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caz86
Twister Fire Starter ridin on a tratter
Location: Bristol/Exeter UK
Member Since: 27th Oct 2003
Total posts: 156
Posted:Hey, I'm looking to pick yer brains about re-furbishing my wicks. I've got some regular metal tube core wick ma-thingy-ma-jiggers and I'm wondering if it's possible to just buy some new kevlar and bolt it on. If so how easy is it? And does anyone know an non-online place to buy said kevlar?!

Cheers

Caz


Caz


vanize
vanize

Carpal \'Tunnel
Location: Austin, Texas
Member Since: 21st Aug 2001
Total posts: 3899
Posted:answers: yes to one, not hard to two, and no to three.



but really the kevlar is the expansive part. the tube and bolts only run a couple of euros, so generally make everything new when I make poi wicks.



different story on a staff though...


-v-

Wiederstand ist Zwecklos!


caz86
Twister Fire Starter ridin on a tratter
Location: Bristol/Exeter UK
Member Since: 27th Oct 2003
Total posts: 156
Posted:Ok thankyou!

Caz


vanize
vanize

Carpal \'Tunnel
Location: Austin, Texas
Member Since: 21st Aug 2001
Total posts: 3899
Posted:I could send on some tips for remaking your wicks, but if you just carefully note how the others were put together as you take them apart, you'll learn all those for yourself.

and I feel that all fire performers should have intimate knowledge of how their gear is made so they have a better idea of how to manage it's maintinance, so I fully encourage you to get into this project.


-v-

Wiederstand ist Zwecklos!


caz86
Twister Fire Starter ridin on a tratter
Location: Bristol/Exeter UK
Member Since: 27th Oct 2003
Total posts: 156
Posted:Yey! Yeh tips would be great. Although I'm kinda leaning towards monkey's fists now I've learn't how to tie the knots. So far I've made some new chains and handles....but I'm goin on a search for quick links.

Thanks for your help,

Caz


Caz


azura29
newbie

Member Since: 20th Dec 2005
Total posts: 1
Posted:was wondering if you had any info on how 2 clean my fire poi anything would be advantages to me.


mcp
mcp

Flying Water Muppet
Location: Edin-borrow.
Member Since: 20th May 2003
Total posts: 5276
Posted:take the kevlar off and put it n a washing machine. (synthetic wash) wink

"the now legendary" - Kaskade
"the still legendary" - Kaskade

I spunked in my friend's aquarium and the fish ate it. I love all fish. Especially the pink ones. They are my bitches. - Anon.


Suibom
Suibom

addict
Location: Oregon, USA
Member Since: 2nd Sep 2005
Total posts: 577
Posted:Heya Meg, define the wink icon for me again.. i'm still a little fuzzy on that one..

wink


Definition of poi- A Hawaiian food made from the tuber of the taro that is cooked, pounded to a paste, and fermented.

Ahnold discussing poi - "It is naht a toober!"


mcp
mcp

Flying Water Muppet
Location: Edin-borrow.
Member Since: 20th May 2003
Total posts: 5276
Posted:well, it's all to do with context, in the context above it means: I'm sooo old-school and cool that I can make ultra ironic jokes like this.

"the now legendary" - Kaskade
"the still legendary" - Kaskade

I spunked in my friend's aquarium and the fish ate it. I love all fish. Especially the pink ones. They are my bitches. - Anon.


_Clare_
_Clare_

Still wiggling
Location: Belfast
Member Since: 22nd Oct 2002
Total posts: 5967
Posted:And surreptitiously wreck some poor person's wick so they have to buy pook ones?


I know your evil plans woman.

ubbangel



smile


Getting to the other side smile


i8beefy2
i8beefy2

addict
Location: Ohio, USA
Member Since: 24th Mar 2003
Total posts: 674
Posted:Actually, I'd like to hear how people do this too. Rewicking a staff (or tube core poi, same concept) is a $!%@#. My current method uses three screws per wick. First I take a length of 4" wicking and lay it on my staff about where I want it. I put one short screw (size: whatever I can scavenge up) through the middle of the end of the kevlar tape, thus securing the end of it to the pole so I can pull it nice and tight. Then I wrap it up, fold about 2" under, and get ready for the part that I really hope someone has a better way to do...

