Seye
Seye

Geek
Location: Manchester, UK
Member Since: 27th Mar 2005
Total posts: 1261
Posted:Exciting times this week for those of us interested in space and the origins of the universe.

First - Earlier today NASA launched Atlantis on an 11 day mission to service (including replacing the wide field camera with a new higher resolution one) Hubble. The shuttle is due to reach Hubble on Wednesday.
This should allow Hubble to give us one final run astounding images of the universe.

Secondly - The European Space Agency is launching its Herschel and Planck observatories on Thursday.
If all goes well Herschel will give us the most detailed infrared images of space ever seen and Planck will survey minute fluctuations in the cosmic microwave background radiation. This should allow us to understand the state of the universe just 380,000 years after the big bang and see distortions in spacetime itself.

I feel like a child at Christmas with all of this happening so close together!


Delete Topic

Mother_Natures_Son
Mother_Natures_Son

Rampant whirler.
Location: Geelong, Victoria, Australia!
Member Since: 1st Aug 2007
Total posts: 2418
Posted:Happy Christmas, Seye. It does sound delish, composite images are lush. smile

hug

Delete

aston
aston

Unofficial Chairperson of Squirrel Defense League
Location: South Africa
Member Since: 2nd Dec 2007
Total posts: 4061
Posted:Seye: Agreed, it is awesome....

'We're all mad here. I'm mad, you're mad." [said the Cat.]
"How do you know I'm mad?" said Alice.
"You must be," said the Cat, "Or you wouldn't have come here."
- Lewis Carroll, Alice's Adventures In Wonderland

Delete

simta
simta

compfuzzled
Location: hastings
Member Since: 11th Apr 2006
Total posts: 1182
Posted:did you see this


Non-Https Image Link


http://edition.cnn.com/2009/TECH/space/04/14/space.hand/index.html


"the geeks have got you" - Gayle

Delete

R0cketSh1p
yat daam - yee lek - saam gungfu

Member Since: 3rd Apr 2009
Total posts: 30
Posted:Originally Posted By: simtadid you see this


Non-Https Image Link


http://edition.cnn.com/2009/TECH/space/04/14/space.hand/index.html


thats all the proof I ever needed of God tongue2


Delete

R0cketSh1p
yat daam - yee lek - saam gungfu

Member Since: 3rd Apr 2009
Total posts: 30
Posted:Seve 3-400,000 years after the big bang is quite an ambiguouis statement, remind me how long ago the big bang was again?

Do you mean we can see the state of the universe 3-400,000 years ago?


Delete

aston
aston

Unofficial Chairperson of Squirrel Defense League
Location: South Africa
Member Since: 2nd Dec 2007
Total posts: 4061
Posted:R0cketSh1p:
No. 400,000 years after the big bang. I think current estimates put that at about 4 billion years ago.

And basically what happens is that because light moves at a finite speed in a vacumn, if something is sufficiently far away, the light takes a certain amount of time to get here. The analogy is with sound: you see someone chopping wood and hear the "thunk" after they have finished.

With light, you just need things to be (a lot) further away.

The Sun (Sol) is 8 light-minutes away. That is a measure of distance equal to about 150 million kilometers, and is enough that the light given off at the instant that you read this only arrives in 8 minutes time. The next nearest star (Alpha Centauri) is 4.6 light-years or so away (might be 4.2, can not remember off-hand). That means if it blew up now, the first we would know about it is in 4.6 years time (or 4.2 if I was right with my second guess), when the light has finally gotten here.

Extrapolate that to an object far enough away and you can, in effect, see billions of years into the past.

Make sense?


'We're all mad here. I'm mad, you're mad." [said the Cat.]
"How do you know I'm mad?" said Alice.
"You must be," said the Cat, "Or you wouldn't have come here."
- Lewis Carroll, Alice's Adventures In Wonderland

Delete

Mynci
Mynci

Macaque of all trades
Location: wombling free...
Member Since: 27th Apr 2005
Total posts: 8737
Posted:Originally Posted By: astonR0cketSh1p:
No. 400,000 years after the big bang. I think current estimates put that at about 4 billion years ago.


I thought it was even further than that, that's more like the age of the Earth, I believe universe has been narrowed down to 13-14 Billion years old. Down from the 20 billion previously thought. I was reading about the hubble project yesterday, about the delay of doing this and how the newer technology hopefully being installed will give even better images. Looks like a hard job, with some work being done on things not designed for repair in space.


A couple of balls short of a full cascade... or maybe a few cards short of a deck... we'll see how this all fans out.

