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minimaniac


minimaniac

The Ladiees Man
Location: near swindon/ oxford

Total posts: 360
Posted:does anyone do african drumming in the uk that want to jam at the next big meet?

I'm going to leave the army and run away to the circus

if not i will just become a MI5 agent !!!

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house_of_mill
GOLD Member since Jul 2004

house_of_mill

old hand
Location: Manchester England

Total posts: 896
Posted:I'd love to be doing drumming as me and Trippy bought some Bongo's at the weekend would be very nice to know what I'm doing with it!

*Thats one of my favourite Nurseries over there,*

Roman, Trippie Hippie,On the way back from Play Festival

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DeepSoulSheep
GOLD Member since Sep 2002

DeepSoulSheep

Carpal \'Tunnel
Location: Berlin, Ireland

Total posts: 2617
Posted:Step 1 for learning the bongos is the Martillo. Good luck!
http://www.congaplace.com/instrument/bongo/martillo.php


I live in a world of infinite possibilities.

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Vixen
SILVER Member since Jan 2004

Vixen

Carpal \'Tunnel
Location: Oxfordshire/Wiltshire, United ...

Total posts: 3276
Posted:Where did u buy them from? xxx

tHeReS gOoD aNd EvIl iN EaCh InDiViDuAl fIrE, iDeNtIfIeS nEeDs AnD fEeDs OuR dEsIrEs.

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house_of_mill
GOLD Member since Jul 2004

house_of_mill

old hand
Location: Manchester England

Total posts: 896
Posted:Some little shop in Falmouth they were only a tenner too

*Thats one of my favourite Nurseries over there,*

Roman, Trippie Hippie,On the way back from Play Festival

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Stone
GOLD Member since Jun 2001

Stream Entrant
Location: Melbourne, Australia

Total posts: 2830
Posted:Thanks DSS, thats a great site.

We are just back from confest (hippy festival wink) and are really keen to get into drumming. Jembe is popular, but Im wondering if there is an any advantage in learning bongos first? Funnily enough in Oz, people use bongos to describe any hand drum.

cheers smile


If we as members of the human race practice meditation, we can transcend our fear, despair, and forgetfulness. Meditation is not an escape. It is the courage to look at reality with mindfulness and concentration. Thich Nhat Hanh

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Pyrolific
BRONZE Member since Jan 2001

Returning to a unique state of Equilibrium
Location: Adelaide, South Australia

Total posts: 3289
Posted:nup stone! get a Jembe, or Congas, the little bongos will get drowned out in a decent sized circle smile

we have been having stomping tribal drum jams the last few months at our fire jams in Adelaide. IVe been getting right into playing jembe its been greeeat!

Josh


--
Help! My personality got stuck in this signature machine and I cant get it out!

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DeepSoulSheep
GOLD Member since Sep 2002

DeepSoulSheep

Carpal \'Tunnel
Location: Berlin, Ireland

Total posts: 2617
Posted:<edit>In a later post, I contradict myself, perhaps I'm older and wiser, perhaps moody smile</edit>



Yea a djembe's what you want (edit:maybe consider a bougarabou). Conga's are expensive and not that suited to a drum circle, they're better as an accompaniment to a band. Same for bongos, both are usually michrophoned.



They're played with a completely different technique and the basic rythems themselves are more difficult to learn.



Djembe's the best place to start...be carefull what you buy if you're going to buy one though, it's easy pay too much for a lemon if you're not carefull.

EDITED_BY: Solas (1159393803)


I live in a world of infinite possibilities.

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Stone
GOLD Member since Jun 2001

Stream Entrant
Location: Melbourne, Australia

Total posts: 2830
Posted:cool thanks guys smile

DSS, my flatmate has a Djembe so that Ill try that for a while. I know what you mean about lemons, so once I get the feel I think Ill take lessons and then buy one. Not plastic though. Im booked into DJ school for the next few weeks wink

Josh those stomping tribal drum jams sound wicked. I know it makes a huge difference when we get drummers at our Eddy gardens fire circle. I think Ive been negligent in my drum circle etiquette, as Ive been viewing drummers and dancers as different entities, when dancers are really part of the drum circle. Look forward to hearing some of your drumming.

I really blown away by all the resources for beginners on the net, and I love this attitude of helping percussionists at all levels become better players by sharing information and fostering understanding.

Share what you know, learn what you don't.

The only thing I know in addition to the Bass, Tone & Slap is spreading your fingers to produce a muffled Tone.

cheers smile


If we as members of the human race practice meditation, we can transcend our fear, despair, and forgetfulness. Meditation is not an escape. It is the courage to look at reality with mindfulness and concentration. Thich Nhat Hanh

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Vixen
SILVER Member since Jan 2004

Vixen

Carpal \'Tunnel
Location: Oxfordshire/Wiltshire, United ...

