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Doc Lightning
Doc Lightning

HOP Mad Doctor
Location: San Francisco, CA, USA
Member Since: 28th May 2001
Total posts: 13919
Posted:In case anyone was interested. I've included some editorial comments in italics. And no, this is not a joke.

NTP CHEMICAL REPOSITORY (RADIAN CORPORATION, AUGUST 29, 1991)
WATER

-IDENTIFIERS
===========

*CATALOG ID NUMBER: 001573

*CAS NUMBER: 7732-18-5

*BASE CHEMICAL NAME: WATER

*PRIMARY NAME: WATER

*CHEMICAL FORMULA: H2O

*STRUCTURAL FORMULA: H2O

*WLN: QH

*SYNONYMS:
DIHYDROGEN OXIDE
WATER, DISTILLED
ICE
STEAM
SNOW
HYDROGEN OXIDE

-PHYSICAL CHEMICAL DATA
======================

*PHYSICAL DESCRIPTION: LITERATURE: Clear colorless liquid
REPOSITORY: Clear colorless liquid

*MOLECULAR WEIGHT: 18.02

*SPECIFIC GRAVITY: 0.997 @ 25/4 C [031]

*DENSITY: 0.995 g/mL @ 32 C [205]

*MP (DEG C): Not available

*BP (DEG C): 90 C @ 525.97 mm Hg [205]

*SOLUBILITIES:
WATER : >=100 mg/mL @ 19 C (RAD) Gee, water dissolves in water? Ya don't say...

DMSO : >=100 mg/mL @ 19 C (RAD)

95% ETHANOL : >=100 mg/mL @ 19 C (RAD)

METHANOL : Not available

ACETONE : >=100 mg/mL @ 19 C (RAD)

TOLUENE : Not available

OTHER SOLVENTS: Not available

*VOLATILITY:
Vapor pressure: 23.756 mm Hg @ 25.0 C [205]
Vapor density : >1 [058]

*FLAMMABILITY(FLASH POINT):
Flash point data for this chemical are not available; however, it is nonflammable. Fires involving this material can be controlled with a dry chemical, carbon dioxide or Halon extinguisher. A water spray may also be used [058]. So it's not flammable, but just in case it catches on fire put it out with a water spray? Uh...right.

*UEL: Not available LEL: Not available

*REACTIVITY: Not available

*STABILITY:
This chemical is stable under normal laboratory conditions [058]. Solutions of this chemical in water, DMSO, 95% ethanol or acetone should be stable for 24 hours under normal laboratory conditions (RAD).

*OTHER PHYSICAL DATA:
Density: 0.958 g/mL @ 100 C [205]
Boiling point: 80 C @ 355.40 mm Hg; 95 C @ 634.06 mm Hg [205]
Odorless [043,058,062,295]
Tasteless [043,295]
Weak electrolyte [062]
Dipole moment: 1.76 @ 25 C (in benzene) [031]; 1.86 @ 25 C (in dioxane) [031]
Surface tension: 75.83 dynes/cm @ 0 C; 72.88 dynes/cm @ 20 C [205]
Refractive index: 1.33395 @ 0 C; 1.33300 @ 20 C; 1.33194 @ 30 C [205]
Triple point: 273.16 K @ 4.6 mm Hg [062]
Critical temperature: 374.2 C [031]
Critical pressure: 218 atmospheres [031]
Dielectric constant: 87.74 @ 0 C [031,205]; 80.10 @ 20 C [205]; 76.55 @ 30 C
[205]
Latent heat of condensation: 540 cal/g [043]
Bulk density: 8.337 lbs/gal (62.3 lb/cu ft) [043]
Surface tension: 73 dynes/cm @ 20 C [043]
Evaporation rate (n-butyl acetate=1): 0.4 [043]
Viscosity: 0.01002 poise @ 20 C [043,062]
Latent heat of fusion: 80 cal/g [043]

-TOXICITY
========

*NIOSH REGISTRY NUMBER: ZC0110000

*TOXICITY: apparently they got these LD50 values by injecting animals with pure water until they died. Yeah, that'll happen if you do it quickly enough. This was worth money for a study and the (likely unpleasant) death of lab animals?
typ. dose mode specie amount units other
LD50 ipr mus 190 gm/kg
LD50 ivn mus 25 gm/kg
LDLo ivn rbt 13 gm/kg
LDLo orl cat 320 gm/kg
LDLo orl dog 629 gm/kg
LDLo orl gpg 429 gm/kg
TDLo orl inf 333 gm/kg
TDLo orl man 42.86 gm/kg
LDLo orl rbt 368 gm/kg
LDLo rec rbt 450 gm/kg
LDLo rec wmn 180 gm/kg/28H

*AQTX/TLM96: Not available

*SAX TOXICITY EVALUATION:
THR: Human systemic effects by ingestion of very large amounts. Human and
experimental death reported by various routes at sufficiently large
doses.

