Forums > Social Chat > End point of Twirling.

Login/Join to Participate

Posted:Hey All,something I have been wondering about for a while, but reading Pele's recent post has led me to ask...Is fire performance (ie fire theatre - audience interaction etc) the logical end point of developing yourself as a fire twirler?It seems to me, that about 99% of the best fire twirlers I know of, are involved in semi / professional fire performance. I like performing to a crowd as much as the next twirler, but I certainly dont feel that 'performance' is where I'm particularly heading...My really favourite thing is twirling with other twirlers...with or without an audience..your thoughts?Josh

Delete Topic

Endangered Sanity
member
Location: Brisbane, QLD, Australia
Member Since: 11th Feb 2001
Total posts: 164
Posted:I think that the end point of developing yourself as a fire twirler is different depending on what you see as the 'end'. Personally, I don't think there is an 'end point' of developing yourself. For me, there isn't a point where I will think of myself as a fully developed fire twirler. There will always be something else you can learn, or another way of doing things. But if I was asked where I was heading, I think I would say "everywhere". And I think mainly the reason people do want to perform is that they are trying to achieve every person's dream: to do something you enjoy, and actually get paid for it.

Delete

Posted:Most of the twirling i've done and seen over the years is at outdoor dance parties in nz, where tons and tons of people do fire, hardly anyone is semi/professional, but many are very very good. I was surprised on this board to find this is not the case in other places. Or perhaps just not the people on the board?For me, performance can be fun, but playing around with friends is better.

Delete

Skye
member
Location: Boise, ID, USA
Member Since: 15th Mar 2001
Total posts: 33
Posted:I've been working with the stick really seriously for about eight years and I went though a period about four years ago when I was really into the fire aspect of it. These days I only light up on special occasions or when I'm playing a show with me band.But after all this time I do still play with an unlit firestick or plain old rattan stick an hour or two every day. To me, it's all about the kinetics and chi and meditative aspects now.I think the end point is different for everyone. There seem to be a lot of people here who are into this more from a circus angle and others who are into it more for martial or meditative reasons.I think I need to do this for the rest of my life before it reaches a conclusion I think.Skye

Delete

Superman
Superman

member
Location: Houston, Texas
Member Since: 13th Mar 2001
Total posts: 829
Posted:I think it is different for everyone..And it changes with experience. My end was to progress to fire. But now i think i want to compete after that. I dont know about performing because i havent even reached my first goal yet.I see what you are saying though..is there another level to take it too after performance?------------------"Only the warrior that hears the call will know when to leave, Where to go" -unknown

Courage is resistance to fear, mastery of fear--not absence of fear.


- Mark Twain

Delete

Pele
Pele

the henna lady
Location: WNY, USA
Member Since: 15th Dec 2000
Total posts: 6193
Posted:Nice question/thought Josh.Performing wasn't ever an end point for me in any of my performance aspects, it's an extention of myself and my expression the same way poi are. For me there will never be an end point, I keep learning new things, developing new toys and growing as a person and a spinner. I concider myself an eternal student. I am fortunate enough to be able to incorporate all these extensions of me in one combined package. I think that for those who believe performing is an end point will find they tire of it for this reason...the best performers I know with the greatest longevity do what they do because they love it so very much, with or without an audience, and they continue to evolve for themselves alone.As for the semi/professional differences in skill level/presentation. I can only answer from my experience on this...when I started spinning I was in it for me completely and so I would practice a few hours a week for the love of it and that was it. Once I incorporated it fully into a show then it became so much more because while I do it for love, I also love making people smile and laugh so I drove (and still do drive) myself much harder. I practice(d) hours every day. Like this past winter shows are slow so we practiced minimally but had more fun goofing off. Now show season is kicking up so we practice more and more seriously. When faire starts we will be doing shows all day Sat and Sun and practicing 6 to 8 hours a day the other five days of the week, if not more. I think that is the great defining line for me between when I am fully amatuer and when I am as close to professional as I can get.
Non-Https Image Link
I will also say, many "professionals", including myself, don't really concider themselves as such except in attitude. They still concider themselves students, and I am talking not just poi but in many skilled acts.------------------Pele Higher, higher burning fire...making music like a choir...[This message has been edited by Pele (edited 27 March 2001).]


