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Forums > Help! > So i'm making a staff, and now i'm stuck!!

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Silvur
BRONZE Member since Mar 2017

Silvur

sumthin sumin smmnm....
Location: home sweet home

Total posts: 372
Posted:so i got this idea one day, to make a staff out of wood. so out i went a hunting, and returned with a big hunk of birch. well, many days later, it's now been carved and sanded, and it's beautiful!!!

my only problem is this: how do i make it so that when the wicks are on, the wood doesn't catch fire? i know theres probably a really simple way that i just don't know cuz i've never done this before, but i don't know what to do!!!

please help!


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polythene


veteran
Location: London/ Surrey

Total posts: 1359
Posted:Aluminium heat guards (bits of tube fixed on) each end are definitely a good idea. All the wooden staves I've seen have had a flame-resistant covering (like aluminium tape) along the length of the staff, but if you have a beautiful piece of birch it seems a shame to cover it... i don't know if there's something clear you can coat it in.

Personally, if I had such a beautiful piece of birch, I would keep it as it is for a practice/non fire staff, and get some cheap dowell for fire, because sooner or later that piece of birch will be black and spoiled.


The optimist claims that we are living in the best of all possible worlds.
The pessimist fears this is true.

Always make time to play in the snow.

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Cinderpup
SILVER Member since Apr 2003

Cinderpup

member
Location: Somerville, MA

Total posts: 30
Posted:Yeah, I dunno how you'd cover to make it so that yo ucould still see the wood. But I use electrical tape. the whole flame retardant thing is fun fun fun Plus it jus looks damn cool

And where I go the flame shall follow. Be warmed by my outward souls flare and may it guide you through darkened paths.

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Cody
SILVER Member since Sep 2003

Cody

That guy from Reno
Location: Reno, Nevada USA

Total posts: 556
Posted:All you need to do is either wrap the ends in metal tape or a piece of pipe that fits snug. You don't have to cover the whole length. It takes quite a bit of heat to catch a wooden shaft on fire. Usually just the ends eventually start to show some heat damage. I suggest beeswax for the length of the shaft. It will protect the wood and it gives a nice grip. I have made many fire staffs like this and they work great.

Cody Canon
Controlled Burn, Reno Nevada

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Ade
SILVER Member since Mar 2001

Are we there yet?
Location: australia

Total posts: 1897
Posted:another method that I have been using for years for my wooden staffs is, a secret recipe, handed down to me by my first staff teacher

<bows in thanks>

use a can

take an aluminium can
cut off the top and the bottoms and what do you have?

a curly bit of metal long enough to wrap around the end of your staff

to hold it in place, and this is the fun bit, use hose clamps

the clamps do need checking and tightneing sometimes

to attach the kevlar - attach with a screw that goes through the kevlar, aluminum and into the wood

but I have to agree - use a bit of crappy broomhandle wood, save your birch for a beautiful practice staff


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Silvur
BRONZE Member since Mar 2017

Silvur

sumthin sumin smmnm....
Location: home sweet home

Total posts: 372
Posted:thanx for the advice! i like the beeswax idea, and i found some metal tape from the tinbasher on the site where i work. i also asked ami and she said that on hers she had this copper sheeting that was really thin (kinda like tinfoil but thicker?) that she had both ends wrapped in. i found some at an art store in the scrapbook section.

well, i have to make another one anyways, cuz ive dropped it a couple of times on my driveway, (a bad idea, i know)and the one end chipped but i fixed it with some carpenters glue. i just don't know how well it will hold up now....


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vanize
SILVER Member since Aug 2001

vanize

Carpal \'Tunnel
Location: Austin, Texas

Total posts: 3899
Posted:don't forget to cap the end too.

The Aluminum tape works really well in my experience (I only use wooden staves - I hate metal ones), and you only need to extend in a few inches down from the wicks. It's not the heat that destroys the wood, it's the fact that the wood oxidizes when it burns - no oxygen, no burnt wood. The aluminum tape stands up to a lot of heat, doesn't burn, and keeps the O2 away from the wood.

just remember to cover the very tip too. One layer of the aluminum tape on the ends first, folded over carefully and then secured by the aluminum tape you wrap around cyndrically.

I like the aluminum can idea too, but knowing me, I'd cut my self with an exposed edge while I was spinning (I seem to be more subject to Murphy's law than most people).


-v-

Wiederstand ist Zwecklos!

