Forums > Social Discussion > Home Education / Home Schooling

Login/Join to Participate
Page: 12
Sym
BRONZE Member since Sep 2004

Sym

Geek-enviro-hippy priest
Location: Diss, Norfolk, United Kingdom

Total posts: 1858
Posted:Having just half read the Sex Education Thread I started thinking about Home Education and how people who have been home educated fit in with school educated people.

Were you home educated? What are your views on it? Would you want to home educate your kids?

This is the same as home schooling for all you Americans / people who call it that.


There's too many home fires burning and not enough trees

Delete Topic

Doc Lightning
GOLD Member since May 2001

Doc Lightning

HOP Mad Doctor
Location: San Francisco, CA, USA

Total posts: 13920
Posted:I think it CAN be great. I've also seen it used as an excuse for doing no schooling at all.

-Mike )'(
Certified Mad Doctor and HoP High Priest of Nutella

"A buckuht 'n a hooze!" -Valura

Delete

The Real Fryed Fish


God's illgitament son
Location: state of confusion

Total posts: 1489
Posted:My wife and I discused this for our daughter, we decided that while the actual learning aspect would be better; one on one teaching; they would loose out on ALOT of social interactions. I believe children need the interaction they get at schools......

You can't avoid pain by fencing yourself from it.
Some times you need the help of others more than anything else
But you have to let them close enough to help......
People want to be needed, I found that out too

Delete

Spanner
BRONZE Member since Feb 2003

Spanner

remembers when it was all fields round here
Location: in the works... somewhere..., ...

Total posts: 2790
Posted:I think that's true: as long as the social interaction is positive.



I had a bad time socially at school and it was a problem which continued despite moving schools. I don't believe that a child should be expected to tolerate everything which happens at school on the basis that the same will happen outside of school. On the contrary, it's often vastly different.



My son is beginning school next year but if he was having such difficulties at school to the point where we both felt that educating him at home was more appropriate, I would do so without hesitation. It could mean some sacrifices on my part (and a lot of revision biggrin) but it would be worth it to ensure that my son was happy smile


"I thought you are man, but
you are nice woman.

yay,

:R"

Delete

Medusa
BRONZE Member since Nov 2003

Medusa

veteran
Location: 8 days at Cloudbreak, 6 in Per...

Total posts: 1433
Posted:As someone who works in a college for the government as an education officer I can tell you it is a bad idea if you want your kids to go onto further education.

Nine times out of ten it is the parents teaching the kids what they think they need to know and in regards to that they never get any report cards about their progress.

When applying to college and university you DO need all your results from at least year 11 on...

A number of children have applied to our college who have been home schooled after their parents pulled them out of school for reasons like "they weren't getting a proper education", "they were being bullied" etc...and because they do not have the proper reports and gradings they have not got in...then the parents ring us telling us their child is smart why hasn't s/he got in...if they don't have proof that their child is smart then how are we supposed to know..a parents word is not what we require.

The child then usually has to wait till they are 21 and get in using the mature age entrance exam.

Please keep in mind this view is how it is in the Australian Education Department.

As from a social aspect...I did home schooling for a while (ended up finding out it was a useless waste of time and when I wanted to do further study I also had to do the mature age entry exam) I found my social skills considerably dropped and also my self confidence in approaching people and being able to talk to them.

I would not recommend home schooling.


Delete

Eera
BRONZE Member since May 2003

old hand
Location: In a test pit, Mackay, Austral...

Total posts: 1107
Posted:My cousin was taken out of school when she was young and home educated. She has the social skills of a Pit Bull and no qualifications.

If there's something that makes parents consider pulling their kids out of school (in her case her olds thought the curriculum too restrictive, yeah, I have no idea what that means either) then every effort needs to be taken to sort it out at the root cause instead of running away.

It may be easy for me to say that having no experience of having a bullied child, or whatever, but I cannot see any benefit in taking a child away from an environment where they gain a measure of independence away from their family.


There is a slight possibility that I am not actually right all of the time.