Pele
Higher, higher burning fire...making music like a choir
"Oooh look! A pub!" -exclaimed after recovering from a stupid fall
"And for the decadence of art, nothing beats a roaring fire." -TMK

Delete

CAINED-AND-UNABLE
member
Location: Manchester
Member Since: 19th Feb 2001
Total posts: 214
Posted:i reakon that everyones ambition as a twirler is bound to be slightely different.I have no ambition to perform in front of large crowds, in the role of the entertainer.i suppose i'm at my happiest when im practicing with people of all disciplines. I love the atmosphere of practicing when your surrounded by people all practicing,poi,juggling,staff,diablo,uni-cycling,snake-boarding etc. I love the atmosphere at my local club. Everyone is really friendly and loves to share moves, hints, and tricks. I dont believe that the applause of a crowd can fulfill me more than helping eager and truelly interested people to learn poi. Conversly,i love the fun of spinning on my own. practicing a new move, nailing it, and then adding it to a routine or a combo which you can then share with ya friends is loads of fun.

Delete

Ade
Are we there yet?
Location: australia
Member Since: 14th Mar 2001
Total posts: 1897
Posted:For me, like others who have posted, performance is not my main goal either. I have performed in front of audiences as part of a show (and will be performing solo on Saturday at a friends party), but it's not my main focus - it's kind of like a by product of people knowing I spin (they ask, I can't help myself and say yes... )Playing with poi for half an hour each morning is a fantastic way to start the day, and is quite meditative. Playing with poi for hours on the weekend while spinning to music gives the same feeling. Twirling a staff is the same. I get in to the rhythm of the tool I'm working with, and different ways of moving my body with the poi or staff. Like a walking meditation.

Delete

Posted:I guess I should add some clarity to my otherwise seemingly obscure question.
Non-Https Image Link
I didnt mean performance as a goal. or as a final point (after which you stop developing). What I meant was, do you think that ending up in a performance role is what happens semi-automatically (its a natural function of) when (if) you reach that level of skill? ie those among us that are REALLY into it, will end up as performers of some kind? I dont personally believe this, however I would like to know what you believe...Thanks for your input ppl!Josh


Delete

adamrice
adamrice

poo-bah
Location: Austin TX USA
Member Since: 19th Dec 2000
Total posts: 1015
Posted:Interesting question. Obviously everybody'll have a different take. Here's mine:When I started doing this, not too long ago, it was with no aspirations of performance. But having performed (not professionally, just for fun) in front of friends, I've really come to appreciate having an audience. I'm not saying I'm the best twirler they've ever seen--anything but (though in some cases, I'm the *only* twirler they've ever seen). And it's funny, I'm not really conscious of the audience (I mean, I know they're there, but I'm not thinking about it) while I'm twirling, so it's not as if I'm feeding off their energy. But I'm reminded of the old riddle "if a tree falls in a forest and there's nobody there to hear it, does it make a noise?" Somehow having people watch makes it more real, or more special, or something. I should say that so far, I've always had an audience, even if it is just an audience of one--my safety person. This ties in with Pele's question about onstage and offstage personas--the offstage me would be too self-conscious. The onstage me isn't.All that said, I practice without fire every day, and sometimes I really get into that too. And one of my best performances (perhaps the best) was in front of an audience of just two fellow twirlers.[This message has been edited by adamrice (edited 27 March 2001).]

Laugh while you can, monkey-boy

Delete

Pele
Pele

the henna lady
Location: WNY, USA
Member Since: 15th Dec 2000
Total posts: 6193
Posted:Okay, Josh, that being clarified, I don't think it is an inevitability. I have seen people in skills who are amazing, beyond some pro's I know, who never want to perform and there are those of us who are naturally dramatic and so of course performance is in the cards.I dunno, life takes us in interesting turns and it seems that even the shyest can perform (kudos Adam) while even the most outspoken of us has reservations on stage (I get **horrible** stage fright) and doesn't want to share. I guess all I am saying is nothing is inevitable, not even what might be deemed as "semi-automatic" progression.Is this closer to the opinion you wanted??------------------Pele Higher, higher burning fire...making music like a choir...

Pele
Higher, higher burning fire...making music like a choir
"Oooh look! A pub!" -exclaimed after recovering from a stupid fall
"And for the decadence of art, nothing beats a roaring fire." -TMK

Delete

Posted:Yes - your opinion on the question I meant was what I wanted
Non-Https Image Link
Thankyou all!Josh


Delete