Delete

R0cketSh1p
yat daam - yee lek - saam gungfu

Member Since: 3rd Apr 2009
Total posts: 30
Posted:yea that makes sense, I thought the unvierse would be ALOT older than 13-14 billions year though. That really doesnt make it very old at all by comparision, I thought 100's of trillions would've been a better estimation. But I'm not the scientist here ^^

Delete

aston
aston

Unofficial Chairperson of Squirrel Defense League
Location: South Africa
Member Since: 2nd Dec 2007
Total posts: 4061
Posted:Sorry. It is about 14 billion. I am used to thinking of the limit as four and bit due to being a geologist. My apologies.

But the rest looks about right. grin

R0cketSh1p: Not very old? Look here. Have not checked the numbers, but have seen many similar things.
One of my geology lecturers had a similar analogy for time since Earth's creation as a movie being played backwards at a year per frame, 24 frames per second. I think your would be sitting for about 16 days, but can not remember and do not feel like doing the maths right now. Will get back to you, unless you feel like doing it. tongue2
Anyway, using that analogy, to go back 3500 years (to where human history in many places gets rather sketchy) will take you 146 seconds or just under 2.5 minutes. wink
Christ is at around 83 seconds.

For all that geologists trot out a million years as being short (and it is, relative) it is anything but. Once your mind starts wrapping around how much can change in a million years, you really get a sense of it.

Try counting to a thousand at a constant rate. It would take you a thousand times longer to count to a million. And a thousand times longer than that to count to a billion. Think about it.

Deep time is called that for a very good reason....

Hopefully that all makes sense and I have not made too many errors....


'We're all mad here. I'm mad, you're mad." [said the Cat.]
"How do you know I'm mad?" said Alice.
"You must be," said the Cat, "Or you wouldn't have come here."
- Lewis Carroll, Alice's Adventures In Wonderland

Delete

Mynci
Mynci

Macaque of all trades
Location: wombling free...
Member Since: 27th Apr 2005
Total posts: 8737
Posted:The old theory for universal age was about 20 billion but has been re-worked using more up to date methods. looking back through 13 Billion years it quite impressive grin

Humans have been around about 40,000 years so humans have only existed for 1/350,000 of the age of the universe. nothing compared to Dinosairs 160 million year reign (although to be fair that IS more than 1 species) if we died out tomorrow we wouldn't even be a footnote in universal history everything we created would be gone in 10,000 years save a few bits of space junk like voyager speeding away.

Stars take approx 4-14 Million years to form (rough estimates taken on basis for dust clouds to collapse under gravity) which will be the kind of thing we will be hopefully able to view in beautiful shots like above. trust me 13 billion years is quite a long time wink even astronomically.


Edit -
For parity I had better mention, According to creationist theory, the Earth is in fact only about 6000 years old which is incredibly younger than stonehenge, about the age of the Pyramid of Khufu

EDITED_BY: Mynci (1242310669)
EDIT_REASON: parity lol


A couple of balls short of a full cascade... or maybe a few cards short of a deck... we'll see how this all fans out.

Delete

Durbs
Durbs

Classically British
Location: Epsom, Surrey, England
Member Since: 23rd Sep 2001
Total posts: 5688
Posted:Maybe God built them retrospectively to boost tourism? wink

Burner of Toast
Spinner of poi
Slacker of enormous magnitude

Delete

Seye
Seye

Geek
Location: Manchester, UK
Member Since: 27th Mar 2005
Total posts: 1261
Posted:Durbs - Or maybe as Bill Hicks said he is some kind of prankster wink

I'm really busy until next week but I will drop drop back into this topic as soon as I can to make a propper reply.

Just for the sake of interest I think the general concensus is that universe is currently about 13.7 billion (13,700,000,000) years old.

And, while I'm here... Happy birthday Dubs & Aston smile


Delete

aston
aston

Unofficial Chairperson of Squirrel Defense League
Location: South Africa
Member Since: 2nd Dec 2007
Total posts: 4061
Posted:Sounds like the idea behind Terry Pratchett's Strata....

Thanks Seye. smile


'We're all mad here. I'm mad, you're mad." [said the Cat.]
"How do you know I'm mad?" said Alice.
"You must be," said the Cat, "Or you wouldn't have come here."
- Lewis Carroll, Alice's Adventures In Wonderland

Delete


Similar Topics

Using the keywords [hubble herschel planck] we found the following similar topics.
1. Forums > Hubble, Herschel & Planck [13 replies]

     Show more..