Delete

Gnor
BRONZE Member since Mar 2003

Gnor

Carpal \'Tunnel
Location: Perth, Australia

Total posts: 5814
Posted:So much depends on the childs basic nature and the parents attitude. We have had a few kids through our club that are home schooled and they seem very happy and well adjusted but also find it hard to realise their dreams in the society we have. As Fi said it can be trickier getting into tertiary schooling but that is also slowly changing to accomadate these kids which is fair. We miss out on many talented doctors and teachers due to a fairly rigid entrance system.
As a parent you need to be very dedicated but there is a wealth of information on homeschooling
My sister ended up home schooling her son after he was not allowed back into schools in high school and he learnt alot more at home than he had at school but it was incredibly demanding on her. This kid is now an amazing leader in whatever team he works within but thats his nature not homeschooling.


Is it the Truth?
Is it Fair to all concerned?
Will it build Goodwill and Better Friendships?
Will it be Beneficial to all concerned?

Im in a lonely battle with the world with a fish to match the chip on my shoulder. Gnu in Binnu in a cnu

Delete

Zim
BRONZE Member since Sep 2004

Zim

Former Raver Invader... Not sure what i am now...
Location: Southern California, USA

Total posts: 284
Posted:In my experience everyone who's been homeschooled is socially inept or worse. Maybe even socially... retaded (without the r on purpose and pronounced with a hardcore NY accent)

Yeah the learning aspect is going to be better because at school the class only goes as fast as the slowest person in it... but at school kids are forced to develop the social skills that are essentially essential in life.

Just my humble opinion
-Zim


Clean for 6 months and counting... ah yeah, that's nice.

Delete

lunernia


member


Total posts: 110
Posted:i hated being in the class room, i stopped going to school halfway through yr11, purely because of this. so i went in to home schooling for the last half of the year and it was wonderful. i really enjoyed it.

but its not for everyone.

L x


Delete

Tao Star


Tao Star

Pooh-Bah
Location: Bristol

Total posts: 1662
Posted:i loved school, i got on really well and was pretty much an A grade student. I also think that i learnt the biggest load of [censored] anyone has ever taught me.

i would never send my kids (not that i ave any) through our school system as it is. ok, so i learnt things i have to know like maths and how to spell, but most things that are in the tiniest bit subjective was just a load of rubbish - and my school was a good grammar school.

like history - we never got told about mistakes britain had made, just how great we were with our fab empire and stuff - how is anyone supposed to learn from previous mistakes if our teachers are too scared to to tell us about things that went wrong (or are too embarassed to teach us about sex...)

i would send kinds througha steiner school maybe after some research, or i might teach them at home - i haven't exactly done a lot of research, but i think that the thought of putting my kids through the english school system might make me think twice about having them in the 1st place.

sorry it's a bit off topic, but it annoys me tongue


I had a dream that my friend had a
strong-bad pop up book,
it was the book of my dreams.

Delete

NYC


NYC

NYC
Location: NYC, NY, USA

Total posts: 9232
Posted:I'm not saying they don't exist. I've just never met a home schooled person who doesn't have serious clinical social disorders.

Then again, I haven't met that many.


Well, shall we go?
Yes, let's go.
[They do not move.]

Delete

onewheeldave
GOLD Member since Aug 2002

Carpal \'Tunnel
Location: sheffield, United Kingdom

Total posts: 3252
Posted:Maybe they always had those social disorders, in which case they would likely be subject to extreme victimisation at school, thus becoming prime candidates for home schooling.

Certainly, even if it were the case that most home schooled individuals had social problems (and I'm sure it isn't), we can't conclude from that, that home schooling leads to those problems.


"You can't outrun Death forever.
But you can make the Bastard work for it."

--MAJOR KORGO KORGAR,
"Last of The Lancers"
AFC 32


Educate your self in the Hazards of Fire Breathing STAY SAFE!

Delete

Doc Lightning
GOLD Member since May 2001

Doc Lightning

HOP Mad Doctor
Location: San Francisco, CA, USA

Total posts: 13920
Posted:The thing about proper home schooling is that the teacher (i.e. whoever is doing the homeschooling) should be sufficiently educated to teach the subject material. I frequently see parents without any education beyond high school trying to homeschool children. Now, when you can barely do basic math yourself, how are you going to teach your child algebra, let alone trigonometry or calculus? I mean, I have a Master of Science degree in molecular biology and I'm 7 months shy of my M.D. and even *I* wouldn't feel comfortable teaching, say, NYC's high school chemistry class. (I never did understand red/ox reactions).

