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Kyrian 4,308 posts
Location: York, England


Posted:
Well, I'm still recuperating a bit from my trip, but it was loads of fun! But this isn't really about that, so much as my amusement at occasional inabilities of americans and brits to communicate.

Hardest word for me to change back now that I'm here: Trainers
Hardest word for me to change to when i was there: Trousers
Most fun word: Fancy
Hardest word for me to understand in conversation: Bins
Hardest phrase: Have a go


And no, I don't know why i tripped over have a(nother) go so often. I realize it makes perfect logical sense.

So what do people like better/worse about british/american english?

And does anyone have any good communication stories?

I think my favourite was when i asked drew "Can all pants be called trousers?"

-Kbug

PS I promise to be a lot less shy next time!

Keep your dream alive
Dreamin is still how the strong survive

Shalom VeAhavah

New Hampshire has a point....


Sporky 663 posts
Location: Glasgow


Posted:
Esparanto... what a joke. I did it as part of a course at uni and spent half of the time laughing at it.

Have faith in what you can do and respect for what you can't


VampyricAcidSILVER Member
1,286 posts
Location: My House, United Kingdom


Posted:
lol i know star, i just wanted to see the americans struggle with it, i also read a story recently where an american woman asked what a Megane was, to which her husband replied, i think its french for Renault

Proudly Owned By The BMVC

Are You Sniffing My Mitten?


SeyeSILVER Member
Geek
1,261 posts
Location: Manchester, UK


Posted:
Written by: Kyrian



In america sub can mean sandwhich (grinder, hoagie, whatever). and it can also mean sub-woofer. Do both of those translate?




No.

A sub is a thing that makes deep bass.



The closest we have here is Subway - the massive chain who make crap, expensive sandwiches. Thats an american thing anyway.



Sandwich is the generic word but normally refers to soemthing which is made with slices of bread. All other kinds of sandwich are referred to by the kind of bread used i.e. baguette, roll, etc.



The worst place for roundabouts in the WORLD is Swindon. There's even roundabouts surrounded by roundabouts where the middle one goes the wrong way!



On a similar note - Speed Camera's (or enforcement cameras) are still quite an alien concept in the US. Northampton (where i'm currently living) has the highest concentration of speed camera's anywhere in the world. So many in fact that when they installed the first one in LA a friend of mine who lives there emailed me to say she'd just seen northampton on her local news as an example. Most people in the UK have never heard of this town!



And the word Chav comes from the name of their spiritual home; Chatham. Its a great word. If you want a good description go to www.chavscum.co.uk - or take a good hard look at Mike Skinner, or just go to Southend-on-Sea.



This is my personal fave from chavscum...

(**contains swearing**)

https://www.chavscum.co.uk/catalog/images/chavspotting_large.jpg

Kyrian 4,308 posts
Location: York, England


Posted:
So its the second kind but not the first. right then.

so if i want a sandwhich on a baguette i ask for a baguette? how do they know i don't want the bread?

Keep your dream alive
Dreamin is still how the strong survive

Shalom VeAhavah

New Hampshire has a point....


SeyeSILVER Member
Geek
1,261 posts
Location: Manchester, UK


Posted:
Written by: Kyrian


So its the second kind but not the first. right then.

so if i want a sandwhich on a baguette i ask for a baguette? how do they know i don't want the bread?



confused
You normally ask for a **insert filling here** baguette from a sandwich shop or just buy a baguette from a baker / supermarket.

Kyrian 4,308 posts
Location: York, England


Posted:
oh right, sandwhiches are kind of weird over there. but good.

Keep your dream alive
Dreamin is still how the strong survive

Shalom VeAhavah

New Hampshire has a point....


SeyeSILVER Member
Geek
1,261 posts
Location: Manchester, UK


Posted:
Generally our sandwiches are of the **under 3 feet long** variety.

I know that may seem unusual to those of you in the US...

wink

Kyrian 4,308 posts
Location: York, England


Posted:
now now, most sandwhiches are 6" or 12", in general, if they are subs/grinders- but we don't do that "pick something out of a bowl and spoon it on" thing so much... lots of options in a sandwhich shop.....

Keep your dream alive
Dreamin is still how the strong survive

Shalom VeAhavah

New Hampshire has a point....


