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Rainbowmary
BRONZE Member since Mar 2009

Rainbowmary

Newbie
Location: Oregon, USA

Total posts: 19
Posted:I was wondering if someone here could point me to a resource that explains the different terminology in poi (ie: reels, planes, beats and whatnot). I've tried googling but I'm not coming up with much. I was thinking of purchasing the poi book that they have on the store here, but I don't know if it includes that information.

There's just so much to learn that I want to make sure I am using the correct lingo! wink

Thanks Much!
RM


*Insert poignant and emotionally relevant song lyric here*

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Mother_Natures_Son
SILVER Member since Aug 2007

Mother_Natures_Son

Rampant whirler.
Location: Geelong, Victoria, Australia!

Total posts: 2418
Posted:Some of this will be beyond what you're after, Rainbowmary, but you may well want it in the future and I think it'd be beneficial to read over and start to think about even if you arent attempting half of it.

BASICS

A beat is a single poi rotation.

Timing: Same time is when the poi move together. When the left poi is at the top of its rotation, so is the left.

Split time is when the poi are at exact opposite parts of their rotation to one another... when the left is up the right will be down.


A plane is an imaginary line that your poi runs on. Picture standing in a tic tac toe box, standing in the centre square.

The lines running along by your sides is a wheel plane, the ones in front and behind are wall planes.

If you do a figure 8 in front of you as you do with a 2 beat weave, but using one poi only you're doing it in a wheel plane.

If you keep doing that and turn your body to face another plane... then its in a wall plane.

If you're doing a figure 8 in a wall plane this is called a 'reel'

You can also have a horizontal plane, as with a corkscrew.

But then if you look at the buzzsaw, its almost as though its another plane. I refer to it as the buzzsaw plane, though a lot of others have referred to it as being a part of the wheel plane.

Why don't I agree with that? Buzzsaw flowers, thats why... its a buzzsaw, wall plane movement.

A stall is when the poi comes to a stop and then continues. You can either move in the same direction or in a new direction when performing a stall.

A pendulum is a movement that involves doing two of the simplest kind of stall. In this motion a poi will reach a 3 o clock position and then come to a stop, will then move in the opposite direction through the middle of the clock until it reaches the 9 o clock position (Without touching any other number) and then continues back along the numbers 3-9 where it performs the same maneuver again.


Isolation is when you make part of the poi stay in one place . . .

Technically speaking if you're just spinning the poi you could call it a handle or hand isolation, because your hand doesnt move!

But usually an isolation refers to getting the centre of the tether to stay in the same place with the head and the hand moving on the same circle.

You can also do a "point isolation" with the HEAD staying in the same position. It must be noted that I have never seen anyone do this for even a whole beat, most I've seen is a 3/4 beat, it would be impractical to your spinning to even attempt to get full beats, I think... but if you have oodles of skill and feel you know a way you could work it in, feel free to try!

Isolations take a lot of practice.



A unit circle (as far as I am aware) is the length of the poi, its the smallest circle that your poi can make, if you do a point isolation your HAND makes a big circle and if you're doing a normal spin, the head makes a big circle.

Thats the poi interactions with a bit of hand interaction...





ARMS

Just as you can move your poi in different combinations you can also move your arms in different combinations.

Look here.

I forget which ones I do but I KNOW I do split time opposites. You can actually do same time opposites also, but I omitted this because I like people to be able to work these things out for themselves, gives a nice little giddy boost as well as displaying that they've clicked something else into place.


All these classifications are about interactions... so far we've covered how poi interact in accordance to one another and how the poi interact with the poi they're on. . .

But just remember that the interactions are universal, anything reacting with anything else.

This was SLIGHTLY covered in isolations, but I left it out for fun... we'll go back to it soon.



FLOWERS are poi-arm interactions, both poi and arm will be doing circles.

When we talk about flowers theres Antispin and the other one, has a number of names, theres a thread thread about this I think I like Prospin myself.

Prospin is when the arm and the poi move in the same direction.
ex. Poi and Arm both moving forward
Antispin is when the arm and poi move in OPPOSITE directions.
ex Poi moving forward and Arm moving backward.

The number of 'petals' depend on the ratio of poi rotations to arm rotations.