First I chose where I want my screws (read: best place to hold everything down) and I hold a finishing washer over the spot. Then I take something long and thin (a drill bit usually, maybe the end of a coat hanger...) and I begin digging through the kevlar to the pole. I then take a few minutes widening it out and such. Then I take my drill with the 1/4" drill bit (I use big stainless screws... I used to break them a lot) and put it on REVERSE drill (meaning it spins left / doesn't actually drill jack) and begin working it down through the layers of kevlar, drilling only minimally to get down to the pole. If you have it on forward drill, it tends to eat loose kevlar strings and generally make a mess of things. Then once you have it where ya want it, you put it on foward drill, hold down the finishing washer really hard to prevent kevlar getting eaten up in the drill bit, and drill a hole. Take it out, replace with screw, tighten, done.

Now the problem I have is REWICKING. Now when I do stuff I keep in mind how long the kevlar needs to be to line up exactly the old kevlar, etc. You can take the old stuff off and cut some the same length too. But for some reason no matter how you wrap it up, or something, the holes never seem to line up right with your kevlar. And drilling new holes will have your equipment lookin like swiss cheese after a while. You can FIND the holes by poking down again and doing as above without the drill (maybe use a small screwdriver, or an awl). Just fold under how ever much you need to to put everything where you want it.

Some tips and ideas I have then:

1. Secure the wick to the staff with a screw prior to wrapping to get it nice and tight. This is rather hard without securing it.
2. Use finishing washers when drilling, etc. It holds everything together nicely. ie put it where you want it, and hold it down for the rest of the entire process. This way you never let the kevlar go slack, you can put a nice even pressure down on the exact area your drilling / poking through, etc. It really makes things easier...
3. Use a small screwdriver or awl to punch down through wrapped kevlar prior to trying to put a screw into it. This can also help find predrilled holes, and will create a path for your screw to get through the kelvar without messing things up.
4. If drilling new holes through kevlar, make sure that you (a) do number 3 FIRST ... the drill bit needs a path too, and (b) run the drill in reverse, not forward, when pushing down through the holes in the kevlar. This will help the drill bit go down through the kevlar hole easier, and will prevent the bit from catching on much of the kevlar. And remember the finishing washer is a big help here!!
5. Don't put the screw too close to the very end... If for some reason you drop it and the end gets buggered up then your screw hole will also get all messed up, which means you won't be able to reuse it. In fact, I mount my kevlar about 1/4" in from the extreme end to allow for just this occurance as its ruined a staff for me before. Further, make sure you secure the corners of the kevlar to the staff with the screws, but make sure the finishing washers are 1/4" to 1/2" in from the edges of the kevlar. You don't want anything sticking up as it usually disintegrates quicker that way. This SHOULD hold everything down nicely. Adjust as needed.
6. If rewicking / using predrilled holes, use a sharpie or something to mark where the holes are on the staff prior to wrapping the kevlar. Obviously you want to put the mark somewhere visible after wrapping to give you a good idea where to go digging for the holes.
7. If redrilling mounting holes, try and do them at a 90 degree angle to the prior holes.
8. I recommend 1/4" stainless steel / galvinized steel screws. Hold up better to heat. You'll curse yourself for not using them if you ever have a screw break off in the hole...



Zauberdachs
Zauberdachs

enthusiast
Location: The village of Edinburgh
Member Since: 28th Jul 2004
Total posts: 220
Posted:um... ok.

I would wick a staff like follows:
1. wrap wick really tight round stick.
2. tape it on.
3. Drill a hole through Kevlar and tube using electric drill and normal drill bit.
4. screw into hole (using d-cup).

After three screws the wick is secure and the job is done in say two minutes tops? When re-wicking repeat the above, I wouldn't bother fannying around to find the old holes, rather use better quality wick so you have to rewick less.

only other advice would be to splash for a cobolt drill bit for an extra couple of bucks and then you'll only break a couple of year maybe smile

Written by: mcp

take the kevlar off and put it n a washing machine. (synthetic wash) wink



I've done this, I like to think it washed come of the built up cr*p out but then I've no proof that it did so. Certainly doesn't ruin it or anything...


The insults of your enemy are a tribute to your bravery wink


d-eye
d-eye

Member
Location: Canberra
Member Since: 5th Mar 2005
Total posts: 60
Posted:to wick originally.(Aluminium staff)

Pre drill holes - make sure you measure how far in they are and mark what line they are on.

use masking tape to holld the end of the wick to the staff.

Wrap wick tightly, fold end over and tape down so the fold is above the line where the holes are.

Measure in distance for holes and use a nail to push a small hole through the wick to the hole in the metal.

hand screw in the screw.

to rewick, measure the distance for the holes then wick as above.



i8beefy2
i8beefy2

addict
Location: Ohio, USA
Member Since: 24th Mar 2003
Total posts: 674
Posted:Ok, maybe Im just a perfectionist... smile



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