham UK

Total posts: 950
Posted:I have recently started learning Wing Chun.

Here are some related threads.

Martial Arts Styles
poi and martial arts

[ 31 August 2002, 22:10: Message edited by: Thistle ]


Are we nearly there yet?

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SickpuPpy


SickpuPpy

Ninja Rockstar!
Location: Denver, Co. U.S.A.

Total posts: 1100
Posted:Bujinkan Budo Taijutsu
Togakure Ryu Ninpo
Kukishin Ryu bo, jo, and hanbo jutsu
Gyoko Ryu Koshijutsu
Takagiyoshin Ryu kenjutsu
and a few more that I can't remember how to spell temperd by a short time in Kung Fu and Aikido.


Jesus helps me trick people.

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Cassandra


Cassandra

Froggie ... Ribbit !!!
Location: Back in Paris... for now !

Total posts: 4224
Posted:Aikido
Aikido
Aikido
but I love any style
great sumo fan as well

shine on
Cass


"I want brown bread... no, that is diesel oil..."
"So I was raised in Europe, where History comes from ..."
"NON !!! La Plume de mon oncle n est pas Bingibangibungi !!!"

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BurningByron


member
Location: Australia

Total posts: 340
Posted:I do ninjukai taijitsu but I'm also learning Tae Kwon Do, capeiweri (spelling), karate, silat and drunken boxing when ever I go to fight club.

I do fulling contact sparring with mates every saturday and the stuff I learn from those guys is amazing. Experience with actual confrontation is everything.


HOW TO FLY 101:
step 1. Throw your self at the ground.
step 2. Miss.

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Mean not nice guy, that is friendly


member
Location: Nowhere,Anywere/the middle of ...

Total posts: 92
Posted:Tae kwon doe
nin-jitsu
and Tia Chi
are my favorites
i only know Tae. and Tai.
i'm not really good at Tae coz i'm still a yellow belt
But i'm okay in Tai Chi.3rd level if i'm not mistaken.but thats no saying much.
___________________________
Have no fear, I is here.


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Kurobei


member
Location: The Phire Kru

Total posts: 786
Posted:There are literally hundreds of martial arts, but ALL of them originated from India.

Here are some examples; in 16th century Japan, the combat side of the martial art we know today as Ninjutsu consisted of over 20 different martial arts including ones dedicated to simple things like fishing with a net (Toamijutsu) and tree-climbing (Shoten no jutsu)!!!!!
Gung fu has many "Internal" systems like T'ai Chi and "External" systems like Drunken Man, in the Shaolin temple alone there are at least 72 different styles of Gung fu, all of them secret.

The arts vary between schools and indeed countries, Sul Sa in Korea is very similar to Ninjutsu in Japan.

Here are some examples:

Bujinkan Budo Taijutsu: The Bujinkan is a system devised by Dr. Masaaki Hatsumi who is the Soke (Grandmaster) of 9 different Ninjutsu Ryu-ha (Schools/traditions)

Togakure Ryu Ninpo "Hidden Door school"
Gyokko Ryu Koshijutsu "Jeweled Tiger school"
Koto Ryu Koppojutsu "Tiger Toppling school"
Shinde Fudo Ryu Dakentaijutsu "Immovable Heart school"
Kukishinden Ryu Taijutsu "Nine Demons
school"
Kumogakure Ryu Ninpo "Hiding in the Clouds school"
Gyokushin Ryu Ninpo "Jeweled Heart school"
Gikan Ryu Koppojutsu "Truth & Justice school"

These nine different schools were founded at different times ranging from the 12th century to the 17th century and yet we now regard the Bujinkan as ONE school rather than a system.
Each Ryu-ha teaches a different combat method so you can imagine when you put them all together as a system.................

There were also "updates" if you will in Japan, e.g:

The old suffix "jutsu" was used to refer to a military art form or discipline, the commonly used "do" today refers more to a way of life.

Kenjustu - Kendo
Iaijutsu - Iaido
Jujutsu - Judo
Aikijutsu - Aikido
etc...

Also there are martial arts that have been lost in time or are simply no longer practiced: Wajustu and Hobaku are the only ones that springs to mind at the moment but I'm sure there are more.

I'm not too hot on martial arts history in China and Korea but you'll find other countries like Indonesia will have Silat as their National martial art and Thailand will have Muai Thai, even some western countries like France have a National martial art that is their own.