Now, I have seen this done very well in the situation where a group of parents get together and start a small "school" of their own where they teach 5-10 kids and each parent teaches a different subject. But in general, this requires a parent who is a math expert (engineer, etc.), a parent who knows literature, social science, etc. So this plan works well in college towns where there are a bunch of professors who can homeschool their kids. I know of a few cases (2 or 3) where this has worked quite well.

Other than that, the fact remains that the basic disciplines of Readin, 'Ritin, and 'Rithmetic have to be taught. And you don't learn biology by just taking a field trip to the zoo. That's my main objection to homeschooling; the lack of credentialing, the lack of standards, and the lack of supervision.


-Mike )'(
Certified Mad Doctor and HoP High Priest of Nutella

"A buckuht 'n a hooze!" -Valura

Delete

ieuan
BRONZE Member since Sep 2003

holy man
Location: Upstate, NY, USA

Total posts: 110
Posted:I was home schooled from 2nd grade until 11th grade. For my senior year, I went to school so I could have a regular diploma. I graduated in the top of my class and went to two years of community college. I planned on transfering to a four year college, but decided to take a year off. I didn't end up transfering because in the year off, I realized I didn't want to do what I had studied for. I've been working for the last five years, but plan to go back now that I decided what I want to do.



When it comes to actually doing school work, back in the day it was really strick(at least in New York state). Every year you had to notify the school district that you were home schooling, even if you did it the year before, and give them the info of the textbooks you were using and they decided if your work was sufficient for the year. Every three months you had to write quarterly reports and tell them what your children had accomplished and much work you actually did in the quarter. At the end of the year you had to take the IOWA or CAT tests just like everyone else. It had to be supervised by a New York State certified teacher, and they were sent in a graded just like the schools. I had friends who graduated early, or took college courses early, one of my friends did an intership with nasa for areonautics or something like that. Others worked with the public school advisors to get into the colleges they wanted and they had no problem. I knew a few people who took advantage of the system, and it was party central all day, but most did what they were suppose to. If you didn't CPS would show up at your door and take your kids. Believe me, I saw it happen to a few people.



As far a social interaction goes, it's what you make it. I played travel sports with the public school kids, took 12 years of piano lessons, went out with friends, had dates, the whole 9. I had lots of friends who home schooled, and we all interacted fine with others "outside out bubble". When it came time for college or work, we melded into society just like everyone else. At the time, most people didn't even know I was home schooled. Social interaction and involvement is even easier today, because the whole home education system is alot more widely accepted and organized than it was when I did it back in the 80's.



People think I'm normal....that is until they find out I spin giant balls of fire around my head..... ubblol

EDITED_BY: ieuan (1098301060)


Gather your harps from the willow trees, dust off the ancient strings. Call the bards and prophets, let them sing healing and freedom. Let light and love flow from the strings, colors of revelation.

Delete

Doc Lightning
GOLD Member since May 2001

Doc Lightning

HOP Mad Doctor
Location: San Francisco, CA, USA

Total posts: 13920
Posted:ieuan has a good point... SUPERVISED homeschooling is unfortunately not the rule in many states around here.

Hey, I had homeschooled classmates at Stanford and they did great.


-Mike )'(
Certified Mad Doctor and HoP High Priest of Nutella

"A buckuht 'n a hooze!" -Valura

Delete

*PiPeR*


*PiPeR*

stranger
Location: Australia

Total posts: 38
Posted:Home schooling, like any other type of schooling, can be done properly or improperly. Unfortunately in some countries the system for home schooling is so lax and disorganised that it is consequently abused more often than it is used properly. This is not a reflection on the concept of home schooling, but an indication that the system it is organised through is not effective.

I am a 17-year-old student in Yr 11 in Australia. I was home schooled for Yr's 2 and 3. My mum pulled me out of school because the local one I had to attend was run by a 60-year-old nun who turned out to have depression and anxiety attacks not the best of learning environments. Following Mum's decision to do this, the state board for home schooling provided her with certified textbooks, course outlines and subject lists to help her teach me to the best of her ability. They also provided her a list of local groups to join so I would develop the oh-so-important, ever illusive 'social skills'. Weekly I would go to gym, have piano lessons, go to cub scouts, play tennis and netball, and meet up with and go on excisions with other home schoolers in the area. My social life, and education quality, was leaps and bounds ahead of that of the ordinary school students around where I lived.