Sporky 663 posts
Location: Glasgow


Posted:
No wonder obesity is on the rise in the US.

To those of us in the UK a sandwich is one of those things invented by Lord Sandwich in the 1800s.

Have faith in what you can do and respect for what you can't


Kyrian 4,308 posts
Location: York, England


Posted:
Two phrases which don't seem to be translating to british.... tongue

"I'm dating myself"

and

"Suck it up"

Keep your dream alive
Dreamin is still how the strong survive

Shalom VeAhavah

New Hampshire has a point....


NYCNYC
9,232 posts
Location: NYC, NY, USA


Posted:
As always, this topic has been discussed before. Many times.



Here are two examples from:

[Old link]

and

[Old link]



But I did faux pas by calling Molly's Mother's Cooking 'Really Quite Good' ... which would be a compliment in the US and is not so much so in the UK.



Yup, I'm slowly becoming bilingual in American and British. biggrin

Well, shall we go?
Yes, let's go.
[They do not move.]


Kyrian 4,308 posts
Location: York, England


Posted:
Ah, yeah, I was doing stuff like that in England... heh... and i know its been discussed, but I felt like a new thread.

Keep your dream alive
Dreamin is still how the strong survive

Shalom VeAhavah

New Hampshire has a point....


ArythSILVER Member
134 posts
Location: Liverpool, England


Posted:
Two quick things in England we speak English the rest speak a bastardised version haha wink although olde english is a much better language when all the letters were pronounced, its real hard to learn though one of my friends tried for her linguistics course.

Secondly Skelmersdale is the worst place for roundabouts its basically a massive council estate (town) built about 15 miles from liverpool which was used when Liverpool run out of houses for people, in the 50's or something. The whole place is built around roundabouts and is proudly the home of the worlds largest roundabout of 3/4 of a mile, i once missed my turning off it twice and man i was dizzy afterwards!!

Whatever happened to my green and pleasant land?


Kyrian 4,308 posts
Location: York, England


Posted:
On another note, what do british people call handdrummers? So far I understand a drummer plays set (in american) which is just "the drums" in british as near as I can figure out, and otherwise you're a percussionist. So, erm, handdrummers arn't really quite either of those things, and it seems like there should be a way to seperate them from those who play on a drum set/kit so... what is it?

Keep your dream alive
Dreamin is still how the strong survive

Shalom VeAhavah

New Hampshire has a point....


ArythSILVER Member
134 posts
Location: Liverpool, England


Posted:
ok so what we have here is someone who plays a drum kit/set whatever. by hand drums i'm presuming you mean bongo's, or congo drums, not sure of the spelling but bodhrams etc... we tend to just call them by their actual name as opposed to hand drumming in general terms.

Whatever happened to my green and pleasant land?


MynciBRONZE Member
Macaque of all trades
8,738 posts
Location: wombling free..., United Kingdom


Posted:
myself and a few friends once tried teaching an american cockney rhyming slang....I don't believe i have ever laughed so hard my entire life.
they thought we were making it all up.
ubblol

A couple of balls short of a full cascade... or maybe a few cards short of a deck... we'll see how this all fans out.


=Flashpoint=SILVER Member
Pasta of Muppets
2,722 posts
Location: in the interwebs..., United Kingdom


Posted:
You've all probably seen this

ohmygodlaserbeamspewpewpew!
ubbrollsmileubbrollsmileubbrollsmileubbrollsmile


AkashlaBRONZE Member
72 posts
Location: On the far left of sane, Ireland


Posted:
Just as an aside

The European Commission has just announced an agreement whereby English will be the official language of the European Union rather than German, which was the other contender.

As part of the negotiations, the British Government conceded that English spelling had some room for improvement and has accepted a 5- year phase-in plan that would become known as "Euro-English".

In the first year, "s" will replace the soft "c". Sertainly, this will make the sivil servants jump with joy.

The hard "c" will be dropped in favour of "k". This should klear up konfusion, and keyboards kan have one less letter.

There will be growing publik enthusiasm in the sekond year when the troublesome "ph" will be replaced with "f". This will make words like fotograf 20% shorter.

In the 3rd year, publik akseptanse of the new spelling kan be expekted to reach the stage where more komplikated changes are possible.