Total posts: 3276
Posted:surely u would notice if you were buying a lemon instead of a drum? xxx

tHeReS gOoD aNd EvIl iN EaCh InDiViDuAl fIrE, iDeNtIfIeS nEeDs AnD fEeDs OuR dEsIrEs.

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Pyrolific
BRONZE Member since Jan 2001

Returning to a unique state of Equilibrium
Location: Adelaide, South Australia

Total posts: 3289
Posted:hmmm someone should start a 'learning djembe thread' smile

*looks around expectantly*

wink

Josh


--
Help! My personality got stuck in this signature machine and I cant get it out!

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quiet


quiet

analytic
Location: bristol

Total posts: 503
Posted:djembe is definitely the way forward

it's extremely difficult to learn drumming from paper/internet, though. best to find someone to teach it.


ture na sig

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DeepSoulSheep
GOLD Member since Sep 2002

DeepSoulSheep

Carpal \'Tunnel
Location: Berlin, Ireland

Total posts: 2617
Posted:It is more difficult to learn anything through text or through a web site when compared to one on one tuition.

The fact is, that if you are genuinely interested in developing your own ability, there is loads you can do on your own.....and hence loads you can learn from other resources.

Try Djembefola.com, there is free tutorial videos and other hints and tips.

smile


I live in a world of infinite possibilities.

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Durbs
BRONZE Member since Sep 2001

Durbs

Classically British
Location: Epsom, Surrey, England

Total posts: 5688
Posted:I love my little djembe, though I've never had proper lessons in it...

I've played drum kit for years, and so the rhythms come fairly naturally, until I try and play along to someone who knows African rhythms in which case it just goes squiffy smile


Burner of Toast
Spinner of poi
Slacker of enormous magnitude

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Pogo69
SILVER Member since Apr 2006

Pogo69

there's no charge for awesomeness... or attractiveness
Location: limbo, Australia

Total posts: 3764
Posted:bouncebouncebounce

I ubblove my djembe too... I have very little idea what I'm doing with it, but can generally blend with a drum circle "OK"... I keep meaning to join up with one of the regular drum circles round here, but no time lately...

I've played the guitar forever... started the djembe to inject some "rhythm" into my music...


--pogo (pat) [forever and always]

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[Nx?]
BRONZE Member since Nov 2001

[Nx?]

Carpal \'Tunnel
Location: Europe,Scotland,Both

Total posts: 3749
Posted:I hate jembe.

ok, i'll qualify that.

I hate djembe when its being played by peaple who know very little about rythum and even less about listening to other peaple they are playing with. you could have three good drummers and they would be totally swamped by two guys on two big slack djembe's.

And peaple who bring them to clubs and play them by the speaker as if thier knoledge of rythum and sound was far superior to the guy who spent months making whatever tune they are riding roughshod over.

begginers should get bongoes, and leave the big guns to the experianced players.

sorry, im coming across as harsh again, but its a pet hate.

forget djembes, go for tarrabouka (sp?) much nicer, and similar technique.

T wave

p.s. african rythums are all 12/8, thats why.


This is a post by tom, all spelling is deleberate
-><- Kallisti

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newgabe
SILVER Member since Mar 2005

newgabe

what goes around comes around. unless you're into stalls.
Location: Bali, Australia

Total posts: 4030
Posted:I so completely agree with you. The usual combination of poorly skinned untuned (tuning is utterly essential and can take days) drums played overloud, and badly, by people with minimal musical knowledge, sensitivity or respect is just appalling. Most people who bang around with these things would do enough musical damage with an egg shaker, let alone a giant drum. Some drum circles indeed rock ( especially when there are skilled bass players or a variety oftypes of drums) but the vast majority are a soup of lowest common denominator (usually djembe) bashing of no rhythmical interest at all. About as much like African (polyrhythmic) music as jumping up and down on a bunch of out of tune violins is a string quartet.



I know many expert players who can make, tune and play their djembes with great skill. It took them years. But it is so rare to find someone who can play subtley or responsively. I so recognise your description of those chaps who sit by the speaker and then play something else entirely...



I now wince inside whenever I even see a djembe.. and it is a great pleasure to meet someone who CAN play nicely with others. One person I know who does is a talented multi-instrumentalist who uses conga hand techniques on a Remo (totally synthetic) drum.



And yes, I do drum myself. I have for 15 years. I started with djembe then congas and now play middle eastern percussion (bass darabouka etc). In drum circles (eg Moonfest) I usually hang out with the dun dun or bell players, who are trying to offer a beat/ rhythmical structure apart from thudthudthud.