In Yr 4 my Mum developed health issues that meant she couldn't teach me anymore, but by this time she had found a good school in the area. I was enrolled, and fit right in, finishing my first year with Dux of Yr 4 (beats me why they have dux for kids so young, but there you go) AND the citizenship award.

Through this story, I hope you can understand that in different circumstances, school or home schooling may be the right choice for a child. I love school (although now Ive hit VCE its bloody torture at times!) but I also enjoyed home schooling and I hate to think where Id be now if I continued to struggle through primary school under the rule of the ancient nun. There are a lot of intelligent people out there with very advanced social skills who were home schooled, just as there are people who attended school who have zero IQ and no social skills. Of course, the comparison can also be made the other way round.

So maybe it is the system rather than the concept that should be nit-picked
theres a lot of promise behind both ideas of schooling and home schooling if they are used correctly

***Here end the schooling rant*** ubbrollsmile


~*PiPeR*~

Delete

NYC


NYC

NYC
Location: NYC, NY, USA

Total posts: 9232
Posted:Lighning brings up a good point.



I don't know anyone, including myself, qualified to teach all subject areas.



I know there are other factors.



I can imagine situations where home schooling would be the best option. Unfortunately, I think those that MOST that undertake it are a bit naive as to what it truely entails to educate.


Well, shall we go?
Yes, let's go.
[They do not move.]

Delete

Kyle McLean
BRONZE Member since Jul 2003

Kyle McLean

Living it up
Location: Brisbane/Berlin, Australia

Total posts: 364
Posted:I spent quite a bit of time in world schooling. To the best of my knowledge it has not left me with any serious clinical social disorders ubbloco...
Lots of points have been made so I do not want to go repeating any of them. If anyone has a genuine want of more info and perspectives on the subject then I would highly recommend a book called "The Teenage Liberation Handbook". I think people often simply try to take a system of education that is not working for their child and import it as is to the home. I know that there are many legal reasons in many places that make it quite hard to use other (more modern) systems but I think in the long term it is a good idea to be a bit more open to educational change. The idea that this is just the way it is and has to be and yeah it is tough but it will prepare you for the realworld(tm) is imho BS. Please take this with a grain of salt, it is not meant to offend ( ubblol -just my lack of social skills popping up)


Contact without dance is like sex without wiggling.
A) it does feel as good
B) it does not look as good on film

Delete

Kyle McLean
BRONZE Member since Jul 2003

Kyle McLean

Living it up
Location: Brisbane/Berlin, Australia

Total posts: 364
Posted:Written by: Medusa


As from a social aspect...I did home schooling for a while (ended up finding out it was a useless waste of time and when I wanted to do further study I also had to do the mature age entry exam) I found my social skills considerably dropped and also my self confidence in approaching people and being able to talk to them.

I would not recommend home schooling.



Hey Medusa hug
I am sorry if your home schooling was not a positive part of you life. Do you have any ideas as to how it could have been done better for you?
As for further education in Australia, mature entry is in fact only one pathway, there are others. I undertook an ATP course in QLD (they have them in other states under other names I think) that has the same function as your last years of highschool. I had a great time with it, did well with my grades and made some great friends (there were people of all ages doing it, which I thought made a VERY nice enviroment to learn in). The big thing is that it only took one year of my time, as opposed to twelve. smile
Love & stuff,
K


Contact without dance is like sex without wiggling.
A) it does feel as good
B) it does not look as good on film

Delete

Medusa
BRONZE Member since Nov 2003

Medusa

veteran
Location: 8 days at Cloudbreak, 6 in Per...

Total posts: 1433
Posted:Interaction with people would have made it better for me.

I was never a confident person to start off with and home schooling took away the challenging of having to face people on a daily basis and dealing with my self confidence.

In WA you can do the mature year 12 but it costs quite a bit and when you have limited resources and want to further your education you really don't have much of a choice.

I think each case should be judged individually however. So your experience was good and I am happy that at least one person that I have now spoken to who has been home schooled hasn't had any problems.

I do agree with Lightning that no one person knows all subjects so how can a parent be qualified to teach you everything you need to know.


