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Forums > Help! > Calling out to all the artists

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{anthrax}
BRONZE Member since Aug 2004

{anthrax}

Look I've changed my title!
Location: England

Total posts: 209
Posted:I want to go to uni and study art foundation followed by 3 years of jewellery design or silversmithing, or something along those lines.

However the way on which I intend on securing my place is with a portfolio of work. The only problem is I am not entirely sure what they are looking for. I have been doing a lot of observation work, focusing on vertical structures in particular at the moment. I have also started a fashion scrapbook with my own designs in it and I have a small sketchbook for anything that takes my fancy.

What else would you suggest I do?

I'm going to some open days and I intend on talking with the people there to see their input on the subject.

Cheers


anthrax.... it infects, then spreads..... fast

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mech
BRONZE Member since Mar 2017

mech

Carpal \'Tunnel
Location: "In your ear"

Total posts: 6207
Posted:i know im not a student of the arts, but i have some experience in the work place, i have fired and been hired for a few jobs.

what i would say is taht if you are doing a portfolio of work, then you should treat it always like a job interview

i would suggest buying a good arts folder, and filling it with your best stuff, and take that....

im building mine for my photography at the moment, to take to gallerries and art exibits to showcase my work,

but when i have taken past work to jobs to showcase what i can do, i have not take things i either didnt like, or dont think are my best work...

most importantly is to belive 100% in what you are taking, if you have even a little doubt in it, leave it out. or put it later in your book, so that they get a really good impact first, and then dont worry so much later, there is not really a long time to be sent in these interviews,

and more often its about personlity as it is portfolio (this is more aout getting jobs and such)

i would sya strong work, and belive in what you are showing, and maybe domostrate where you would like to goin the future, with some sketches?


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_Aime_
SILVER Member since Jan 2004

_Aime_

Carpal \'Tunnel
Location: Hastings

Total posts: 4172
Posted:Why not go to college?

There will be a much higher chance of you getting into uni with 2-3 years of practice of your specialist subject then just one.

I'm doing a national dimploma in art and design specialising in 3D crafts (metals, woods, plastics, and ceramics). Basically what you'd need to get into a 3D based degree at univerity.



Judging by what you want to do a degree in you're probably a 3D person.

On my course we spent 9 weeks doing rotations of graphics, ceramics, 3D, textiles and fashion. Then at christmas we specialised. I'm in love with the course and I can experimant with lots of different materials, and I'm not quite sure what I want to do at Uni but I'm grateful for the fact that I can have a go at everything.

You may find that after your first 9 weeks you'll want to do something completly different. (A friend started college wanting to specialise in fashion, and came out of her 9 weeks assessmant doing graphics!)



Anyhoo, I'm talking like you're going to move to Eastbourne and enrol in Eastbourne School of Visual and Performing Arts wink



You can also do a foundation year here too. An essential for A-level art studants wanting to go to University to study an art subject.

It works the same way as the national dimploma. Nine weeks of rotations, then you specialise.

Some ND studants choose do to the foundation year as well, to beef up there chances of getting into the Uni they want.

But, as you propose, you can also do the course at most visual arts Universities..

I'd much rather stay at college and get the qualification for free, than go to Uni and pay looots of money for it.



Right - to the point..you're portfolio.

Examples of Art/Graphics/Textiles/Expressive Arts GCSE work (if applicable), Examples of A-level Arty work (again, if applicable). Any other work you've done in your free time you'll feel is appropiate. Any photgraphy as well..

I'm sure you know about dreaded personal statemants..

And - recommendations. A letter from a teacher/employer saying how hard working and lovely you are..

I got mine from my art gcse teacher who thought I shat gold dust. Getting one from my maths teachers would prolly not have such a good idea...



Where was I?