1:1 prospin would create whats called an "extension" this means that you just spin the poi and the arm at the same rate in the same direction so the poi looks like an extension of your arm.

Adding more poi rotations into the mix will create more petals.

2:1 (Poi to arm) will create 1 petal and a big circle.
3:1 two petals.

Prospin always has ONE more poi rotation than 'petals' as the last one completes the circle round the outside if you wanted to think about it like that.

Antispin has one more petal than poi rotation. 3:1 is 4 petals. 2:1 is 3 petals, the reason being that the arm moving in the opposite direction will cause the poi to meet the rest of its pattern earlier.

Hard to explain that one in text, but it is the case.

1:1 antispin will create this. This is called a cateye.



This link has both isolation and a cateye. This shows how they are both the same ratio just one is antispin the other is not.


Hum drum drum drum... I think thats quite enough. Anything else?


MISC

Linear Isolations or lines are movements that cause the poi (Can be singular) to move along a straight line, the most common of which are vertical vertical and horizontal lines as with a plus sign. + smile The poi can either move back along that line or at the tip of each of the lines the direction can be changed to a diagonal like this which could draw a box around the plus sign. Any movement from each of these points or even point in the middle are while very difficult is possible.

A linear isolation is usually done with a stall and a partial point isolation or an extended cateye type motion or more commonly both.

Seorita Pineapple Pete has some good line isolation demos here or you could just click back to the start of the line iso vid just above. grin

EDITED_BY: Mother_Natures_Son (1240226025)


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Mother_Natures_Son
SILVER Member since Aug 2007

Mother_Natures_Son

Rampant whirler.
Location: Geelong, Victoria, Australia!

Total posts: 2418
Posted:I'll also add that its not REQUIRED to think about everything like this... Especially the ratios, you don't have to understand how the different ratios create different numbers of petals, this could be confusing to some people, its usually easier to count the petals and go off the feeling. Using light light a glow poi can help you count the petals. smile

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aston
SILVER Member since Dec 2007

aston

Unofficial Chairperson of Squirrel Defense League
Location: South Africa

Total posts: 4061
Posted:MNS: Very nice post. wink

Rainbowmary: Note that depending on where you are from, people might use a different term for prospin. I have heard spin-spin, some people use spin, other hyper- or super-spin. They are all the same thing though. There is a thread on this somewhere in the staff section....

Also: Pendulums are where the poi swings, rather than spins.


'We're all mad here. I'm mad, you're mad." [said the Cat.]
"How do you know I'm mad?" said Alice.
"You must be," said the Cat, "Or you wouldn't have come here."
- Lewis Carroll, Alice's Adventures In Wonderland

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Mother_Natures_Son
SILVER Member since Aug 2007

Mother_Natures_Son

Rampant whirler.
Location: Geelong, Victoria, Australia!

Total posts: 2418
Posted:Oh my! Forgot stall as well. I'll add them both in now.

Thanks for both the kudos and the reminder on pendulums.

I mentioned that in the post, aston, but I'll grab the link to put in, too.


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Chloe'
GOLD Member since Jan 2009

Chloe'

enthusiast
Location: SouthDakota, USA

Total posts: 324
Posted:Also-most of these have been posted by members in videos if you need a visual.

Listen to Your heartbeat and dance...

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Mother_Natures_Son
SILVER Member since Aug 2007

Mother_Natures_Son

Rampant whirler.
Location: Geelong, Victoria, Australia!

Total posts: 2418
Posted:I added Linear Isolations. That may have been going over the top.

There are plenty of threads available on the forums, but these are some nice things that you could think about and search for if you're having trouble searching without the terminology.


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aston
SILVER Member since Dec 2007

aston

Unofficial Chairperson of Squirrel Defense League
Location: South Africa

Total posts: 4061
Posted:heheh.

I think it may have been. But this is a useful thread nonetheless.

So well done. smile :thumbsup:


'We're all mad here. I'm mad, you're mad." [said the Cat.]
"How do you know I'm mad?" said Alice.
"You must be," said the Cat, "Or you wouldn't have come here."
- Lewis Carroll, Alice's Adventures In Wonderland

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Seye
SILVER Member since Mar 2005

Seye

Geek
Location: Manchester, UK

Total posts: 1261
Posted:Nice descriptions smile

There's more definitions and links in the Glossary.
grin


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Fine_Rabid_Dog


Internet Hate Machine
Location: They seek him here, they seek ...

