• All Purchases made this month instantly go into the draw to win a USD $ 200.00 credit to your HoP account.
 

Forums > Social Discussion > Maori dislike of performance poi

Login/Join to Participate
Page: 1234
DarkFyre
DarkFyre

HoP mage and keeper of the fireballs
Location: Palmerston North
Member Since: 4th Nov 2005
Total posts: 1965
Posted:Ok i just thought that i would bring this up because i can.

Many (but not all) traditional Maori types seem to dislike our kind of poi and they seem to take it as offencive to there culture or something along those lines. There seems to be this ingrained view that if you are doing anything other than Kappa Haka with traditional precussion poi that you are somehow soiling their culture.

Just for one genuine example, i was on my way into town on Witangi day (NZ indipendance day if that helps non Kiwis understand it better) and i was spinning my poi as i went (when i passed sombody on the street i showed off a little bit) but when i passed this Maori woman she gave me a filthy look and with utter contempt in her voice said to her hubby loud enough for all to hear "look what they're doing with our poi" and i just couldn't understand wy she was so dissaproving of my spinning.

The flipside of this however is when they come up to you bold as brass and demand to spin because they are so much better at poi than you will ever be, they then proceed to hit themsleves in the head much to my amusement.

I've never understood this maori tendancy to say that anything they came up with is theirs and theirs alone so damn anybody that trys to addapt or improve upon it.

All this said and done the younger or less traditional Maori will either not care or be poi spinners that appreciate the growth that this artform has seen.


May my balls of fire set your balls on fire devil


_Clare_
_Clare_

Still wiggling
Location: Belfast
Member Since: 22nd Oct 2002
Total posts: 5967
Posted:smile

Nice one George and Malcolm... let us know how it goes...
x


Getting to the other side smile


FireTom
Stargazer

Member Since: 20th Sep 2003
Total posts: 6650
Posted:clap ditto

There are Europeans disliking what we do? eek confused Just from envy I suppose... umm

[dizzy: pls note the 3x wink )


the best smiles are the ones you lead to wink


Sealey
member

Member Since: 17th Apr 2007
Total posts: 30
Posted: Written by: _Clare_


smile

I think it's quite sad that we haven't found a better way to bring together old and new traditions...

It feels a bit like we've taken something, changed it and not made enough of an effort to pay respect to it's heritage.

(or, I could just be overly-sentimental, again)

Didj and poi are two examples... perhaps djembe would be another...

Hmm... But what to do about it?



We should do nothing. Why should we not do something we enjoy because they "did it first". That's like saying The Restarts shouldn't be a punk band because they weren't around in the 70's (when the punk movement began).



FireTom
Stargazer

Member Since: 20th Sep 2003
Total posts: 6650
Posted:Fair point - maybe it's because it sounded as if we'd offend them? And because (most of us) have deepest respect for Maori (culture)?

Not an easy one... Sure, we can just tell "them" (whoever that is) to get off our backs, but IMHO we should find consent and a way in which everybodies concern is recognized.

Too many times the west has neglected, abused and deminished cultural heritage already.

Maybe it's because we just care (too much) wink


the best smiles are the ones you lead to wink


georgemc
georgemc

Sitting down facing forward . . .
Location: Christchurch
Member Since: 16th Oct 2006
Total posts: 2387
Posted:Leave it to us - we're making sure the bridge between the 2 worlds is firmly in place. And over the next few weeks/months/years, we'll be making sure the bridge is robust and safe for all users (except maybe there'll need to be a weight limit? wink ).

Of course, in the meantime, everyone can demonstrate their own personal respect whenever a situation arises and if it gets too personal/emotional/heated, well, at least you can point to the likes of this thread and say that someone is doing something and therefore we (collectively) take the subject seriously.

cheers
George


Written by: Doc Lightning talking about Marmite in Kichi's Intro thread

I have several large jars of the stuff. I actually like it... a little. And don't tell anyone I admitted to it.
grin


Mr Majestik
Mr Majestik

coming to a country near you
Location: home of the tiney toothy bear
Member Since: 9th Mar 2004
Total posts: 4693
Posted: Written by: georgemc


Leave it to us - we're making sure the bridge between the 2 worlds is firmly in place. And over the next few weeks/months/years, we'll be making sure the bridge is robust and safe for all users (except maybe there'll need to be a weight limit? wink ).



a weight limit, and flame retardant wink


"but have you considered there is more to life than your eyelids?"

jointly owned by Fire_Spinning_Angel and Blu_Valley


_Clare_
_Clare_

Still wiggling
Location: Belfast
Member Since: 22nd Oct 2002
Total posts: 5967
Posted:Thanks George

x


Getting to the other side smile


DeepSoulSheep
DeepSoulSheep

Carpal \'Tunnel
Location: Berlin
Member Since: 25th Sep 2002
Total posts: 2617
Posted:I've played fire poi with a Maori man in Gisborne.

What do I win wink

It was the dragony one he may be about here somewhere, it'd be nice if he chimed in cool

Ohhhhh Drrraaaagggooonnnnn!!!!

Oh dear look what I've gone and done now eek


I live in a world of infinite possibilities.


Tu Wahine
Tu Wahine

newbie
Location: New Zealand
Member Since: 21st Feb 2012
Total posts: 39
Posted:Man as I was reading this thread and only being a newbie I was thinking should I comment or not.
As a Tu Wahine of Ngati Kahungunu descent I cant help myself. Some maori, not all take offence at any use of poi their reasons are usually around what they perceive to be the theft of their cultural identity, not unlike people wearing Ta moko without any understanding of the meaning they portray. This is gradually changing and Maori as a whole are very welcoming but get a bit pee'd off with generalisations such as this thread!! DarkFyre: may i suggest that it could be because of your own hang-ups that you get this negative response, especially if you are coming across the way you do on this thread!!

Poi was traditionally used by both men and women, the use of weapons for women was dependant on the Iwi - tribe that you belonged to. In my Iwi for instance women were expected to fight when required and records show that the women followed the men into battle to dispatch (kill) anyone left alive after the first wave. I was taught poi when I was about 2yrs and taught the patu (wooden club) shortly after that. Poi was used to both strengthen the wrist and arm, improve eye hand co-ordination, and when the killings done it was good for entertainment.

Each Iwi has their own traditions so they may differ dependant on who you talk with.
As for me and I am a traditionalist - I think its great that people all over the world have developed their own forms of this art, but an understanding of the origins is appreciated but not expected.

Ive added this video in another topic but here is an example of a male use of poi which hopefully answers some of the other questions on this thread, they are appreciated for their total use of body poi and voice.
Enjoy



EDITED_BY: Tu Wahine (1330039946)


Nui atu te mihi ki nga mahi o te po, nga waiata, nga poi, me nga haka taparahi.


Tu Wahine
Tu Wahine

newbie
Location: New Zealand
Member Since: 21st Feb 2012
Total posts: 39
Posted:For Maori poi is more then just a performance, as we had no written language our history was through song and dance and taught through the generations and some are considered sacred and poi provides a direct link with our ancestors.

Here is a link to documentary in regards to this, it is in Maori but does have subtitles.







EDITED_BY: Tu Wahine (1330635832)


Nui atu te mihi ki nga mahi o te po, nga waiata, nga poi, me nga haka taparahi.


Page: 1234