*CARCINOGENICITY: Not available

*MUTATION DATA:
test lowest dose | test lowest dose
----------- ----------------- | ----------- -----------------
Not available |

*TERATOGENICITY: Not available

*STANDARDS, REGULATIONS & RECOMMENDATIONS:
OSHA: None
ACGIH: None
NIOSH Criteria Document: None
NFPA Hazard Rating: Health (H): None
Flammability (F): None
Reactivity (R): None

*OTHER TOXICITY DATA:
Status: EPA Genetox Program 1988, Inconclusive: B subtilis rec assay
EPA TSCA Chemical Inventory, 1986
Meets criteria for proposed OSHA Medical Records Rule

-OTHER DATA (Regulatory)
=======================

*PROPER SHIPPING NAME (IATA): Not restricted

*UN/ID NUMBER:

*HAZARD CLASS: SUBSIDIARY RISK: PACKING GROUP:

*LABELS REQUIRED:

*PACKAGING: PASSENGER: PKG. INSTR.: MAXIMUM QUANTITY:
CARGO : PKG. INSTR.: MAXIMUM QUANTITY:

*SPECIAL PROVISIONS:

*USES:
This compound is used as a solvent, suspending agent, industrial coolant, diluent, moderator in nuclear reactors, nutrient substance and power source. It is also used in beer and carbonated beverages, hydration of lime, paper coatings, textile processing, debarking logs, filtration, washing and scouring, sulfur mining, hydrolysis, Portland cement, hydraulic systems, steam generation and in the food industry. Wow, handy stuff! Where can I get some?

*COMMENTS: Not available

-HANDLING PROCEDURES
===================

*ACUTE/CHRONIC HAZARDS:
Information concerning acute hazards of this chemical is not available.

*MINIMUM PROTECTIVE CLOTHING: Not available

*RECOMMENDED GLOVE MATERIALS:
Permeation Test Results For The Neat (Undiluted) Chemical:

The permeation test results for the neat (undiluted) chemical are given below. The breakthrough times of this chemical are given for each glove type tested. The table is a presentation of actual test results, not specific recommendations or suggestions. Avoid glove types which exhibit breakthrough times of less than the anticipated task time plus an adequate safety factor. If this chemical makes direct contact with your glove, or if a tear, puncture or hole develops, replace them at once.

Glove Type Model Number Thickness Breakthrough Time
Butyl rubber North B-161 0.71 mm 480 min
Neoprene Edmont 29-870 0.48 mm 480 min
Viton North F-091 0.25 mm 480 min
Unknown North Silvershield 0.10 mm 480 min

*RECOMMENDED RESPIRATOR:
Where the neat test chemical is weighed and diluted, wear a NIOSH-approved half face respirator equipped with an organic vapor/acid gas cartridge (specific for organic vapors, HCl, acid gas and SO2) with a dust/mist filter. So you're not supposed to handle water in a lab without wearing a respirator. Beautiful.

*OTHER: Not available

*STORAGE PRECAUTIONS:
You should store this material at ambient temperatures.

*SPILLS AND LEAKAGE:
If you should spill this chemical, use absorbent paper to pick up all liquid spill material. Seal the absorbent paper, as well as any of your clothing which may be contaminated, in a vapor-tight plastic bag for eventual disposal. Wash any surfaces you may have contaminated with a soap and water solution. Do not reenter the contaminated area until the Safety Officer (or other responsible person) has verified that the area has been properly cleaned. So if you spill water, you are supposed to clean it up with absorbent towels, SEAL THEM IN A HAZMAT BAG, and then...wash the "contaminated" surfaces with...*sigh*

*DISPOSAL AND WASTE TREATMENT: Not available

-EMERGENCY PROCEDURES
====================

*SKIN CONTACT:
IMMEDIATELY flood affected skin with water while removing and isolating all contaminated clothing. Gently wash all affected skin areas thoroughly with soap and water.
If symptoms such as redness or irritation develop, IMMEDIATELY call a physician and be prepared to transport the victim to a hospital for treatment. So if you spill water on your skin, you are supposed to IMMEDIATELY wash it off with...riiiight.