Ah yes - like Mech said, after you've dragged your A1 portfolio on the train and walked half an hour to find the college thats 5 mins away they'll briefly flisk through then ask you what you liek to do at the weekends rolleyes



If you got through all of that, I hope it helped biggrin



hug

EDITED_BY: Aime (1139247061)


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{anthrax}
BRONZE Member since Aug 2004

{anthrax}

Look I've changed my title!
Location: England

Total posts: 209
Posted:Thanks for the help guys, i'll bare all that in mind smile Very useful stuff!

hug


anthrax.... it infects, then spreads..... fast

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pricklyleaf
SILVER Member since Mar 2005

pricklyleaf

with added berries
Location: Manchester

Total posts: 1365
Posted:Make sure you research into which foundation course you do. They are all structured very differently. Where you choose to go affects what structure the course has, its important to apply to a few different ones to find the one thats right for you. Most should have lots of oppertunity for both 3D and 2D, but make sure you check. Bare in mind that only about 1\5th, or even less of art students end up specialising in 3D, so don't worry if the 3D area is smaller than the other areas.



As for your portfolio. For a foundation course your portfolio should demonstrate your enthusiasm for art and design.



You want about 20 A1 or A2 sheets, preferbly all the same size as it makes it easier to look through them. Don't put your sheets in those horrible plastic wallets, it puts a shiny surface on allyour wirk and doesn't make it look good. It also makes your folder weigh a tonne.



Include work in a varity of media. Observation is good of any kind, its good to have a little bit of life drawing in there, as they say if you can draw a figure well, you can draw anything. umm, for foundation you don't need much else, but drawings of some work you made or are going to make wouldn't go amiss.



You also need sketchbooks, that show you can work through a project, ie research, development, conclusion. These are perhaps more important than the sheets. They should also demonstrate some awarness of other artists.



In most cases they will also require you to bring a copy of an art essay, though it's very rare that they actually look at it.



Most colleges will give you a list of what you should bring to the interview when you apply.



As for the interview. Be enthusiastic! That is the best piece of advice I can give.



Use the time they are showing you around to impress. Have questions prepared, ask lots of them. Ask stuff you already know the answer to if you have to, it makes you look like you're interested, as long as you're not asking stuff that makes you look really stupid. Even in the open evening, try to get the attention of potential interviewers. First impressions really count. If you can maintain eye contact with the person who's showing you around, it makes you stand out amongst the other candidates.



Prepare yourself, think of what questions they may ask you, be prepared to talk about:



Why you like art, what areas influence you in particular. (this quite often changes during the course by the way, so don't worry too much.



why you want to do the foundation course (oppurtunity to try a wide varity of things etc, expand horizons blah blah)



why you want to go to that particular college



what hobbies other than art you have - this is an important one - i assume as your on here though that you'll have no problem with that one!



What artists influence you - aviod Dali, Picasso, any other huge names like that, like the plague. Find someone a bit less well known, whos work and ideas you can describe confidently.



Can't really remeber what else they ask, was a couple of years since I was applying for my foundation.



Don't worry about it too much, interviews are always scary, but not many foundation courses are very competitive, and you'll get a place as long as you can show you're enthusaiastic and hard-working.



good luck! Sorry this is so long, I'm ill today, my work isn't going well, so I am distracting myself. Hopefully this will be helpful to you anyway!


Live like there is no tomorrow,
dance like nobody is watching
and hula hoop like wiggling will save the world.

What lies behind us and what lies before us are tiny matters compared to what lies within us.

Ralph Waldo Emerson

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{anthrax}
BRONZE Member since Aug 2004

{anthrax}

Look I've changed my title!
Location: England

Total posts: 209
Posted:You have no idea how grateful I am for all your help biggrin



Hope you get well soon hug


anthrax.... it infects, then spreads..... fast

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pricklyleaf
SILVER Member since Mar 2005

pricklyleaf

with added berries
Location: Manchester

Total posts: 1365
Posted:oooo, knew I forgot something important.

Be prepared to talk through your work. A common question is, which is your most faveorite piece and why. This one caught me out in one of my interviews, but it comes up *a lot*.