Delete

twistedfirestarter


twistedfirestarter

member
Location: OZ

Total posts: 53
Posted:i dont know, home schooling could be great. But i think you need the atmosphere of a proper school and all teh children. It seems like maybe you'd be a little sheltered from other things in life. But i doont know ive never done it sooo...but if i had kids id send them to a school.

~*~peace and trust takes years to build, yet takes only seconds to shatter~*~

Delete

fake teeth and glue
BRONZE Member since Aug 2003

fake teeth and glue

Checking who's online, watching you!
Location: somewhere, England (UK)

Total posts: 1972
Posted:it strikes me that allot of people here don't know much about home education.(!)

you just lost the game!!!!!! !!!!!

knowledge is power, power corupts, study hard, become evil.

Delete

trixy
BRONZE Member since Aug 2003

trixy

member
Location: Milton Keynes and Kingston Upo...

Total posts: 100
Posted:(lightning) I swear if I was in a room with you and heard you say that I would not be able to restrain myself from hitting you. I really have no time for people with such a narrow-minded view of education. Education is defined, as the gaining of knowledge, what a person learns while young should ready them for life. Education does not have to follow a prescribed curriculum or be dictated and imposed by others. What people learn is what they need to know NOT what others think they should know.



What right do you have to say what people should learn or how parents should bring up their children? I have been home educated for most of my life (I went to school for a while to see what it was like, because I wanted to see a different point of view, but quickly left having seen the reality of school ‘education’) I am predicted Bs and As in my final year of A-levels and have applied to university. I feel because I was home educated and so free to learn at my own pace I have a distinct advantage over those forced to learn a prescribed curriculum, to a timetable that assumes a certain level of knowledge according to a child’s age.



As I have said “how can you say what people should lean?” (Who says we need to know algebra, anyway?) Why should a child be forced into a school to do biology, and what makes you think that home educated children don’t have the same supervision, structure of learning and standards as school educated children. Apart from the fact that I myself have experienced it, there have been many sociological studies that show quite clearly that home-educated children learn a lot more than school educated. This is probably because home-educated children are not forced into over crowded institutions. School educated children quite often don’t want to learn, as is evident by trouble in school, truancy and other forms of lashing out to gain attention (otherwise known as “cries for help”)





As for social interaction let use an example. Lucy is school educated but she no friend, she is bullied by the other children in her class and is generally miserable. Amy is home educated she has around 8 close friends and various people she hangs out with, she attends clubs and social events for home ed children and sees her friend regularly, both at education events and in her leisure time. Personally I have no doubt which I would rather be and what I would want for my children.

However I do concede that my view on home education is what I have seen of it being home and school educated. People’s experience of home education around the world must be very wide ranging and so my views cannot reflect representatively on home education as a whole.



As for applying to university/college you do NOT need to have the result from exams to get in, universities look for a well rounded person that will do well, quite often home educated children do better than school educated children as they are already adept at being confident, self motivated and hard working, mainly because they enjoy learning. Also (in the UK) home educated children can take GCSEs and A-levels without needing to be at a school, it costs about 40 and you need some one to supervise the coursework for some subjects, but exam results are by no means unavailable to home educated children.



I would also like to add that many home educated children never go to school, have no PROBLEMS as someone put it but simply prefer home education, they learn at their own pace, go to college/ Uni if they want and are well rounded confident people. I could name at least 60 people that are better off having been home educated (myself included).



In a lot of countries the system is so strict that parents are unable to teach their children according to what they feel should be taught. This talk of SUPERVISION is in my view a load of c**p, you cannot say what people should/should not learn! Also many teachers, although ‘qualified’ are very bad at teaching, I have encountered people who cannot communicate properly, forget the subject areas and don’t even like kids. Parents on the other hand will of course teach their children to the best standard, as they want them to do well. I also object strongly to people saying “facts” “most” and “generally” unless they have actual evidence to support their claims.



I would like to conclude my little rant by saying that I’m sorry if I have offended anyone with my remarks, as a home-educated person I am of course a little touchy when someone says my education has been a waste. These are my views/experiences and other my have had bad experiences with home education, I don’t think anyone can conclusively say “home education/schooling good or bad” the subject is too wide.