Some jokes:

How do you know when a djembe player is at the door?

The knock speeds up



How do you know when there's a djembe group at the door?

The knock speeds up and slows down at the same time



How does a djembe player know when you're at the door?

You broke the window after knocking for half an hour


.....Can't juggle balls but I sure as hell can juggle details....

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Durbs
BRONZE Member since Sep 2001

Durbs

Classically British
Location: Epsom, Surrey, England

Total posts: 5688
Posted: Written by: [Nx?

]
p.s. african rythums are all 12/8, thats why.



Yeah, but it's more than that...
Rhythmically I can play happily in most time signatures, 5's, 7's, 12's etc - but there are certain "feels" in African (and any other non-Western) music which I struggle to click with.

Why I'm now trying to learn tabla is anyone's guess wink


Burner of Toast
Spinner of poi
Slacker of enormous magnitude

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bender
GOLD Member since Nov 2001

still can't believe it's not butter
Location: Melbourne, Australia

Total posts: 6979
Posted:this thread is not an incentivefor me to haul my djembe up for common ground... methinks i'll stick to bringing other bulky stuffs in the car...

Laugh Often, Smile Much, Post lolcats Always

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DeepSoulSheep
GOLD Member since Sep 2002

DeepSoulSheep

Carpal \'Tunnel
Location: Berlin, Ireland

Total posts: 2617
Posted:Bender, bring your drum! smile

A traditional set up for a djembe ensembe would include 3 dun duns (I found some pictures here - http://www.canopus22.demon.co.uk/music/projects/sb/dunduns.html)
and usually 2 djembes (though just 1 sounds amazing).

The dun duns are of a different size and pitch from the deep booming doundounba, the middle (most important) sangban and the high beep beep of the kenkeni (which sounds amazing). The dun dun's are the music and are the rythm. They are what differentiates traditional rhythms and what keeps it together.

One of the djembe's (usually the least experienced of the 2) will keep an accompaniment, which is contant and hooks in with what the dunduns are doing. This is what most people would be playing in a drum circle. The other djembe solos over the top. The solo is to enhance the rhythm, bring up the energy, speed it up and most importantly to mark and accentualte the dancers steps.

Traditionally a soloist's role in not seen as more important than any other part of the ensemble, but in reality it is a magnet for ego, misunderstanding etc. We play with dancers in this traditional setup and it is very very differnent to what you would have heard if you have only heard drum circles playing.

From what I can see the problem with djembe's is that they are loud and overpowering. In their tradtional role this fits their role perfectly. However I think in general they can be unsuitable for drum circles. Also the tendency to solo over the top of others is also fine in a traditional role but perhaps less suitable in a drum circle.

The leading drum circle facilitator here in Ireland, doesn't use djembes. He uses bougarabous, which look similar, but are far more mellow (and melodic) due to the their shape and fact they have cow in them and not goat. He also doesn't allow soloing.

The beauty of a drum circle is that anybody can join in. This is also it's downfall and in my experience there has to be someone "in charge" facilitating it if the participants are not experienced. Even with experienced players there must be limits and some kind of structure.

People starting out should just not loud as they can. Listen to others and don't be afraid to ask more experienced players. There's certainly no reason to be shy just be aware of others, including those playing and listening. If you're going to buy a drum just to use at a drum circle consider a bougarabou, conga, kpanlogo or dun dun.

Darbouka?!!! Ouch! wink

West african drumming is not always 12/8 btw. smile


I live in a world of infinite possibilities.

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newgabe
SILVER Member since Mar 2005

newgabe

what goes around comes around. unless you're into stalls.
Location: Bali, Australia

Total posts: 4030
Posted:Well said James.



And Bender, of course bring your djembe! If you play it as well as you do everything else it would be a pleasure to hear...


.....Can't juggle balls but I sure as hell can juggle details....

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[Nx?]
BRONZE Member since Nov 2001

[Nx?]

Carpal \'Tunnel
Location: Europe,Scotland,Both

Total posts: 3749
Posted:*bows to james*

yeah, dun dun is much nicer.

when i listen to some really good african drumming it reminds me of insects in the forest, a rythum that pulses in and out but dosnt seem to have a defined bar to it. is great!

Im not drum master, but i know how to play well with others wink

T wave


This is a post by tom, all spelling is deleberate
-><- Kallisti

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[Nx?]
BRONZE Member since Nov 2001

[Nx?]