They also generally ask you to talk your way through your work.

It doesn't matter which one you pick, it could be your worst piece, but it doesn't matter if you then went on to explain how it was a pivital piece, you learnt a lot from it. Although preferbly choose a good one!


Live like there is no tomorrow,
dance like nobody is watching
and hula hoop like wiggling will save the world.

What lies behind us and what lies before us are tiny matters compared to what lies within us.

Ralph Waldo Emerson

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effex


effex

member


Total posts: 32
Posted:ok answer me these riddles and I may suprise you

how old are you?

why would you want to work with precious metals?

do you want to simply go to university or to learn to work with precious metals?

What would you say are your best advantages to add to this trade?



Precious Metal work is a trade. There are many ways to learn a trade. I will reply when ya answer. or PM me

EDITED_BY: effex (1139350679)


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{anthrax}
BRONZE Member since Aug 2004

{anthrax}

Look I've changed my title!
Location: England

Total posts: 209
Posted:lol ok here be the answers your looking for.

I'm 17 right now but was thinking of uni for when im 18/19

As far as working with precious metals, I think its a skill, a skill that I don't have and I love to learn things. I am fascinated by jewellery in any shape or form but find silver jewellery to be particularly enchanting, I would like to contribute to this trade.

I never planned on going to university until last year when many people were telling me it was the best place to go to learn about the things I wanted to and would help me develop ideas and boost my creativity.

As far as wanting to add to the trade, I feel there are too many shops, especially round where I live, that simply sell jewellery. Not make, but sell. They may do the occasional watch repair, but this isn't anything like what I want to do. I want to create, I want to be expressive, I want to make things that people will wear over and over again whilst receiving enjoyment from something that i have created. I want this.


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effex


effex

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Total posts: 32
Posted:k thats a good reply as I stated before there are many ways to learn this trade. Aprenticeships are now an option in the UK and I think that you can obtain this from some teaching bodies as well as employment by a manufacturing jeweller.

The pro's and cons of how you want to do this is by doing it through a course at a college you will have to pay, where by being employed as an aprentice by a jeweller YOU will get paid. very little but still....

In order to learn a trade you want to learn from a good source. Ensure the experience of any body offering courses, namely the teacher and what qualification they will finally give you. For the trade you need precious metal work, as well as precious stone mounting. Knowing about both precious metals and stones work hand in hand.

There are a few jewellers who offer courses in the basics, if you prove to them your determination they may offer you employment / aprenticeship. This path gives you both experience, payment and retail / trade references which are all very good for your future.

I will post or pm some useful paths and links or people for you. But this is at least a good direction to start thinking.


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{anthrax}
BRONZE Member since Aug 2004

{anthrax}

Look I've changed my title!
Location: England

Total posts: 209
Posted:Thankyou effex, how is that you know about this trade?

What I havn't yet mentioned is that I sent 10 letters off last week to the jewellers in my area, only gaining 2 replies to date. Some peoples ignorance really puts me off wanting to work for them.

However, I am contemplating going a bit further afield where there are better jewellers, just requires more travelling on my part.


anthrax.... it infects, then spreads..... fast

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pricklyleaf
SILVER Member since Mar 2005

pricklyleaf

with added berries
Location: Manchester

Total posts: 1365
Posted:Ok, I'm just going to throw in a few other issues that you may not be aware of.



Apprenticship is a good option. However, I would take into consideration thats its hard to get respect without a degree these days. My uni have just set up a distance learning course for mature students who already work in ceramics to gain a degree, it is now already bigger than the full time course and oversubsribed, a degree opens up more oppertunities away from art as well, if you ever wanted to do something else. The distance learning course would not be so popular, if these proffesional, practicing ceramicists, many of whom are already established, didn't think a degree woukd make a difference to their career prospects.



You don't have to pay any fees for a foundation course (unless thats changed since I did mine), and its only a year, plus your tutors there should be able to take you through all your options and may even have contacts within the industry. Once you've got htat extra years experience you will be in a better position to make the chioce.



