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BRONZE Member since Feb 2003

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remembers when it was all fields round here
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Posted:Spies face Iraq weapons inquiry

The report will be published in June. Although the hearings will be private, I'm hoping that this will answer more questions than the Hutton Inquiry did.

Has anyone seen any other coverage of this? I spotted the article just before bed last night and thought it would be all over the news this morning confused


"I thought you are man, but
you are nice woman.

yay,

:R"

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Raymund Phule (Fireproof)


Raymund Phule (Fireproof)

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Location: San Diego California

Total posts: 2905
Posted:Umm it says you have to be registerd to view that page... can you copy/past that article please?

Some Jarhead last night: "this dumb a$$ thinks hes fireproof"

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Spanner
BRONZE Member since Feb 2003

Spanner

remembers when it was all fields round here
Location: in the works... somewhere..., ...

Total posts: 2790
Posted:Most odd...I'm not registered either, so I wonder why they won't let you view it confused

OK, I will quote it. But just this once...

Quote:
January 30, 2004

Spies face Iraq weapons inquiry
By Michael Evans, Peter Riddell and Philip Webster

Did MI6 get it wrong over Saddam's arsenal, ask MPs?

TONY BLAIR is facing an inquiry into the intelligence that led Britain into war with Iraq, dashing his hopes of drawing a line under an affair that has dogged his Government for months.

The head of the intelligence service, MI6, is to be summoned before a new parliamentary inquiry, which will examine the accuracy of the information about Saddam Husseins weapons and will report in June, The Times learnt last night.

The disclosure came on the day that Greg Dyke resigned as the BBC Director-General over the David Kelly tragedy, and the corporation apologised to the Government, prompting Downing Street to declare that its war with the BBC was at an end.

In an exclusive interview with The Times yesterday, Mr Dyke said that he expected to be asked to stay on when he offered his resignation to the BBC governors.

Mr Dyke, describing how he had lost the support of his board, added: "If in the end you screw up, you have to go."

Later, addressing BBC staff who staged demonstrations protesting against his departure, the outgoing Director-General was in tears. Mr Blair's keenness to close the damaging battle was explained by the findings of a Times/Populus poll today showing that, despite the Hutton report's exoneration of him, his ministers and officials, the public believes that he has been damaged almost as much as the BBC by the affair.

In better news for the Prime Minister, the survey also found that two thirds of voters now believed that the war with Iraq was justified because of the removal of Saddam.

Sir Richard Dearlove, the head of MI6, will appear before the Intelligence and Security Committee, headed by Ann Taylor, the former Labour Cabinet minister, to give further evidence on why he believed that the intelligence on Saddam's weapons was reliable and accurate.

It was MI6 that provided the bulk of the intelligence for the Downing Street dossier that underpinned Mr Blair's decision to go to war.

Although the hearings will be in private, the committee's report will be published.

Unless the Prime Minister agrees to Opposition demands to hold a public inquiry into why Britain went to war in Iraq, the parliamentary committee will be the only body in a position to ask more questions of the key players in the intelligence community. It will also be able to take on board the findings of the Hutton inquiry, and remarks by David Kay, who resigned as the leader of the Iraq Survey Group after stating that he believed no weapons of mass destruction (WMD) existed in Iraq.

The committee has already given its verdict on the Government's dossier on Iraqs weapons, in a report published on November 11. Like Lord Hutton, it cleared the Government of the allegation of "sexing up" the intelligence, but acknow-ledged that MI6 had found it challenging to glean secret material from inside Iraq because of Saddam Hussein's comprehensive security apparatus.

Whitehall officials said that MI6 remained confident that its key contributions were based on reliable and authoritative sources. The other agencies, such as GCHQ, the signals intelligence centre, also contributed to the dossier, but most of the new secret material came from human, not electronic, sources, according to the officials. They said this included the assertion in the dossier that Saddam had restarted small-scale production of chemical weapons. This, they said, was fresh intelligence. Sir Richard and other officials from the intelligence community will have to explain to the parliamentary committee why they remain confident that their assessment of the state of Iraqs WMD programme at the time of the dossier, published in September 2002, was correct.

Ms Taylor's committee is likely to ask Sir Richard whe-ther he is still happy with the sourcing of the now-notorious 45-minute claim relating to the time that it would take for the Iraqis to deploy chemical and biological weapons. Lord Hutton was facing a backlash yesterday from critics who have dismissed his report into the David Kelly affair as a "whitewash".

The refusal of some Tory MPs and sections of the media to accept the report's conclusions is alarming Downing Street, which fears that "politically motivated attacks" will undermine efforts to draw a line under the controversy. Sir Christopher Bland, a former BBC chairman, questioned the even-handedness of a verdict which exonerated the Government but "tarred and feathered" the BBC. Lord Rees-Mogg, a former vice-chairman of the BBC and former Editor of The Times, said: "I don't have any confidence in Hutton. I have not fully read his report but I have already come to the conclusion ...that it is a bad bit of work."

Mr Dyke's departure, 24 hours after the resignation of Gavyn Davies as Chairman of the BBC Board of Governors, made the long-demanded apo-logy to the Government possible. Richard Ryder, the acting Chairman, said: "On behalf of the BBC, I have no hesitation in apologising unreservedly for our errors."

Mr Blair immediately welcomed his words. "This for me has always been a very simple matter of an accusation that was a very serious one that was made. It has now been withdrawn. That is all I ever wanted."

He added: "I want to make it absolutely clear I fully respect the independence of the BBC. I have no doubt that the BBC will continue, as it should do, to probe and question the Government in every proper way. What this does now is allow us to draw a line and move on."

Alastair Campbell, Mr Blair's former communications director and leading pursuer of the BBC, was equally happy to declare the matter closed. "All we have ever wanted was for these allegations to be withdrawn. I'm glad that has now happened and I want to thank Richard Ryder."

He said he had "no interest" now in what happened to other BBC personnel involved in the affair such as Mr Gilligan, adding he wanted to build a new life outside No 10.

Mr Blair's spokesman said: "The Prime Minister believes that two decent and honourable men have done the decent and honourable thing and it is time, as he said, to move on."

Mr Dyke said he, too, wanted to draw a line under the episode.

"Throughout this affair my sole aim as director general of the BBC has been to defend our editorial independence and to act in the public interest," he said.

A new BBC chairman will be appointed by Mr Blair by Easter. Then the governors will appoint a new director general. In the meantime Mark Byford has been named as the acting operational chief.

The Populus poll for The Times found that barely a third of people think Lord Hutton's inquiry will make a "positive difference" to the tone in which public life is conducted and to the way that the Blair Government behaves.

Nearly two-thirds think the inquiry will positively affect how "the BBC reports news stories in the future," while more than half believe it will change the way that "politicians make their case for military conflict in the future".



2004 Times Newspapers Ltd (can be deleted on request).


"I thought you are man, but
you are nice woman.

yay,

:R"

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Raymund Phule (Fireproof)


Raymund Phule (Fireproof)

Enter a "Title" here:
Location: San Diego California

Total posts: 2905
Posted:Thank you Spanner for posting the article, BTW you quoted the source and what not so I doubt anyone will complaine. If you can do it in a school report why not on the web?


Yep it is interesting and well... kinda not going to effect me really, but perhaps the US will be exeriancing something similer soon. But it is interesting to see what is going on an ocean away.


Some Jarhead last night: "this dumb a$$ thinks hes fireproof"

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