dangerboy
dangerboy

original member
Location: Vancouver, BC, Canada
Member Since: 14th Dec 2000
Total posts: 205
Posted:Maybe someone who has done multiple weapons training can answer this question for me. Is it better to go practice for an evening and bring three or four toys to play with, or only play with one toy per evening, or maybe even only play with one toy for a week or two before switching? It's tough when you have five different toys that are all clammoring to be mastered.------------------Earth my body, water my blood, air my breath, fire my spirit

Earth my body, water my blood, air my breath, fire my spirit

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Posted:It's all what you're comfortable with. I was doing well with working three tools, spinning torches, fire eating torches, and poi. I added staff and wasn't able to keep it all up. I dropped staff and added fire fingers and those four work better for me. In all, I'd offer the following: get a solid foundation in one tool before going to another. I studied torches for maybe nine months before I started eating and doing transfers. Another three to six months before I really started poi. On the other hand, sometimes with multiple tools, like torches and poi, one will help you learn the other. Play around, see what works for you. And remember, the tools will always be there.
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Diana


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Pele
Pele

the henna lady
Location: WNY, USA
Member Since: 15th Dec 2000
Total posts: 6193
Posted:Once again, sage advice from Diana.I also think if you have similar tools then those can be put together. For instance. I have taken to training with poi and ropes in one night and staff and torches on another, my silk scarves and contact juggling stuff another night, grouping them by similarities. In the end I usually end up working with all of them to build my routines. I also agree about spacing out when you start up a new toy. I give new ones at least two months before even concidering something new...though I write down all of my ideas so as not to lose them in the shuffle I call a brain.Best to you------------------Pele Higher, higher burning fire...making music like a choir...

Pele
Higher, higher burning fire...making music like a choir
"Oooh look! A pub!" -exclaimed after recovering from a stupid fall
"And for the decadence of art, nothing beats a roaring fire." -TMK

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dangerboy
dangerboy

original member
Location: Vancouver, BC, Canada
Member Since: 14th Dec 2000
Total posts: 205
Posted:speaking of multiple toys, i have taken to spinning a single staff in one hand and a poi in the other. They weave together really nicely, and it's something you don;t see very often (in fact, I've never seen it). In that respect, training with multiple toys can be a good thing.

Earth my body, water my blood, air my breath, fire my spirit

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Drake
member
Location: Oakland, CA, USA
Member Since: 22nd Feb 2001
Total posts: 72
Posted:i agree that grouping by similarity is a good idea. now if you have five toys or so that you are working with you might not have time to practice all of them thoughly in the same night. i dont recomend doing one thing for a week and than switch and abandon the first thing. do all of your things consistantly and often. and some of your toys will be similar and you can use these similarities to transition. now when you start out your practice session i find it wise to start with what you are weekest at so you have as much time as possible to improve and you have all of your energy to put into what your doing. this is also true if you are more dominat in oe hand than the other....start with your least dominant side and then switch to your more and back and forth and then when they feel more equal it shouldnt matter which you start. but also keep in mind that you should try not to overdevelop one side and not the othr at the same time. be even and consistant. and do what feels good and right.DRAKEkatafunk@hotmail.com

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CAINED-AND-UNABLE
member
Location: Manchester
Member Since: 19th Feb 2001
Total posts: 214
Posted:I agree with Diana, as i was just starting to attend my local circus skills club, its easy to become a "jack of all trades", without becoming a master of any of them.Now that i've been poi'ing for over a year, i dont seem to practice as much at home as i used to.But when i go to the club, i like to practice my staff, juggling and snake-boarding. But I deffinately know that i'll never be truely good at the juggling or staff. My only major twirling discipline is poi, and im not prepared to slow down or stop practicing that just so i can become mediocre at another skill.peace-out.C-an-U

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TheCleaner
member
Location: phoenix, Az, USA
Member Since: 5th Mar 2001
Total posts: 23
Posted:please take this with a grain of salt. All skills are parishable. Fatigue will frustrate and lead to bad habits with any endeavor. My vote is to take a few. When you get to a point were you're fatigued or not making what you personally consider forward progress, put it down and work at something else. From a Very very newbe, think of how you trained when you first began. Did you work relentlessly at a skill? Did you work on something else when you were stuck? On the other hand, did you put it down altogether to come back to it later?

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