I get the impression you're wanting to design, and work on the conceptual side, more than just making. I don't know much about them, but I suspect that, although doing an apprenticeship may give you some oppertunity to design your own, I suspect it'll mainly be just learning the skills of the trade. Going down the university route would mean you get the oppertunity to design your own as well as learning all the skills. I could be wrong though, so I'd research throughly and carefully, you don't want to end up as someone's skivvy.



Yes it does cost more money. But its so worth it in the long term.



I'm not saying not to look into the possibillity of apprentichship, but that you should bear these things in mind when you do. You should talk to people from both side of things to get their opinions, you can always ring up unis and ask to talk to tutors there, saying your interested in applying, most will be happy to talk to you. Also find jewellers that do apprentichships and ask for their views. Try and get contacts for the students of both.



And remember, all this is just different peoples opinions, it's important to find whats best for you. And make sure you consider the long term as well as the short term.


Live like there is no tomorrow,
dance like nobody is watching
and hula hoop like wiggling will save the world.

What lies behind us and what lies before us are tiny matters compared to what lies within us.

Ralph Waldo Emerson

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PyroWill
GOLD Member since Aug 2004

PyroWill

HoP's Barman. Trapped aged 6 months
Location: Staines

Total posts: 4437
Posted:Im not much of an artist so not really best to help you with this but rory (on HoP as thebovrilmonkey) has recently been getting into metalwork and silversmith stuff, might be worth PMing him

An eye for an eye only ends up making the whole world blind

Give a man a fish and he'll eat 4 a day hit a man with a brick and you can have all his fish and his wife

"Will's to pretty for prison" - Simian

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effex


effex

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Total posts: 32
Posted:ok the NEW apprentice system in uk is defined. learn more about it here: http://www.apprenticeships.org.uk/list/a...lliedtrades.htm
br>
Jewellery design is a study based on not only production of a piece but designing it. In order to do this you would need to have good skills in drawing and art as a whole as this is incorperated. Jewellery design is a complex but not perfect manner to learn about jewellery manufacture. the same applies to silver smithing, although it is probably easier to study silver-smithing in college / uni than getting into the few companies.

Designing a piece is a practical aplication. Learning the technical theories is all very well, but we can sit here talking about jumping into a swimming-pool and draw a thousand diagrams of how to do it. The best way to figure it out is by doing it. And experience matters.

I have come accross loadsa 'desingers' who are able to create a piece, but are used to the 'college' deadlines, meaning it takes them 3 x the time to make something compared to a person experienced in the raw trade.
yes being an apprentice means being a scivvy - general dogs body but hell you are getting paid to learn a trade, the consesus for some countries aprenticeship is 3 - 5 years. If you want to go and spend all your money on fancy college courses and then to finally end up being exactly the same is up to you. its your money.
The way trades work is not by paper. You can take all the drawings and degrees to a perspective employer and the only thing thats gonna get you anywhere is how well you work. Not only speed but precision too. Saying that there are many 'further studies' open to the trade, including engraving. horology, stone mounting and stone-grading (gemology). As I said some experienced people who have studied and then opened thier own studios offer courses and they can tell you the practical truth about it.
Unless you have the ability and resources to study and then spend thousands on tools you will want to get employed in the trade. Even doing a part time sales position in a silver or gold smithery will teach you alot. In order to sell your designs/ pieces you will finally need that retail experience.


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NOn


activist for HoPper liberation.
Location: ffidrac

Total posts: 1643
Posted:i think pretty much everything on the portfolio front has been covered already, but some personal experience....

i applied direct to a 3D course without art foundation but a strong Design Technology A-level, and I only did this because i knew i wanted to study 3D... but that meant i didn't have so many completed projects to show, didn't really matter, because i could explain what i had done and why, and showed interest in the subject area. Art foundation is a little broader, so get a good range of work in your portfolio, sketchbooks are good, but don't take them all, just the best one, they just want to see how you work. (I never worked in sketchbooks, before uni...!) Don't take too much, show your process but not you're whole project, it's best to have a few things you can talk about in depth than too much.... i had to do this, because i didn't have loads of projects... If you can present everything in the same format, do it, i did A2, think A1 is too big and you end up with too much on it, don't take models, get good photographs, they can see your making skills from these, and also your presentation skills. Can't really say anymore, as it has already been said, but this is what i did, and it got me 6 unconditional offers, so must've been ok...