Governments will enkourage the removal of double letters which have always ben a deterent to akurate speling.

Also, al wil agre that the horibl mes of the silent "e" in the languag is disgrasful and it should go away.

By the 4th yer people wil be reseptiv to steps such as replasing "th" with "z" and "w" with "v".

During ze fifz yer, ze unesesary "o" kan be dropd from vords kontaining "ou" and after ziz fifz yer, ve vil hav a reil sensibl riten styl.

Zer vil be no mor trubl or difikultis and evrivun vil find it ezi tu understand ech oza.
Ze drem of a united urop vil finali kum tru.
After zat, ze vorld!

I am not a bitch.
I am THE bitch.
And Im Miss Bitch to you.


Lemonkey 1,019 posts
Location: Huddersfield + Hull Uni... UK.


Posted:
Written by: Akashla


Just as an aside

The European Commission has just announced an agreement whereby English will be the official language of the European Union rather than German, which was the other contender.

As part of the negotiations, the British Government conceded that English spelling had some room for improvement and has accepted a 5- year phase-in plan that would become known as "Euro-English".

In the first year, "s" will replace the soft "c". Sertainly, this will make the sivil servants jump with joy.

The hard "c" will be dropped in favour of "k". This should klear up konfusion, and keyboards kan have one less letter.

There will be growing publik enthusiasm in the sekond year when the troublesome "ph" will be replaced with "f". This will make words like fotograf 20% shorter.

In the 3rd year, publik akseptanse of the new spelling kan be expekted to reach the stage where more komplikated changes are possible.

Governments will enkourage the removal of double letters which have always ben a deterent to akurate speling.

Also, al wil agre that the horibl mes of the silent "e" in the languag is disgrasful and it should go away.

By the 4th yer people wil be reseptiv to steps such as replasing "th" with "z" and "w" with "v".

During ze fifz yer, ze unesesary "o" kan be dropd from vords kontaining "ou" and after ziz fifz yer, ve vil hav a reil sensibl riten styl.

Zer vil be no mor trubl or difikultis and evrivun vil find it ezi tu understand ech oza.
Ze drem of a united urop vil finali kum tru.
After zat, ze vorld!




ubblol

German, argh!

Willy - is bad for your health...


BirgitBRONZE Member
had her carpal tunnel surgery already thanks v much
4,145 posts
Location: Edinburgh, Scotland (UK)


Posted:
Careful, may be offensive to some people... but it IS funny!

https://home.arcor.de/bikaga/hop/nations.doc

10 reasons why it's fun to be of quite a few different nationalities smile

"vices are like genitals - most are ugly to behold, and yet we find that our own are dear to us."
(G.W. Dahlquist)

Owner of Dragosani's left half


Kyrian 4,308 posts
Location: York, England


Posted:
Lol birgit. I've been reading those to people most of the evening. Scottish is way the best. biggrin

So, I finally decided to look up what minger meant.... does anyone have a friggin clue where that word came from? confused

Keep your dream alive
Dreamin is still how the strong survive

Shalom VeAhavah

New Hampshire has a point....


lastrenshai 31 posts

Posted:
chav surprisingly has it's roots in the gypsie/romanian/old romantic language word for young person..

chaav

so it was adopted from proper gypsie travellers who called their young it and hence became an insult.. like pikey and townie etc...!

newgabeSILVER Member
what goes around comes around. unless you're into stalls.
4,030 posts
Location: Bali, Australia


Posted:
Written by: =Flashpoint=


You've all probably seen this




nice one Flashpoint! Good to have a chuckle before bed.... ubblol

.....Can't juggle balls but I sure as hell can juggle details....


Sporky 663 posts
Location: Glasgow


Posted:
The declaration of revocation: If only it were true. That'd teach the yanks a thing or two.

American tourist "Do you know what bus goes to Edinberg?"