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Lasa'nta Dubh Mac Tire


member
Location: LA... Pine Oregon

Total posts: 51
Posted:i know this has been said but hey good use of words eh anway. i didn't have money to buy a staff so i got a nice pine broom handle and some steel conduit. and shaved the staff at the ends down alittle and sliped about 8 inches of the pipe on and bolted it. that way you can take it off and such and you can add dif sizes and make it heavy or light good thing.. big holes all down the pipe for air ~nods~ =^_^=

Nothing goes through the Lunitics dark mind... By his own Decaying HeartI love the little tacos... I love them goood G.i.rI'm gunna roll around on the floor for abit k? G.i.r

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Cody
SILVER Member since Sep 2003

Cody

That guy from Reno
Location: Reno, Nevada USA

Total posts: 556
Posted:The conduit extensions on the end works well too. I have one that keeps the wick about 1/2" away from the wood. I have holes drilled in the pipe to attatch the wicking, vent air, and reduce some of the weight. With the the additional metal on the ends, the staff does get much heavier, but it spins nice too. It depends on what you want. Light and agile vs heavy but true. I suggest ash wood broom handels for a staff. It is flexable enough to take hits. Oak is ince too but they tend to break, it's too strong. And the ash is cheap.

Cody Canon
Controlled Burn, Reno Nevada

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Silvur
BRONZE Member since Mar 2017

Silvur

sumthin sumin smmnm....
Location: home sweet home

Total posts: 372
Posted:quote:Originally posted by Cody:
I have holes drilled in the pipe to attatch the wicking, vent air, and reduce some of the weight. why do you need to vent air?


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Cody
SILVER Member since Sep 2003

Cody

That guy from Reno
Location: Reno, Nevada USA

Total posts: 556
Posted:It's mostly an added observation to the other benefits of drilling holes. The ventilation that happens to occur can help keep the heat away from the wood and it prevents a place for fuell to well up and splash out. Or the trapped fuel could explode. Especially white gass.

Cody Canon
Controlled Burn, Reno Nevada

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Ade
SILVER Member since Mar 2001

Are we there yet?
Location: australia

Total posts: 1897
Posted:quote: I like the aluminum can idea too, but knowing me, I'd cut my self with an exposed edge while I was spinning (I seem to be more subject to Murphy's law than most people).

You'd be suprised, it's probably the hoseclamps that you actually have to watch out for I really like this method of making my wooden staffs, nothing else seems to appeal to me as well. It's not the most efficient method, but one that I like.


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Silvur
BRONZE Member since Mar 2017

Silvur

sumthin sumin smmnm....
Location: home sweet home

Total posts: 372
Posted:well, i put aluminum tape on the ends and sealed them up so that the ends are airtight. i am planning on putting that copper shite on the ends over top of the tape. do i still need to vent?

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Cody
SILVER Member since Sep 2003

Cody

That guy from Reno
Location: Reno, Nevada USA

Total posts: 556
Posted:Not if your wraping the wick around the wood part. You should be fine.

Cody Canon
Controlled Burn, Reno Nevada

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Silvur
BRONZE Member since Mar 2017

Silvur

sumthin sumin smmnm....
Location: home sweet home

Total posts: 372
Posted:so over the top of the aluminum tape i put tooling copper that i bought at a craft store. this way, there is no air to the wood, and the tips are protected if i ever drop it and i can attatch my wicks to it. once i buy them, that is. and you still see the wood!!

cookie, anyone? they're peanut butter!!
*waves them around, temptingly*


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Cody
SILVER Member since Sep 2003

Cody

That guy from Reno
Location: Reno, Nevada USA

Total posts: 556
Posted:OOOOOH Peanut Butter. I'll take one.

Sounds prefect do you know where you are going to buy your wick from?


Cody Canon
Controlled Burn, Reno Nevada

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fake teeth and glue
BRONZE Member since Aug 2003

fake teeth and glue

Checking who's online, watching you!
Location: somewhere

Total posts: 1972
Posted:can i have a coockie

you just lost the game!!!!!! !!!!!

knowledge is power, power corupts, study hard, become evil.

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bender
GOLD Member since Nov 2001

still can't believe it's not butter
Location: Melbourne, Australia

Total posts: 6979
Posted:Me uses aluminium flashing (the rools of it are used to fix on guttering and hence are cheeply available from hardware stores)
I tack them on but they are far from watertight (i use flashing only to prevent too much wood charring/disintegration)

a small tack at the tip of the staff holds the four flaps of aluminim that extend to the end.
I just hammer the crap out of the ends into a round point.

voila!


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