I think the art foundation is definately a good option if you're going on to a degree, as it gives you a good grounding in the way to work... a 3D degree is going to encourage a very creative approach, you will probably be taught basic making techniques, but then everything else is up to, you can run your projects from a material research angle or a theoretical one, as long as examiners can see what your process was, this is what will get you your degree. An apprenticeship will obviously give you a great start in the craftmanship of jewellery, which is equally important, if you ask me, i think it's good to do both, the creative and the crafts angle... am looking to improve my craft skills myself, now that i've finished the degree part... and i've met people who have done the reverse, an apprenticeship and work experience, but are now looking towards doing a theory based qualification. it makes it sound like a long time until you work, doing both, but even if it's a part time or weekend course in design theory, it can help, if you go the apprenticeship route...

if you go the degree route... well arts degrees are very full on timewise, they are what you make of them and if you can find a craftsman local to your chosen uni who will take you as an apprentice for a couple of days a week or something, then that could be worthwhile....? As effex just said about the retail position, there a number of jewellers who also run a workshop in their shops, that kind of place could be good part time work experience...

uh.... so yeh... that was a bit rambly and maybe not so helpful, but anyway good luck with the interviews and such smile


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if it makes no sense that's because it's NOn-sense.

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effex


effex

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Total posts: 32
Posted:Non just pointed out how complex designing something is, before the primary construction. I myself have done it the other way around. Which for me gave me the knowledge in knowing what designs would work best and be more practical.
You can earn a good living using cgi (graphic) design as well as artistic impressions (renderings) for many / most businesses - take the motor industry for ex. As far as the jewellery trade goes there is very little call for such employment except for the large more dynamic businesses. Yes it would be an advantage for you to have. but spending several years on it just for jewellery well; I have my discriminations.

It is a tricky thing to advise, I have been a tradesman for 13 - 14 years now. The best thing I can recc is get the best most effecient tutoring and some tools, when ya not studying / working; practise at home. I started off as an apprentice earning less than a minimum wage, struggled through it all the hard way. I can only try offer suggestions in not falling foul of the many mistakes I made. I could probably teach someone in 5 years what took me almost 15 to learn.


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{anthrax}
BRONZE Member since Aug 2004

{anthrax}

Look I've changed my title!
Location: England

Total posts: 209
Posted:Once again I thank you all for your input hug

I have spent the past few days going round and speaking to jewellers and whatnot. I visited a place in Sleaford called the Hub, they sell some really nice peices there. Anyway, I couldn't get myself a job there, but the woman suggested I take courses in jewellery design if I couldn't find an apprenticeship in the area. She also thought it might be worthwhile getting a different job and doing night courses on jewellery design and trying it out as a secondary proffession.

This got me thinking about getting an apprenticeship as an electrician. Its something I can fall back on if in the future I find jewellery isn't getting me very far, but I can also sell jewellery on the side, in other shops, from what I have learnt from courses.

What do you think about this route? It avoids the debts caused by uni, gives me a source of income and if need be, gives me a proffession to come back to.


anthrax.... it infects, then spreads..... fast

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pricklyleaf
SILVER Member since Mar 2005

pricklyleaf

with added berries
Location: Manchester

Total posts: 1365
Posted:Don't worry about the money thing too much, you get student loans and can get bursarys and other funding. You can also get a part time job if you have to. Yes me and my friends will be in debt when we leave, but will be able to pay it back. I haven't known anyone to drop out of course because of lack of money, if your really broke you can always get hardship funding, that you don't have to pay back. If your family fall into a low income bracket, then you don't have to pay tuition fees either. This is coming from someone with first hand experience of it, not from the information you get in the press.