I imagine Gojo Ryu to be Karate-Do school as Karate was an Okinawan martial art, you might also want to have a look at Tae Kwon-Do (Foot Hand Way), this is a Korean martial art and is sometimes called "Korean Karate" (by those who don't know any better!!!), it's renowned for it's high and strong kicks. You may be able to get some info from the ITF (International Taekwondo Federation).

I can give you a pretty big list of styles, schools and places to learn them if that's really what you're after, otherwise I hope this has helped you to clarify that there are a lot of martial arts out there.

[ 03 September 2002, 02:17: Message edited by: Kurobei ]


whats up with all the limitations?

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Jello


ambiguous
Location: Mpls, MN, USA

Total posts: 646
Posted:I'm going to be taking a class via school for Tae Kwon Do, start tommorrow I've always wanted to take some kind of martial art, but direct competition is kind of against my nature, I prefer solo sports (skiing) or team (soccer). The whole mano a mano deal may prove to be a problem, but I'm just doing it for fun so hopefully thats what I'll have.

_________________________________
Fuzzy Dice.......................................

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Mean not nice guy, that is friendly


member
Location: Nowhere,Anywere/the middle of ...

Total posts: 92
Posted:yeah, but sparring is so much fun.
It is sorta like......
"Oh, what you gonna go crying to yo mama now wuss"
And then they turn around and beat the crap outta ya'. . that happened to me at tae. class.
A kid i was sparring at the school. and he stopped tae. and went straight to kick boxing which is like my sport coz' it's fun and he got knocked out. we both got yelled at coz' we just started going all ape against each other.
Lets see he did: Nin., to tai. Back to tae, then he did some stupid round house kick and i blocked and hit up his leg.
it was fn but he got his team and tried to front but me and my boi's whiped out or heat then......
Oh wait that was a lie i am watching a DMX video.
Sowwy.
_______________________________________
have no fear, I is here.


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SickpuPpy


SickpuPpy

Ninja Rockstar!
Location: Denver, Co. U.S.A.

Total posts: 1100
Posted:To say that all martial arts originated in India is really only correct in a very loose sense. Kung-fu has very strong roots in India. Shaolin Ch'uan was founded in the sixth century by a man named Bodhidharma (P'u-t'i-ta-mo in Chinese). He was the third son of a Brahman king, and left a his southern India monestary to spread Ch'uan Bhuddism. When he saw that his monks were becoming fat and unhealthy from sitting all day in meditation he adapted many of the traditional Indian fighting styles into an exercise system for the monks to stay healthy. This, over the next few hundred years evolved into a martial dicipline that was renound to be invincible. It was Kung-fu that eventually had the influence over creating the other forms of Asian martial arts. The Shao-lin Bhuddist monastaries became the repository for this amazing fighting knowledge. The knowledge of Kung-fu began to spread through out Asia as monks left the monistaries to travel and minister Bhuddism, and as people sought out training at the temples so that they could provide protection for their villages. Many of the diffirent styles found in kung fu came from diffirent people who thought they could beat the monks and would challenge them, praying mantis for example.

But to say all arts came from India can't possibly be true, there are so many cultures that were isolated from one another who have independant fighting styles. Many evolved from the beginning of man, when one man realized he could hit his enemy with a rock or a stick, and then figured out how to do it better. But in a loose context I would agree.

As far as Bujinkan is concerned, Dr. Massaki Hatsumi is the grandmaster of the nine different schools of the Bujinkan. He is the soke of (head) of many, many other styles that he is single handedly keeping alive. I have heard as little as fifteen other styles and as many as fifty. Hasumi Sensei is probobly the only one who knows for shure.

Not all nine schools of the Bujinkan are ninja ryu either. The Togakure is infamous for being a ninja clan, Togakure mountain is located in the Iga region of Japan (for those who are ninja scroll fans). Koto-ryu and Gyoko-ryu are also ninja clans, but there are, i believe, four of the nine schools that are just regular martial arts, focusing on the Samurai style of combat (shotokan, ryushinkan, ext.).
The schools of knowledge that the Bujinkan preserves were rather scatterd through out Japan. The ninja schools arose out of neccessity to combat the opressive ruling caste and warrior caste. Very much like the Minute Men of the American revolution, or the soldiers of the French Resistance, the ninja were there to protect the common people, who weren't widely considerd to have any rights by the ruling caste. So what is considerd to be modern Ninjutsu is rather subjective. Bujinkan and Gimbukan are the largest schools claiming to teach the ninja path, but there are those that will say that the Togakure style is the only true form of ninjutsu, or Koto-ryu or what ever.

