MrConfused
MrConfused

addict
Location: I wish I knew
Member Since: 12th Jan 2002
Total posts: 529
Posted:I have a wooden staff, with aluminium around the ends for the wicking. The wick was originally screwed in place, but have found that after a few months of use, the end screws no longer bite into the wood, and are very loose, to the point where they have to be re-attached after every half hour or so of use, or they are likely to fall out. The other two screws on each wick are fine.

I would like to know if removing the loose screw and gluing along the open flap of wick would work (safely hold the wick in place). I've checked out a few old threads, and they seemed to suggest it would, but the use of glue seemed more for preventing fraying than actually holding wick in place.
Thanks for any help.

J


If you're not confused, you're not thinking about things hard enough.

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FireMikeZ
FireMikeZ

Laguna dude
Location: Laguna, California, US
Member Since: 24th Jul 2002
Total posts: 1438
Posted:i'm a virgin kevlar crafter this very coupla weeks. but i have two rumors, and maybe veterans can tell us both more:

(1) besides school glue, "crazy glue" may work as well, and stand up to heat

(2) drilling a hole through your toy (staff in your case) where it serves as the core of the kevlar head/roll lets you then use kevlar thread or even yarn to sew the head in place, and it's kevlar on kevlar, heat-wise (though there might be some stresses against the thread, wear-wise, if it isn't snug)

~ Mike


molten cheers,

~ FireMike

FireMikeZ@yahoo.com (personal messages welcome, no promo spam, please!)
Laguna, California, US

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Maelstrom
Maelstrom

member
Location: Akron, Ohio
Member Since: 12th Sep 2001
Total posts: 135
Posted:White glue works great. After a couple of burns it will get real hard and stick well to the metal. One piece of advise, take sand paper and skuff the heck out of the metal, it will help the glue hold better.

Nothing good ever comes from hanging out with normal people.

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ElectricBlue
ElectricBlue

Now with extra strawberries
Location: Canberra
Member Since: 11th Feb 2002
Total posts: 810
Posted:i was just thinking insted of gluing the wick you could take all the wick of and fill the bit where the screw came from with some kind of wood gap filler. then you could screw the screws back in to the wood and it would be like there was never a hole there.

any who just my 3 cents

Bandaid girl


I {Heart} hand me downs and spinning in the snow.<br /><br />

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adamrice
adamrice

poo-bah
Location: Austin TX USA
Member Since: 19th Dec 2000
Total posts: 1015
Posted:I haven't tried making a staff with a glued-on wick, but I'd be concerned that the coils of wicking would fly outward like a Chinese yo-yo when spun, unless every winding was glued to the last. Even then, I'd want something more secure. I haven't found a glue yet that has enough structural strength to satisfy me for something like this.

When I construct a staff, I drill straight through the wood, and run a machine screw from one side of the wicking bundle straight through to the other, where I anchor it with a screw post.


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FireMikeZ
FireMikeZ

Laguna dude
Location: Laguna, California, US
Member Since: 24th Jul 2002
Total posts: 1438
Posted:what about thread/yarn sewing, adam?

they look more like a finished edge, not so obtrusive, but you don't trust them, and always favor some nice steel like a screw or a bolt, huh?


molten cheers,

~ FireMike

FireMikeZ@yahoo.com (personal messages welcome, no promo spam, please!)
Laguna, California, US

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adamrice
adamrice

poo-bah
Location: Austin TX USA
Member Since: 19th Dec 2000
Total posts: 1015
Posted:One thing that might be worth trying (but I haven't, yet) would be to anchor the wick using machine screws, as I usually do, but leaving a long flap of kevlar tape hanging loose. Wrap that around once or twice again, and then sew that down with kevlar thread. It would be a lot of fooling around, but it would cover the hot metal.

My concern with using only thread to affix anything is that it can wear through. Staves see a lot of abuse, especially around the wicks, and I think they need to be built to take it.


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Fire By Riz tm
member
Location: tampa fl usa
Member Since: 31st Dec 2001
Total posts: 212
Posted:Jep

I dont know how much trouble you want to go through what you might try is going to a home depot type store in the cabnit dept you will find threaded inserts for wood the inserts are made from metel all you do is dril the right size hole in the wood for the insert then install the insert with a litle wood glue that will give you metel to metel contact on your conection . then when you put the new bolt through your wick put a little high temp lock tight on it..

I dont make wooden staves but i pretty much use that same theaory on my aluim ones insted of a insert i dril a hols and tap theards into the staff.. i also use hidden hardware i run the bolts through my 1st 2 wraps around the staff then glue the wicking toghter with a high temp glue then finish my wick and glue and sew the end with industarial kevlar thread.. i have yet to have a wick come off.. and this way you can still change the wick without alot of work cause nothing is glues to the staff its self


I have been cursed with the imagination to envision it all

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[Nx?]
[Nx?]

Carpal \'Tunnel
Location: Europe,Scotland,Both
Member Since: 5th Nov 2001
Total posts: 3749
Posted:humm, the logical thing would be to use 1" flated bolts and just weld the nut into the holes onna staff. Problems are: ally staff, anyone gotta TIG? can you TIG steel nut to ally staff? You could solder, but it woud kneed to be really high temprature. Brass solder would do it, Oxy-aceteline anyone?