Thank you, Trixy ubbangel

EDITED_BY: trixy (1099324481)


THAT'S ABOUT AS SENSIBLE AS STANDING ON A HILL, IN A THUNDER STORM, HOLDING A GOLF CLUB AND SHOUTING AT THE TOP OF YOUR VOICE /ALL GOD'S ARE *BASTADS* -THE GREAT TERRY PRATCHETT.

Delete

Sym
BRONZE Member since Sep 2004

Sym

Geek-enviro-hippy priest
Location: Diss, Norfolk, United Kingdom

Total posts: 1858
Posted:Written by: trixy
I don't think anyone can conclusively say "home education/schooling good or bad" the subject is too wide.





You're right there, my question was a little silly when you think about it. Very interesting points all though.



I will post my own thoughts when I have more time



xx


There's too many home fires burning and not enough trees

Delete

NYC


NYC

NYC
Location: NYC, NY, USA

Total posts: 9232
Posted:Trixy, you can't cut and paste from word. Otherwise you get the crazy symbols that you have in your thread. I usually type long responses as 'emails' and then spell check them that way, then cut and paste them, since typing on HoP is sometimes tricky. smile

Well, shall we go?
Yes, let's go.
[They do not move.]

Delete

Sym
BRONZE Member since Sep 2004

Sym

Geek-enviro-hippy priest
Location: Diss, Norfolk, United Kingdom

Total posts: 1858
Posted:That depends on your email client.

If you're using Windows / Word try pasting it in to notepad first.

If using OS X it should work, and you should have system wide spell check anyway.

On Linux I doubt there is a problem, bay be best to paste in to an ASCII editor of some sort first though.

Anyway, this is offtopic but worth saying.


There's too many home fires burning and not enough trees

Delete

Doc Lightning
GOLD Member since May 2001

Doc Lightning

HOP Mad Doctor
Location: San Francisco, CA, USA

Total posts: 13920
Posted:Written by:
What right do you have to say what people should learn or how parents should bring up their children?



I have a right to demand that my fellow citizens be able to

1) Read
2) Demonstrate a basic understanding of the American political system.
3) Have an understanding of basic science (i.e. why viruses can't be treated with antibiotics, or why mixing bleach and ammonia is a bad idea).
4) Do addition, subtraction, multiplication, division, basic tric, and have an understanding of basic statistics (the latter being conspicuously absent in american high school curricula).

So yes, I do claim the right to demand that children be educated to certain minimum standards. I also claim the right to demand that children have other basic needs met, too, such as medical care, food, and housing.

It is NOT OK to homeschool your children so that you can use one textbook only: The Bible. It is NOT OK to homeschool your children so that they get no schooling at all.

Believe it or not, boundless freedom to do whatever you like with your kids is NOT a good thing.


-Mike )'(
Certified Mad Doctor and HoP High Priest of Nutella

"A buckuht 'n a hooze!" -Valura

Delete

Zyanya Bella
BRONZE Member since Sep 2003

member
Location: , USA

Total posts: 70
Posted:Ok wow...minor headache reading through all of thta to catch up. First of all I had the priveledge of having both a public and homeschooled education. I left public school after my freshman year and was homeschooled after that. My parents didn't actually teach me, I taught myself. I found that I learned more,I learned faster, and I learned better. As far as the social aspect goes all you have to do is enroll the kid in something like scouts, rec sports, if you're religiously inclined take them to church. There are a lot of things in the outside world a child can do and meet other people. I can't say I'm more fo rhomeschooling than public schooling. I think its a case by case basis. I was bored in public school and the teachers had to many students to take care of to challenge me properly. It all depends on the child. And by the way NYC....I'm far from socially retaded.... wink

Always Beautiful

Delete

ieuan
BRONZE Member since Sep 2003

holy man
Location: Upstate, NY, USA

Total posts: 110
Posted:Written by:
I have a right to demand that my fellow citizens be able to

1) Read
2) Demonstrate a basic understanding of the American political system.
3) Have an understanding of basic science (i.e. why viruses can't be treated with antibiotics, or why mixing bleach and ammonia is a bad idea).
4) Do addition, subtraction, multiplication, division, basic tric, and have an understanding of basic statistics (the latter being conspicuously absent in american high school curricula).




Aside from reading, and basic math(addition, subtraction, multiplication, division), I think you'd be hard pressed to find a majority of people who understand basic politics, can do stats, or trig either home or public schooled. Alot of people I know can't even spell and write decent cursive. But who are you to demand all those things?