Every student and teacher will argure to no end how his art is the best and most complete and historicly sound, but when it all comes down it falls to the hands of the practitioner rather than the mouth of the historian. I have seen a 2nd degree Shotokan black belt get severely beaten by a 13 year old kid who had no training what so ever. I firmly believe that style does not matter (other than what fits your body style and comfort) only application and flow.


Jesus helps me trick people.

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Akurei


member
Location: Here

Total posts: 12
Posted:hmmm.... I've been studying Uchiryu Karate for the past 3 or 4 years. Its really fun! and it's almost what I'm known for.... besides my insanity, sadistic comments, sarcastic ways and all around odd... Anyways...

Hey! Jello! I'm quite sure your Sensai wouldn't MAKE you spar if you dont want to, you could just go to learn all the Tae Kwon Do, um, stuff ... though I find sparring the funnest thing to do... except when you spar with your Sensai and he kicks you in the head.... *grummble* that hurts.... or when... umm.... I'll just stop complaining now ^^*
My point is: Learning Martial arts is fun and a good way to vent


Ok, so you like DONT remember. I was here before, frolicking about with a bunny on my head and you said 'Let's dance' and I said 'Oook' and the next thing I know you are all FOOM with the fire and the evil and the killing... and what kind of person scares the poo out of a 10 year old girl anyways huh, HUH?!? ... ... ... I DON'T LIKE POO! *turns to bunny* AND SHUT UP!Ohhhh.... whats that sweet smell? It smells kind of like cookies... or death.... or them uhhhh death cookies!AHHHHH!!!!.... wait a minute... didn't I set you on fire and burry you in the backyard?

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BurningByron


member
Location: Australia

Total posts: 340
Posted:Sickpuppy, I totally agree with your comment on flow. The flow, spontenaity and adaption skills I have learnt in the last 6 months have been way more valuable than any training I've had. I've taken out guys twice my weight with twice my training and twice my experience in hand to hand combat simply because I could adapt to his style and flow within the moment while he could not.

There are very very few martial arts centres in the western society that are non-comercialised and non ego based. This is a very sad thing indeed because a martial art is no good for the student if he is fighting with his ego and a martial art is no good for a teacher who teaches for the money.

I'm involved in Ninjukia Taijitsu which covers all forms of hand to hand combat but most importantly teaches flow, spontenaity, adaption, controlling the ego and spiritual awareness. The organisation is non-profit and it does a large amount of charity work. This is what i believe a martial arts centre should be like and I'm sad to say it is the only one like it in Western Australia, and one of the very few across all of Australia.

Are there any others martial arts centres like Ninjukai Taijitsu that you guys have found?


HOW TO FLY 101:
step 1. Throw your self at the ground.
step 2. Miss.

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Cassandra


Cassandra

Froggie ... Ribbit !!!
Location: Back in Paris... for now !

Total posts: 4224
Posted:As always I like your vision of Martial arts Sickpuppy ...
Especially about which school's the best when in the end it's just about the practitioner and also teh master's spirit and level...

Question : while in Japan I met with a very old master whom I think is quite interesting and good person too .. now most of his students were total PRICKS .... so is there a lesson to learn.
is a master responsible for his studen'ts mentality ? to what extent ???

very curious of your answers on taht one

Shine on
Cass


"I want brown bread... no, that is diesel oil..."
"So I was raised in Europe, where History comes from ..."
"NON !!! La Plume de mon oncle n est pas Bingibangibungi !!!"

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lightbug


member
Location: arizona

Total posts: 321
Posted:i took Tae Kwon do for a few years and kinda took that in my own direction. next i want ju jitsu or some other good grappling style.

drugs.. rock and roll. bad ass.. vegas hoes.. late night. booty calls.. shiny disco balls!!

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lightbug


member
Location: arizona

Total posts: 321
Posted:in response to your very interesting question cass, i say yes. when someone truely passes knowledge to me its more then just technical know how. i always take i bit of there spirit and outlook on life. plus in all that time training a teacher can create an atmosphere either negative one or a positive one.. thats my thoughts anyway...

drugs.. rock and roll. bad ass.. vegas hoes.. late night. booty calls.. shiny disco balls!!