*INHALATION:
IMMEDIATELY leave the contaminated area; take deep breaths of fresh air. If symptoms (such as wheezing, coughing, shortness of breath, or burning in the mouth, throat, or chest) develop, call a physician and be prepared to transport the victim to a hospital.
Provide proper respiratory protection to rescuers entering an unknown atmosphere. Whenever possible, Self-Contained Breathing Apparatus (SCBA) should be used; if not available, use a level of protection greater than or equal to that advised under Respirator Recommendation. Funny, when people inhale water it's called "drowning."

*EYE CONTACT:
First check the victim for contact lenses and remove if present. Flush victim's eyes with water or normal saline solution for 20 to 30 minutes while simultaneously calling a hospital or poison control center.
Do not put any ointments, oils, or medication in the victim's eyes without specific instructions from a physician.
If symptoms (such as redness or irritation) develop, immediately transport the victim to a hospital. So if I spill water in my eyes, I am supposed to flush my eyes with yet more water for 15 minutes?

*INGESTION:
DO NOT INDUCE VOMITING. If the victim is conscious and not convulsing, give 1 or 2 glasses of water to dilute the chemical and IMMEDIATELY call a hospital or poison control center. Be prepared to transport the victim to a hospital if advised by a physician.
If the victim is convulsing or unconscious, do not give anything by mouth, ensure that the victim's airway is open and lay the victim on his/her side with the head lower than the body. DO NOT INDUCE VOMITING. IMMEDIATELY transport the victim to a hospital. If the victim swallows water, give 1-2 glasses of water. But since the victim has swallowed water, you need to give 1-2 more glasses of water...and then 1-2 more...and then give the victim track shoes and an unobstructed path to the bathroom.

*SYMPTOMS:
Symptoms of exposure to this compound via eye contact include edema of the corneal stroma and epithelium (which increases sensitivity to glare) [099]. Other symptoms of exposure include headache and vomiting which may be followed by confusion, disorientation and restlessness progressing to convulsions and coma. It may also cause stupor [295]. It has reportedly caused tremors and muscle contraction or spasticity. In infants it may cause convulsions, effect on seizure threshold, hypermotility, diarrhea and increased body temperature [015]. It may also cause fever [043].
Symptoms of exposure in animals include hemolysis with or without anemia, convulsions and effect on seizure threshold [015]. I find this especially hilarious because this information IS accurate and specific to water. Just goes to show you how legal BSing and stuff can make even the most harmless of things sound incredibly dangerous.

-SOURCES
=======

*SOURCES:
[015] Lewis, R.J., Sr. and R.L. Tatken, Eds. Registry of Toxic Effects
of Chemical Substances. On-line Ed. National Institute for
Occupational Safety and Health. Cincinnati, OH. ZC0110000.
February 14, 1989.

[017] Weast, R.C., M.J. Astle, and W.H. Beyer, Eds. CRC Handbook of
Chemistry and Physics. 67th Ed. CRC Press, Inc. Boca Raton,
FL. 1986. p. B-94, #h63.

[031] Windholz, M., Ed. The Merck Index. 10th Ed. Merck and Co.
Rahway, NJ. 1983. p. 1441, #9853.

[038] Stull, D.R. Vapor pressure of pure substances: Organic Compounds.
Industrial and Engineering Chem. 39(4):517-550. 1947. p. 545.

[043] Sax, N.I. and Richard J. Lewis, Sr. Dangerous Properties of Industrial
Materials. 7th Ed. Van Nostrand Reinhold. New York. 1989.
Vol. III, p. 3487, #WAT259.

[058] Information Handling Services. Material Safety Data Sheets
Service. Microfiche Ed. Bimonthly Updates. February/March 1989.
#2606-586, A-13; #8362-001, F-13.

[062] Sax, N.I. and R.J. Lewis Sr., Eds. Hawley's Condensed Chemical
Dictionary. 11th Ed. Van Nostrand Reinhold. New York. 1987.
p. 1232.

[082] U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Office of Toxic Substances.
Toxic Substances Control Act Chemical Substance Inventory: 1985
Edition. 5 Vols. U.S. Environmental Protection Agency.
Washington, D.C. January 1986. Listed.

[099] Grant, W. Morton, M.D. Toxicology of the Eye. 3rd Ed. Charles
C. Thomas, Publisher. Springfield, IL. 1986. pp. 982-983.

[110] Oak Ridge National Laboratory. Environmental Mutagen Information
Center (EMIC), Bibliographic Data Base. Oak Ridge National
Laboratory. Oak Ridge, TN. Listed.

[120] Oak Ridge National Laboratory. Environmental Teratogen Information
Center (ETIC), Bibliographic Data Base. Oak Ridge National
Laboratory. Oak Ridge, TN. Listed.