What's with the attack on the Bible? Not everyone who homeschools is a Bible thumpin' right wing, conservative, holy rollin', homophob. There are a hundred other reasons to home school besides religious conviction.

So what if a person wants to use the Bible as basis for their curriculum? Just because you don't think it's credible source doesn't mean that it isn't. You'll find just as many people useing Bible based curricula as non Bible based, and the Bible based people know the same things but with a "right wing-nut job" twist. Also for the record, considering the country was founded and based on the Bible(I'll get a thousand arguments on this one, but is true), and the more we get away from it the worse off the country is. The country was founded on biblical priciples and that's fine if the majority wants to change that, but the bottom line is our system of government won't work on non-biblical priciples. Just take a look. It's half Bible and half non-Bible and it's not working to well. Yet I stray.

Lightning-Sorry if I took your post wrong, and perhaps I missed someone else's Bible reference, but everytime these things come up, you jump in and pull religion into things and go on the defensive before anyone has even started the offense.

I was home schooled and the Bible was the basis for my curriculum. I take offense to your sweeping statement. Just like you have posted many times before, I too get tired of having people jump to conclusions, make judgements, and discriminate against me not because of my sexual orientation but because of my religious one.
I don't have a problem with what you stated. I have a problem with HOW it was stated. It was condescending, demeaning, and showed intolerance.

I am a conservative christian, but I don't bomb clinics, I don't judge people who don't agree with what I think or my world view, I don't hate people of other sexual orientation, despite common stereotyping. I am just tired of being told that I have to be tolerant, respectful and loving of other people and their position(s), when others don't grant me the same.


Gather your harps from the willow trees, dust off the ancient strings. Call the bards and prophets, let them sing healing and freedom. Let light and love flow from the strings, colors of revelation.

Delete

onewheeldave
GOLD Member since Aug 2002

Carpal \'Tunnel
Location: sheffield, United Kingdom

Total posts: 3252
Posted:Written by: ...Lightning...


I have a right to demand that my fellow citizens be able to

1) Read
2) Demonstrate a basic understanding of the American political system.
3) Have an understanding of basic science (i.e. why viruses can't be treated with antibiotics, or why mixing bleach and ammonia is a bad idea).
4) Do addition, subtraction, multiplication, division, basic tric, and have an understanding of basic statistics (the latter being conspicuously absent in american high school curricula).
.........................................

It is NOT OK to homeschool your children so that you can use one textbook only: The Bible. It is NOT OK to homeschool your children so that they get no schooling at all.

Believe it or not, boundless freedom to do whatever you like with your kids is NOT a good thing.



I just want to point out that going through the education system doesn't guarantee any of the above.

In the UK adult illiteracy is rife, many schoolchildren can't read to any useful extent.

I'm not disagreeing with what you say, but there does seem to be an underlying assumption that home schooling can lead to deficits that would not be there if children went to school.

Bad home schooling can lead to problems, but, for many, so will school.

Given that some are successful in schools, and some are successful when educated at home, it's fairly obvious that which option is best varies with individuals.


"You can't outrun Death forever.
But you can make the Bastard work for it."

--MAJOR KORGO KORGAR,
"Last of The Lancers"
AFC 32


Educate your self in the Hazards of Fire Breathing STAY SAFE!

Delete

Doc Lightning
GOLD Member since May 2001

Doc Lightning

HOP Mad Doctor
Location: San Francisco, CA, USA

Total posts: 13920
Posted:Written by:
Alot of people I know can't even spell and write decent cursive. But who are you to demand all those things?



An educated, tax-paying (yes, I do pay taxes in spite of being a student), productive member of society.

That's who I am.


-Mike )'(
Certified Mad Doctor and HoP High Priest of Nutella

"A buckuht 'n a hooze!" -Valura

Delete

Page: 12

Similar Topics

Using the keywords [education schooling] we found the following similar topics.
1. Forums > Home Education / Home Schooling [35 replies]
2. Forums > ***Adults Only*** [140 replies]
3. Forums > (poll) education level [38 replies]
4. Forums > the state of education today [61 replies]
5. Forums > gold coast poi spinners/jugglers/contact jugglers for home education [5 replies]

     Show more..