Total posts: 10530
Posted:This is a thread that blatently needs a stickying and further editions.

Its learn-tastic!


The existance of flamethrowers says that someone, somewhere, at sometime said "I need to set that thing on fire, but it's too far away."

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Malcolm
SAPPHIRE Member since Nov 2003

Malcolm

HOP admin
Location: Christchurch, New Zealand

Total posts: 1017
Posted:I've put this into the Learn section of the site
Easy to edit and stuff
See Poi terminology


May your balls always burn

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Mother_Natures_Son
SILVER Member since Aug 2007

Mother_Natures_Son

Rampant whirler.
Location: Geelong, Victoria, Australia!

Total posts: 2418
Posted:Originally Posted By: SeyeNice descriptions smile

There's more definitions and links in the Glossary.
grin


There are some more in there. . . but I can't help but think it'd just get more cluttered than it is, I can add some more no worries if people would like them summed up in a similar way but I can't help but think its an information overload already.

Thanks to all for the kudos, by the way. I wasn't doing my assignment so I'm glad people found it useful. grin


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Rainbowmary
BRONZE Member since Mar 2009

Rainbowmary

Newbie
Location: Oregon, USA

Total posts: 19
Posted:Wow thanks everyone so much for your help!! I wasn't able to check in this weekend but I've got a lot of reading to do. I appreciate everyone's work to help out this newbie.
HoP Forever!! clap grouphug

Malcom, what a great site and members you have! Kudos!

EDITED_BY: Rainbowmary (1240347796)


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hamamelis
BRONZE Member since Jan 2006

hamamelis

nut.
Location: Bouncing off the walls.

Total posts: 756
Posted:I don't think I've come across the 'wheel plane' before.. I've just heard it called a 'side plane'.. But I suppose everyone has their own terms..

THE MEEK WILL INHERIT THE EARTH!


If that's okay with you?

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aston
SILVER Member since Dec 2007

aston

Unofficial Chairperson of Squirrel Defense League
Location: South Africa

Total posts: 4061
Posted:I have heard both and use them interchangeably. Although mostly 'side' because 'wheel' can sometimes sound like 'wall'. Which is also 'front' as I understand it. Not quite sure why that is....

'We're all mad here. I'm mad, you're mad." [said the Cat.]
"How do you know I'm mad?" said Alice.
"You must be," said the Cat, "Or you wouldn't have come here."
- Lewis Carroll, Alice's Adventures In Wonderland

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Mother_Natures_Son
SILVER Member since Aug 2007

Mother_Natures_Son

Rampant whirler.
Location: Geelong, Victoria, Australia!

Total posts: 2418
Posted:I think I've used side wall plane and front wall plane before, referring to myself as being inside a room but I've since abandoned that because it can be confusing when you're explaining it to someone.They'd end up getting them mixed up. I found it better to use two different terms that sound nothing alike.

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aston
SILVER Member since Dec 2007

aston

Unofficial Chairperson of Squirrel Defense League
Location: South Africa

Total posts: 4061
Posted:*bump* for any newbies floating around who have not stumbled across the link in the library, since this answers many basic questions.

No charge. smile

(Also added a couple lines to the editable one in the library.)


'We're all mad here. I'm mad, you're mad." [said the Cat.]
"How do you know I'm mad?" said Alice.
"You must be," said the Cat, "Or you wouldn't have come here."
- Lewis Carroll, Alice's Adventures In Wonderland

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gita
SILVER Member since Oct 2003

gita

.:*distracted by shiny things*:.
Location: brizvegas

Total posts: 3776
Posted:aww...good on you aston! saves peoples running about saying "do a durbs!" or linking to stuff! grin hug

do not meddle in the affairs of dragons, for you are crunchy and good to eat!

if at first you do succeed, try not to look too astonished!

smile! grin it confuses people!

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Ash3s
SILVER Member since Feb 2011

Ash3s

member
Location: Durban South Africa

Total posts: 161
Posted:Another awesome thread smile This forum is full of awesomeness grin

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