[205] Dean, John A., Ed. Lange's Handbook of Chemistry. 13th Ed.
McGraw-Hill Book Company. New York. 1985. pp. 10-26, 10-54,
10-91, 10-99.

[275] Aldrich Chemical Company. Aldrich Catalog/Handbook of Fine
Chemical. Aldrich Chemical Co., Inc. Milwaukee, WI.
1988. p. 1540, #19,529-4.

[295] Reynolds, James E.F., Ed. Martindale The Extra Pharmacopoeia. 28th Ed.
The Pharmaceutical Press. London. 1982. pp. 1669-1670.

[455] The Pharmaceutical Society of Great Britain. The Pharmaceutical Codex.
11th Edition. The Pharmaceutical Press. London. 1979. pp. 991-992.

[610] Clansky, Kenneth B., Ed. Suspect Chemicals Sourcebook: A Guide to
Industrial Chemicals Covered Under Major Federal Regulatory and
Advisory Programs. Roytech Publications, Inc. Burlingame, CA.
1990. Not listed.

[620] United States National Toxicology Program. Chemical Status Report.
NTP Chemtrack System. Research Triangle Park, NC. November 6, 1990.
Not listed.

-------------------------------------------------------------


-Mike )'(
Certified Mad Doctor and HoP High Priest of Nutella

"A buckuht 'n a hooze!" -Valura


Kaji
Kaji

Quantum Theorist
Location: Vansterdam
Member Since: 12th Dec 2002
Total posts: 564
Posted:Um...... This has to be a joke. I think your BSing us Mike

In the 60's people took acid to make the world weird, now the world is weird and they take prozac to make it normal again.


Doc Lightning
Doc Lightning

HOP Mad Doctor
Location: San Francisco, CA, USA
Member Since: 28th May 2001
Total posts: 13919
Posted:Nope. This is not a joke. This MSDS has been taken off the source where I got it and has been replaced with a more sensible version, but this was a real MSDS for water.

Believe me, I've spent enough time working in labs that this is not at all surprising. My lord...you should have seen the MSDS for sodium chloride (salt). Or glucose, for that matter!


-Mike )'(
Certified Mad Doctor and HoP High Priest of Nutella

"A buckuht 'n a hooze!" -Valura


NYC
NYC

NYC
Location: NYC, NY, USA
Member Since: 26th Aug 2001
Total posts: 9232
Posted:Interesting, I checked my MSDS sources and it said that water was pretty harmless.

http://www.caymanchem.com/neptune/msdss/400000m.pdf
br>
is the downloadable pdf file but save yourself the trouble. It basically says that water is harmless, nonflammable and everything else you'd expect.

I'll check my merck index at home but I'm pretty sure that wherever you got your data is just plain wrong/irresponsable.

That's not the MSDS I got.

The MSDS for SAND on the other hand... (I know because we order that stuff here at school) IS pretty funny. "Severe eye irritant" and because it generates dust you need a resperator to work with it as well. And people always laugh at me while wearing my resperator at the beach.


Well, shall we go?
Yes, let's go.
[They do not move.]


Doc Lightning
Doc Lightning

HOP Mad Doctor
Location: San Francisco, CA, USA
Member Since: 28th May 2001
Total posts: 13919
Posted:NYC, this one is out of date, but it is for real. Came off chemweb.

-Mike )'(
Certified Mad Doctor and HoP High Priest of Nutella

"A buckuht 'n a hooze!" -Valura


toneman
member

Member Since: 18th Oct 2001
Total posts: 195
Posted:Damn, where can I get ahold of this Shiznit? It gots ta be illegal?


Charles
Charles

Corporate Circus Arts Entertainer
Location: Auckland
Member Since: 27th Jun 2001
Total posts: 3989
Posted:I thiunk both MikeG and NYC are likely to be correct.

If it was on a bonafide site for a period of time, that doesn't mean it wasn't written as a joke.

It may have accidentally or deliberately have been put up.

No chemist I know of would even consider writing instructions on how ot put out water that has caught on fire.

so yay! You are both right...


HoP Posting Guidelines
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Doc Lightning
Doc Lightning

HOP Mad Doctor
Location: San Francisco, CA, USA
Member Since: 28th May 2001
Total posts: 13919
Posted:Charles,

Chemists no, Lawyers...anything's possible. Including water fires.

The way it works is that most likely when the information is being entered, it is done into a form, that form was then used to generate the MSDS. Most likely, whoever was making this MSDS didn't have a "common sense" button on the form.

You should have seen the MSDS for ethanol! Or caffeine!