At least bother to learn a bit of the British language before you come over. When I went to Alabama I bothered learning inbred so why can't you bother learning some of our language? tongue

Have faith in what you can do and respect for what you can't


IgirisujinSILVER Member
2,666 posts
Location: Preston, United Kingdom


Posted:
Written by: Kyrian


tarmac -> asphalt

you eat biscuits with gravy. and don't forget all the muffin and cracker strangeness.
and roads are really just roads. we have roundabouts, we just havn't igured out how to drive on them it seems. and we have too many stop signs but we still get places faster in cars. which reminds me:

bonnet -> hood
?? -> windsheild
petrol -> gas
large car -> small car
car -> stick/ manual (as i'm led to belive there are no automatics in britain)
boot -> trunk




lol there are plenty of automatics in britain my dad used to have a 15 year old volvo that was an automatic, its just all the ones here actualy have a geer lever despite being an auto just incase the automaticness brakes, it means you can still continue to use the car afterwards without having to send it to a garage, we have common sense that way you see lol

Oh and...

(English) - (American)
Wind screen - Wind Sheild

Just incase no one thought to fill you in on that, I havnt been following the thread mutch so forgive me if its allready been mentiond.

Chief adviser to the Pharaoh, in one very snazzy mutli-coloured coat

'Time goes by so slowly for those who wait...' - Whatever Happend To Baby Madonna?


FireTomStargazer
6,650 posts

Posted:
@BJ wasn't it: "windshield"? wink



@Lemonkey: LOLOLOL nice ones! exactly what happens in german spelling revision ---> ridiculous! ubbloco



but ins't it already ONE nation seperated by a common language? does anyone from the north really understand people from the south? I had/have a VERY hard time to!



(please 4give if it's been asked b4)
EDITED_BY: FireTom (1135726505)

the best smiles are the ones you lead to wink


Rouge DragonBRONZE Member
Insert Champagne Here
13,215 posts
Location: without class distinction, Australia


Posted:
I haven't read this entire thread for obvious reasons (meaning it's LONG!) but I did have fun overseas with the word: "thongs"

the aussies will know what I'm talking about but the rest of you might look at me quite strangely indeed! (I know Pink, Cantus, Mech and Konsti did! ubblol)

i would have changed ***** to phallus, and claire to petey Petey

Rougie: but that's what I'm doing here
Arnwyn: what letting me adjust myself in your room?..don't you dare quote that on HoP...


PeleBRONZE Member
the henna lady
6,193 posts
Location: WNY, USA


Posted:
Actually, the Kiwi's and Aussie I spent time with knew the difference between them immediately...and so did I. They sound very different to me.

But in the end, I don't speak English. I speak American, with all the "melting pot" linguistic nuances it comes with.
And even then, depending on where you live in the US really dictates how you speak/sound. Within the US there are many different languages and dialects, just like any other country.
Not just north and south, but east, middle and west as well.
I understand alot of Brit-isms because my New England based grandmother used them. I also understand Cajun from family relations but get a bit confuzzled as to what the hell some of those Mid-westerners are talking about.

And even in Canada there are variations. Yes, Toronto does have a dialect, and they say "aboot" and "aye" frequently. Vancouver didn't say "aye" though, they said "hay" instead. Freaked me out.

I had the fanny conversation with Malcolm, and it left me laughing and nearly in tears. I think that is one of the biggest things, and the mushy words (I agree with sex, six, sux for example).

I love it all though. Language is sooooooo fantastic! And as long as you get the gist of what I am saying, I am cool with that.:)

Pele
Higher, higher burning fire...making music like a choir
"Oooh look! A pub!" -exclaimed after recovering from a stupid fall
"And for the decadence of art, nothing beats a roaring fire." -TMK


BlayzeSILVER Member
187 posts
Location: CANADA


Posted:
Okay, let's clear something up...they are not trainers or sneakers...they are called RUNNERS! tongue
And I don't understand this 'aboot' thing. I say 'about' - rhymes with out, not oot.
And Americans....that thing on top of your house is a rOOf, not a rUf...just so you know... spank
biggrin

I smile because I have no idea what is going on...


MikeGinnyGOLD Member
HOP Mad Doctor
13,922 posts
Location: San Francisco, CA, USA


Posted:
The thing about the Canadian accent is that it goes like this.

"imperceptible imperceptible imperceptib...OBVIOUSOBVIOUSOBVIOUS...imperceptible imperceptible...OBVIOUSOBVIOUS...imperceptible imperceptible..."

ubblol

-Mike

Certified Mad Doctor and HoP High Priest of Nutella



A buckuht n a hooze! -Valura


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