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bender
GOLD Member since Nov 2001

still can't believe it's not butter
Location: Melbourne, Australia

Total posts: 6979
Posted:quote:Originally posted by lightbug:
when someone truely passes knowledge to me its more then just technical know how. i always take i bit of there spirit and outlook on life. the greatest wisdom encompasses internal and external development. I have seen the weakest children in the greatest practioners i've yet seen, even some who have quit practicing martial arts when their mental development caused them to recognise the fear and intolerance in their reasons for practicing martial arts (my astral projection lecturer was an accomplished martial artist) I'm glas that at least lightbug has identified this mischief.
yes, more chi, train harder! but it applies equally as much to the mind also.


Laugh Often, Smile Much, Post lolcats Always

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SmallBoy - x


SmallBoy - x

Carpal \'Tunnel
Location: London

Total posts: 2737
Posted:I've done 18 months of Tae-Kwon-Do, 3 months Shotokan Karate, 9 months Kick boxing and then 9 months of Ninjitsu.

Would like to know if anyone else does stuff (anything) in London area so I have someone's hand to hold when I go first time, otherwise I'll be starting Win-Chun in a few weeks on my own.



Small Lardy Person In Disguise

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THE UNITED CHAINS OF FIRE


member
Location: London

Total posts: 192
Posted:i watch the power rangers....is that included??

I don't dance. I move to music - Some dumb schmuck, Blue Peter 16/9/02-------------------This morning, I sat on the TV and I watched the Sofa

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bender
GOLD Member since Nov 2001

still can't believe it's not butter
Location: Melbourne, Australia

Total posts: 6979
Posted:quote:Originally posted by THE UNITED CHAINS OF FIRE:
i watch the power rangers....is that included??heh heh only if ya make that wacky noise that those dudes in grey jumpsuits make when they get caned by the dudes in the colourful jumpsuits..


Laugh Often, Smile Much, Post lolcats Always

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phherri


stranger
Location: DC metro - USA

Total posts: 7
Posted:UPDATED

My son, 12 yrs old, uses POI as a martial arts demo routine for Tae Kwon Do.

He is self taught and combines POI with TKD techniques.

His POI are made of two blue lacrosse balls (about 400 grams each) silver "eye" screws, stainless steal chain (12") and handles from silver triple stitched webbing. (about $18 for the pair) and they look good. Wish I could find a local source for the acrylic balls and a way to attach them to the chain or nylon cord.

Here is a link to a video of his latest tournament where he placed 1st.




EDITED_BY: phherri (1301937073)


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Posted:Not ALL martial arts origionated from India

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Posted:Nobody has mentioned Brazilian Jiu-Juitsu, Pancration, Krav maga, Muay Thia, Eskrima,Savate,Silat, Sambo, Some of which origionate from Russia, Greece, Israel, etc.I myself am beginning to learn brazilian jiu-juitu.

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Fine_Rabid_Dog


Internet Hate Machine
Location: They seek him here, they seek ...

Total posts: 10530
Posted:Originally Posted By: phherri
https://www.facebook.com/video/video.php?v=1942921972496&comments
br>

Unavailable dude to privacy settings. Which is a shame, cuz this sounds siiiick.


The existance of flamethrowers says that someone, somewhere, at sometime said "I need to set that thing on fire, but it's too far away."

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Posted:Brazilian jiu jitsu, muay Thai and traditional boxing. The only other martial art I respect is krav maga. Nothing else really seems that practical. But I used to compete so I had very little use for unrealistic dances or unbalanced flashy kicks, or the use of ancient, often illegal weapons.

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aston
SILVER Member since Dec 2007

aston

Unofficial Chairperson of Squirrel Defense League
Location: South Africa

Total posts: 4061
Posted:Goju-Ryu and aikido. Not going to get involved in defending kata, whatever floats your boat.

Also done a bit of quarterstaff work.


'We're all mad here. I'm mad, you're mad." [said the Cat.]
"How do you know I'm mad?" said Alice.
"You must be," said the Cat, "Or you wouldn't have come here."
- Lewis Carroll, Alice's Adventures In Wonderland

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meshunderlay
BRONZE Member since Sep 2008

meshunderlay

Juggler/Spinner
Location: Hicksville, New York, USA

Total posts: 612
Posted:I go in for chinese martial arts, but I would like to comment on the Originally Posted By: David_Thomas1Not ALL martial arts origionated from India quote here....