-Mike )'(
Certified Mad Doctor and HoP High Priest of Nutella

"A buckuht 'n a hooze!" -Valura


Bram....
member
Location: the arms of the Ganja Goddess
Member Since: 17th May 2002
Total posts: 1551
Posted:I wonder what the MSDS is for O2, that would be a good chuckle I am sure

You. Its whats for dinner!

As time passes, you realise all the mistakes you amde and the ones you wish you never did make.

The wave crashing on the beach


Bendy
member
Location: Adelaide, SA, Australia
Member Since: 29th Aug 2001
Total posts: 750
Posted:Bram they would definitely say that O2 is highly inflammable!

Courage is the man who can stop after only one peanut


Bram....
member
Location: the arms of the Ganja Goddess
Member Since: 17th May 2002
Total posts: 1551
Posted:for sure, and its also highly poisonous

You. Its whats for dinner!

As time passes, you realise all the mistakes you amde and the ones you wish you never did make.

The wave crashing on the beach


NYC
NYC

NYC
Location: NYC, NY, USA
Member Since: 26th Aug 2001
Total posts: 9232
Posted:I used to have this little presentation of "Dihydrogen Monoxide" (water) that I'd put up on my buletin boards about the dangers of Dihydrogen Monoxide...

A few that I remember are:
-Rarer solid form responsible for the sinking of the Titanic.
-US govt. has stockpiled pipes full of it under every major millitary base.
-Found in large proportions in cancer cells.
-Mark McGuire (pro baseball player) admitted to using it just before ball games.

Ooops... the bell just rang ending the school day which means I've got TWO WEEKS OFF!!!!!!

YIPEEE!

No more pencils, no more books, no more student's dirty looks!!!


Well, shall we go?
Yes, let's go.
[They do not move.]


Doc Lightning
Doc Lightning

HOP Mad Doctor
Location: San Francisco, CA, USA
Member Since: 28th May 2001
Total posts: 13919
Posted:Actually O2 is really poisonous. Our bodies have evolved all sorts of antoxidants so that we can selectively allow the stuff to react with our metabolic fuels without allowing it to damage the rest of our cells too much. Your average cell carries between 1,000 and 10,000 sites of oxygen damage on its DNA at any given moment. The fact that we don't all die of cancer at age 3 never ceases to amaze me. To counter oxygen toxicity, we have all sorts of anti-oxidants floating around (vitamins C and E, for example), catalase enzymes, DNA repair enzymes, etc. Some organisms (certain bacteria) are called "strict anerobes." They never evolved to tolerate oxygen and die on contact with the atmosphere for more than a minute or so.

One thing they teach us not to do is to give a patient 100% O2 if they are intubated. It's incredibly toxic to the lungs. After just a few days of 100% O2, you can start to see changes in the lungs that you would expect from someone who was smoking cigarettes for many years.

The other thing is that certain organs use oxygen levels as a means of regulating blood flow. Give too much oxygen and the organ can shut down its blood flow, thus killing itself. The brain, fortunately, uses CO2 levels, rather than O2 levels as its primary means of measuring blood flow. That's why you get dizzy when you hyperventilate. Hyperventilating causes you to blow off too much CO2, which causes the arterioles in your brain to contract to decrease blood flow, and so you get dizzy.

And O2 is flammable! Atmospheric oxygen is about 21%. If we had about 30% oxygen in the atmosphere, you could walk outside, hit a tree with a baseball bat, and the tree would burst into flames (yeah, that would be really cool, huh?).

Oxygen is one of those "watch out for too much of a good thing" things.

Ok, this post was way too geeky.

Um...anyone nailed any new moves lately?


-Mike )'(
Certified Mad Doctor and HoP High Priest of Nutella

"A buckuht 'n a hooze!" -Valura


Bram....
member
Location: the arms of the Ganja Goddess
Member Since: 17th May 2002
Total posts: 1551
Posted:Mike, you have too much time on your hands. Lucky bastard

You. Its whats for dinner!

As time passes, you realise all the mistakes you amde and the ones you wish you never did make.

The wave crashing on the beach


NYC
NYC

NYC
Location: NYC, NY, USA
Member Since: 26th Aug 2001
Total posts: 9232
Posted:I was with ya til the tree with a baseball bat.... I can't possibly believe that one.

Show me some evidence of that. Mostly because I want to pass it on to my students.

Even Apollo 1 took a good few minutes. And those guys didn't burn, they suffocated.

I certainly agree with the reactivity of O2. Pretty much governs this website, no?


Well, shall we go?
Yes, let's go.
[They do not move.]



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