I say you only live once, go for it. If it all goes wrong then you can do the electricions apprenticeship after that. But its harder to go back and study as a mature student. From your other posts I can see your passionate about jewelry design. It would be a real shame to deprive yourself of the chance to do this properly. You're likley to regret it in the future.

It's very hard to get the motivation to do art on the side. It's very unlikley anyone could maintain doing a full time job, and lots of work on the jewellry, you could probably manage a bit, but not much. Even if you did take a night class, it would be unlikly that it went past hobby level, and would not be enough to set you up well for a career in jewellry. If I was you I would ask yourself:

Do I want to be an electrician?

I think the answer is no - I want to be a jeweller.

And like I say, you don't have to pay for a foundation course, and its only one year. It would put you in a better position to make this decision. I would suggest you talk to your art teachers as well.


Live like there is no tomorrow,
dance like nobody is watching
and hula hoop like wiggling will save the world.

What lies behind us and what lies before us are tiny matters compared to what lies within us.

Ralph Waldo Emerson

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effex


effex

member


Total posts: 32
Posted:i was looking here at a basic jewellery course:
http://www.bcuc.ac.uk/main.asp?page=264
br>As ya can see all the advice Aimee , Pricklyleaf and NOn an everyone else gave would deff help you in this direction.

I have sent you (anthrax) a pm

You seem more interested in jewellery, mostly manufacturing it. So if this is your definate goal be prepared to show determination. I did my aprenticeship before minimum wages and had to get a second job and I see alot of myself years ago in your situation. I would never of been able to do a trade had I not a friend doing it who took me under his wing. I was very lucky. I couldnt afford to study or anything. Since then the only thing that got me to today is determination. I am now prepared that in the very near future to start my own business. It is the whole reason I did it and the only reason i stuck to my trade.

Working for someone is going to give you the fastest practical experience. Generally a good employer will send you on courses to better your skills and thus better his business.
Be sure who you work for initially you may be prepared to do anything to get your foot in the door. But some people will use that against you. Sadly all businesses have it's sharks. Look at the facilities, the skills of the staff, even ask around other shops about them. Ask at any interview if they are prepared to send you on a basic skills courses. Fair enough if they good enough they will be able to teach you this pretty much on the premises, but the certificates do help. truthfully at the end of the day its the experience that counts most. Most of the courses are only a few days and only introduces one to the basics. Stone grading courses are the ones that help most. Jewellers (whom sell only) def go for this as it adds to thier cv. A goldsmiths cv is in his / her hands / skill everything else comes with the territory.
Ask a prospective employer or find out how long his staff has been there as this is a def sign of the happiness of employess in his/ her employment. Most importantly the experience of whom will be teaching you, try not get taught by someone who has very few years experience. Preferbaly you want 2 or more experienced goldsmiths / silversmiths around.

Do 2nd studies if you can, a few colleges / places give summer courses, maybe an option this year. This can help, it is afterall experience. Even a very small introductory course will help now if ya have 100 spare.

I am open to try aid you further, should you wish as best I can in your venture. But you must be prepared to perhaps leave your county to get the best experience.


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{anthrax}
BRONZE Member since Aug 2004

{anthrax}

Look I've changed my title!
Location: England

Total posts: 209
Posted:In my local area, there is nothing for me. I am more than prepared to move elsewhere if thats what I need to do to learn what I want. However I now have absolutely no money whatsoever mainly because of car insurance. In order to get a job out of my county I wolud need to rent accomodation with money I don't have.

I had started my portfolio work whilst I had a job and found that I still had adequate time to get quite a lot done during the evenings.

If I can't become a jewellers apprentice right away, I might take the electricians apprenticeship, or indeed any job, just to earn enough money to move away. Either way I would still continue with my portfolio work.