I beleive most martial arts ideas, same with religious ideas, all started in one area and spread. As they spread they changed slightly and at times more extremely. India happens to be one of the places that you can trace many other Asian MA styles to.
I'm not 100% sure on other styles.


Also, on the comment of Originally Posted By: QuestHBut I used to compete so I had very little use for unrealistic dances or unbalanced flashy kicks, or the use of ancient, often illegal weapons. I beleive, as is in the name, that these fighting styles are an Art form. Yes, some of the moves may seem a little less than useful in a real life situation, but they also teach very important ideas that help you better understand fighting in general.

On a side note, I have to say one of my favorite (for comedy purposes) martial artists is Bas Rutten.


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meshunderlay
BRONZE Member since Sep 2008

meshunderlay

Juggler/Spinner
Location: Hicksville, New York, USA

Total posts: 612
Posted:On a side SIDE note, really, on the note replying to the OP, I learned some wushu based on ape and crane styles. I also learned some Jiu Jitsu, and a few traditional boxing moves.
I would like to learn tai chi and wing chun eventually.


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Seaspray


Seaspray

stranger by the day
Location: At the Back of the North Wind

Total posts: 924
Posted:speaking as an armchair expert here, (only do Muay Thai and by no means consider myself expert :P) as I understand it, stuff like Kata is mostly to help teach a technique, it's footwork and how to transition into it, right?

Just a dancer in the dark

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aston
SILVER Member since Dec 2007

aston

Unofficial Chairperson of Squirrel Defense League
Location: South Africa

Total posts: 4061
Posted:Seaspray: I may have a slightly unusual view of things, but to me, kata teaches you combinations in an ideal environment. But if done blindly, then it is not much more than a dance, granted. You need to understand what each movement is meant to achieve: is it something that is affecting someone's guard, is it meant to cover something from a previous move, is it a lock, is it a strike, etc.

Again, I am coming at this from a Goju-Ryu background, and am certainly no expert, but I feel that there is a lot more to kata than people realise. It is possible (with a partner helps) to do each move of pretty much all the kata I have learned as strikes. (Mostly since blocks = strikes with a different intent, at least as I understand it in Goju-Ryu.) It is also possible to use many movements (especially of more advanced kata) as locks and throws. I feel that you could probably devote years of study to a single kata, and if it is well thought out, should be able to respond to any given offensive movement with something from that kata.

At the same time, you learn where you are strong and where your weight needs to be to do something.

Again, this might not be an orthodox view of it, but it is mine. Happy to see what other people feel.


'We're all mad here. I'm mad, you're mad." [said the Cat.]
"How do you know I'm mad?" said Alice.
"You must be," said the Cat, "Or you wouldn't have come here."
- Lewis Carroll, Alice's Adventures In Wonderland

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meshunderlay
BRONZE Member since Sep 2008

meshunderlay

Juggler/Spinner
Location: Hicksville, New York, USA

Total posts: 612
Posted:Originally Posted By: astonSeaspray: I may have a slightly unusual view of things, but to me, kata teaches you combinations in an ideal environment. But if done blindly, then it is not much more than a dance, granted. You need to understand what each movement is meant to achieve: is it something that is affecting someone's guard, is it meant to cover something from a previous move, is it a lock, is it a strike, etc.

Again, I am coming at this from a Goju-Ryu background, and am certainly no expert, but I feel that there is a lot more to kata than people realise. It is possible (with a partner helps) to do each move of pretty much all the kata I have learned as strikes. (Mostly since blocks = strikes with a different intent, at least as I understand it in Goju-Ryu.) It is also possible to use many movements (especially of more advanced kata) as locks and throws. I feel that you could probably devote years of study to a single kata, and if it is well thought out, should be able to respond to any given offensive movement with something from that kata.

At the same time, you learn where you are strong and where your weight needs to be to do something.

Again, this might not be an orthodox view of it, but it is mine. Happy to see what other people feel.

I second this post. Initially some things that look like strikes in a kata might also be used as throws, blocks, joint locks, etc etc... You just really need to look deeper.


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Posted:They did not all start in the same area then spread

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