Carpal \'Tunnel
Location: Europe,Scotland,Both

Total posts: 3749
Posted:oh and durds this might be why wink

T wave


This is a post by tom, all spelling is deleberate
-><- Kallisti

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Durbs
BRONZE Member since Sep 2001

Durbs

Classically British
Location: Epsom, Surrey, England

Total posts: 5688
Posted:Y'see - people aren't out of time, they're playing with microtiming wink

Agree with Bender though, this whole thread does come across as pretty negative to anyone wishing to learn Djembe...


Burner of Toast
Spinner of poi
Slacker of enormous magnitude

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jeffhigh
GOLD Member since Oct 2005

Member
Location: Caves Beach, NSW, Australia

Total posts: 89
Posted:I have a band that plays west african style with drums(djembes, dununs). bells. shakers and vocals.
We play as a 6-7 member group, mostly traditional arrangements with multiple parts.
Playing this way is a world apart from the average drum circle.
It also helps that some of us have been playing together for 7 years
Playing at Civic Park Newcastle this Saturday at noon


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Stone
GOLD Member since Jun 2001

Stream Entrant
Location: Melbourne, Australia

Total posts: 2830
Posted:djembes rule


Im a learner and I think as long as people put their ego in their back pocket then there are no problems.



: )


If we as members of the human race practice meditation, we can transcend our fear, despair, and forgetfulness. Meditation is not an escape. It is the courage to look at reality with mindfulness and concentration. Thich Nhat Hanh

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newgabe
SILVER Member since Mar 2005

newgabe

what goes around comes around. unless you're into stalls.
Location: Bali, Australia

Total posts: 4030
Posted: Written by: Durbs



... this whole thread does come across as pretty negative to anyone wishing to learn Djembe...





Kinda the opposite I thought.. something like..

if you want to play one of the world's loudest instruments in public, it's a really good idea to *learn* it. rolleyes Commonsense really.



I guess it comes up more talking about djembes cos there isn't that many saxophone circles around. You know, where people bring lots of them with dodgy reeds and blow whatever they feel like for hours... ubblol



oh crikey, maybe that's what they do in West Africa these days eek


.....Can't juggle balls but I sure as hell can juggle details....

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maus
BRONZE Member since Jul 2005

maus

Carpal \'Tunnel
Location: Sihanoukville, cambodia

Total posts: 4191
Posted:Bad Djembe playing is absolutely horrific.

I've had quite a few Djembe lessons, and because of that it's almost made me quite reluctant to play in Drum circles at meets etc.

The reason for this is I'm used to Dun Dun's leading and then working into it. Holding back, using eye comtact to let others solo etc. Also all of the rythms I know are African rhythms and so when they're played alongside european rhythms,(which is what a lot of people tend to play) I find it hard to slot myself in anywhere.

Djembe is an amazing thing to learn, and it feels so good when you have everything closely knotted together. You're no longer a load of people sitting in a drum circle, you're all just hands working in the same rhythm.

What was my point again? umm feck it who knows..

Anyway, it rocks! Learn it! But learn it respectfully! biggrin


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DeepSoulSheep
GOLD Member since Sep 2002

DeepSoulSheep

Carpal \'Tunnel
Location: Berlin, Ireland

Total posts: 2617
Posted:Well said Maus, repecting djembe's tradition and history is worth talking about.

At drum circles play african, cuba, haitian (voodoo), sufi and other middle eastern stuff.

Gabe, you made me laugh out loud again. That's twice in a week. I''ll be stealing those djembe jokes for my website! smile


I live in a world of infinite possibilities.

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ammre
SILVER Member since Sep 2004

ammre

Member
Location: New Jersey, USA

Total posts: 37
Posted:I'm one of those middle eastern players. nice alumnium dumbek with a synthetic head and a strap. Weather resistant, not very heavy, no requirement for a seat... it's nice and easy.

I have a djembe though. I do pull it out sometimes but only really when i'm pissed off at a circle. When they decide that the solution for every beat is to speed up, or when no one seems to want to sit still long enough to maintain a base beat, i'll bring out the djembe and just Doum away the base beat on it. I know that i'm not expierenced enough on that perticular drum to do flourishes and fancy stuff so i understand that it's ok to just keep the basic heartbeat.

I'm not saying a djembe or dumbek is better then the other, i just happen to like middle eastern rythms and the side hold style better. There's something langerious and seductive about spinning poi to a Samai, perferribly with a lryical instrument on top of the rythem.


that which yeilds is not always weak.

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bender
GOLD Member since Nov 2001

still can't believe it's not butter
Location: Melbourne, Australia

Total posts: 6979
Posted:i like to slap on skin
:P


Laugh Often, Smile Much, Post lolcats Always

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Page: 12

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