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effex


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Posted:There are two ways of doing an apprenticeship: A formal one and simply by just being employed. I am unsure of the Uk conditions of a formal apprenticeship, in mine if I was unhappy where I was doing it i could transfer it to another company.



You could use my previous post pretty much as a guide for any trade.



Doing an electrician 'job' would to be honest probably easier and pay more initially. And you would probably be in a situation to go self employed within 2-3 years. very much unlike jewellery.

The trade I am in is constantly pushing me to learn new things and I am always trying new ways of doing things so one would only be able to go self employed with good experience in about 5 - 10 years. It all depends on yourself and how much you push yourself to learn things. That is why I recc. getting a part time course in the interim. Some jewellery makers become ''jobbers' which mean once they know how to do the basics they are able to rent a little space in an existing workshop and offer services to the local jewellers. (ring sizings etc)



In your situation I recon maybe working and trying yr best to save a bit for a evening course would really help you alot cause it wouldnt be as expensive nor time consuming as a full 3 year course and ya get really good contacts etc. Evening courses arent that expensive. Grab a few prospectus 's from yr closest colleges etc, there must be one in driving distance that offers a evening metal work course, ifnot ask around, maybe even the local colleges know where. Btw I got my present job for my trade by applying for a job that wasnt my trade in a company that dealt with that area of business, but I thought hey at least I would be dealing with what I knew. As it landed up I got to do what I wanted anyhow.



About differing trades, ie: electrician vs jewellery making. There is a thing called a niche market. You already stated that yr local jewellers dont do manufacturing or repairs so you know already that there is a demand in your area for this type of service. Which is good. If ya pick up a local yellow pages and look up electricians you will notice loads of them. This is a simple market reasearch that tells you who your competition is, and how many of them there are. Something to ponder.



If ya have a goal or dream dont let go of it.

EDITED_BY: effex (1139603673)


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mech
BRONZE Member since Mar 2017

mech

Carpal \'Tunnel
Location: "In your ear"

Total posts: 6207
Posted:i just started to print out my portfolio, looking good, i hope :S

Step (el-nombrie)

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{anthrax}
BRONZE Member since Aug 2004

{anthrax}

Look I've changed my title!
Location: England

Total posts: 209
Posted:Nice one mech.... your gonna have to show me some of it biggrin your stuff really excites me smile

I visited Connexions today, which is sort of like a careers advice place for young people. I told them what I wanted to do and they said it was fairly obvious that because I kept coming back to the subject of being a jeweller, then thats what I really wanted to do. I have an interview next week with someone who knows what all my options are.

I also just had a quick run round town finding retail jobs in Clintons Cards and Clarks Shoes, got some application forms to fill in.

I am aware of evening classes that are being organised for the summer and winter, so I will definately be taking myself along to those.

I will be able to think about what I want to do once I get a small job and am safe in the knowledge that for the time being I am financially secure. I don't care if I only work as a salesperson for a week, the money would be greatly appreciated, giving me time to relax and finally get my head around exactly what it is im going to do smile


anthrax.... it infects, then spreads..... fast

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mech
BRONZE Member since Mar 2017

mech

Carpal \'Tunnel
Location: "In your ear"

Total posts: 6207
Posted:Written by: {anthrax}

Nice one mech.... your gonna have to show me some of it biggrin your stuff really excites me smile



my work gets you excited :S

maybe thats not such a good thing! wink

im making a portfolio pdf with in the next week, for people to download and view, so you should be able to see it then....

just need to figure out how to use InDesign :S


Step (el-nombrie)

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{anthrax}
BRONZE Member since Aug 2004

{anthrax}

Look I've changed my title!
Location: England

Total posts: 209
Posted:Oh wow! My girlfriends mum was talking to a jeweller in Newark who shes known for a year. She says that she is going to start taking on apprentices, wants me to give her a call and arrange a time and date for her to see me and my c.v. biggrin

Shes 40 years old, designs and makes her own jewellery, owns a shop and apparently is a lovely woman! I really, really want this sooooooooo badly!

Sounds like the perfect opportunity to me smile


anthrax.... it infects, then spreads..... fast

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pricklyleaf
SILVER Member since Mar 2005

pricklyleaf

with added berries
Location: Manchester

Total posts: 1365
Posted:That sounds great! good luck biggrin

Live like there is no tomorrow,
dance like nobody is watching
and hula hoop like wiggling will save the world.

What lies behind us and what lies before us are tiny matters compared to what lies within us.

Ralph Waldo Emerson

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NOn


activist for HoPper liberation.
Location: ffidrac

Total posts: 1643
Posted:hey, good networking anthrax wink sounds like a great opportunity, you should definately go for it!! biggrin

Mech> you don't have to use InDesign to create a PDF portfolio, if you have photoshop CS, you can save it as PDF and automate to a presentation or multipage document.... but while we're on the subject of portfolios and stuff, i've noticed that lately a lot of design employers are asking for InDesign experience, and i've never used the programme myself, am i right in thinking it's a layout/DTP kind of programme for print?


Aurinko freedom agreement reached 10th Sept 2006

if it makes no sense that's because it's NOn-sense.

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TheBovrilMonkey
SILVER Member since Sep 2001

TheBovrilMonkey

Liquid Cow
Location: High Wycombe, England

Total posts: 2629
Posted:Written by: {anthrax}


I visited Connexions today, which is sort of like a careers advice place for young people. I told them what I wanted to do and they said it was fairly obvious that because I kept coming back to the subject of being a jeweller, then thats what I really wanted to do. I have an interview next week with someone who knows what all my options are.







Sounds like you spoke with an advisor who knew what they were doing.

When I went, they had me take an aptitute test and said that the results showed that I could in theory do anything I wanted.

All good so far, but then they kept telling me I should be an accountant, regardless of how many times I told them I don't want to be an accountant and I want a job where I make things with my hands, preferably jewellery.



I've just looked up their site again, and bizarrely, it says that they're only there for 16-19 year olds. They must have changed that since I saw them, because I'm 26 confused



Good luck with the apprenticeship in Newark smile


But there's no sense crying over every mistake. You just keep on trying till you run out of cake.

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effex


effex

member


Total posts: 32
Posted:sounds good. good luck. make sure ya ask about the things i mentioned. If all goes well and you get the job, you will probably need to buy a few basic tools. check with her.

go to a market and ya can pick em up real cheap, not best quality but just to get started. But check with her. most gold smiths have a set of personal tools such as files, hammers, pliers, size-sticks etc. Some of the tools are specialised though but she can order them for you. In some cases you wont be needing them at first any how, she would probably supply them for you at her own expense. Be sure to ask these things. Nothing I have posted here is for my benefit, use it, and ask me if ya need any info etc.

EDITED_BY: effex (1139749544)


smile and people will wonder what yr up to.

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{anthrax}
BRONZE Member since Aug 2004

{anthrax}

Look I've changed my title!
Location: England

Total posts: 209
Posted:All your help has been really fantastic, I couldn't have asked for anything else biggrin hug

I have her number and am going to call her tomorrow to see about an interview. Apparently they havn't set the workshop up yet, so I'm hoping I might be able to help them with that. That way, when it comes to the actualy apprenticeship, I will have an advantage over everyone else because the owners will already know me smile

Really happy about this ubbrollsmile

Fingers crossed, it will all work out biggrin

Once again I thank all of you for what you have said hug


anthrax.... it infects, then spreads..... fast

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Daiz
BRONZE Member since Feb 2006

Daiz

Radioactive Member
Location: Calgary, Alberta

Total posts: 106
Posted:Well, I guess it really depends. What exactly are you looking for in terms of job occupation, and what would you want your Long-Time career to be?

I'm gonna cut you up so bad, you gonna wish I ain't cut you up so bad.

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Page: 12

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