N


This is a post by tom, all spelling is deleberate
-><- Kallisti

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Fire By Riz tm
member
Location: tampa fl usa
Member Since: 31st Dec 2001
Total posts: 212
Posted:Nix
good idea but you cant weld steel to aluim
you might be able to get it to stick but it will have no strength..


I have been cursed with the imagination to envision it all

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[Nx?]
[Nx?]

Carpal \'Tunnel
Location: Europe,Scotland,Both
Member Since: 5th Nov 2001
Total posts: 3749
Posted:How about an epoxy putty? (like Milliput)

should be good for 1500 degrees and sets underwater! (humm)

have to mold it round everything, alow for expansion/ect.

other thing is about no metal. why not have a generous overlap and in what is going to be the top make two largish slits (Ive alvays found stanlyknives to be the best cutter of kevlar). then make your holes as normal (much grunting) and when you insert the bolts/screwsthe washer goes under the first layer and ontop of the overlapped wick, the head follows it, fitting it through the first layer. you can sew or glue the top layer up.

disavantage, it will break eventually, and youll have strip hangin off, but you can just cut it off and carry on without hitting yourself (always a low energy alternative). but it would be good for transfers, eating and stuff and it sound a little more hardwearing than sewing it or glueing it.

incedentally, Im recovering from my worst burn jet, and it came from the shaft, not the fastenings. Minero has some lovely little round scars mind you...

have fun,

N?


This is a post by tom, all spelling is deleberate
-><- Kallisti

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SickpuPpy
SickpuPpy

Ninja Rockstar!
Location: Denver, Co. U.S.A.
Member Since: 27th Nov 2001
Total posts: 1100
Posted:Personally I wouldn't trust white glue, but I have heard maelstrom talk up its virtues before so he may be onto something. I would use something like JB weld, wich is an epoxy designed spicificly for metal. It was a very high heat tolerance and is brilliant stuff. I use it to lock all my nuts and bolts in place on my wicks and staff. I have no idea how it would adhere to kevlar itself. I would tend to, as Adamrice first suggested, drill a hole straight through your staff so that you are not anchored into the wood itself, but to a bolt using washers and nuts to hold down your wick, but then I am really big on quality of the toys I build, so once I build it I don't want to have to do a lot of matienence on it, but at the same time if something should go wrong I want to be able to take everything apart and fix it. But then that's just me.

[ 15 August 2002, 15:21: Message edited by: SickpuPpy ]


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Durbs
Durbs

Classically British
Location: Epsom, Surrey, England
Member Since: 23rd Sep 2001
Total posts: 5688
Posted:So I'm thinking of making a set of Pixie Sticks as I have the wood, the alu' tape and the wick lying around home - but the wood is far too thin too screw into really and the wicks aren't going to be massive so the wick-metal ratio will be a little too high as I want to use them for throwing smile

So I heard PVA glue can be used to attach the wicks and found this thread wink Someone else mentioned that the hotter it gets, the harder it gets which sounds good.

Does anyone use this still?


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UCOF
UCOF

Carpal \'Tunnel

Member Since: 17th Apr 2002
Total posts: 15414
Posted:Good Durb there..umm.. Durbs.

smile


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ado-p
ado-p

Pirate Ninja
Location: Galway/Ireland
Member Since: 13th May 2004
Total posts: 3882
Posted:use pva to glue the inside of the wick to the stick



and sew the wick down on outside with kevlar thread.



if the stitching is very strong and solid and plentiful i reckon it'l do the job.



in fact i might try it myself.



edit/



disclaimer, i didnt read the rest of the thread. so i didnt see anything about the thread.



redface



Durbs, i use pva to stop my wicks fraying. it does the job and doesnt melt or anything.

EDITED_BY: ado-p (1099404961)


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UCOF
UCOF

Carpal \'Tunnel

Member Since: 17th Apr 2002
Total posts: 15414
Posted:Good idea there..umm.. ado-p

smile


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Durbs
Durbs

Classically British
Location: Epsom, Surrey, England
Member Since: 23rd Sep 2001
Total posts: 5688
Posted:Hmmmmmm - sewing you say?
I'll ask mum wink


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MrConfused
MrConfused

addict
Location: I wish I knew
Member Since: 12th Jan 2002
Total posts: 529
Posted:Wow, old thread!! Been over two years since my wooden staff broke, doesn't time fly??

Still not too sure if a wick could be completely held on with glue, don't remember exactly how (or if) I solved the problem. However, white glue does firm up quite well - I've used it to hold the somewhat tenuous knots on my ropes in place, and it has stood up to repeated burns without the knots loosening at all. Lots of friction at work there as well, tho; the glue isn't holding things together all by itself.

Alternatively, you could try a bolt straight through the wick and wood, and out the other side, saw off the excess bolt thread when the nut is tight. Depends on just how thin the wood is, I guess.

J


If you're not confused, you're not thinking about things hard enough.

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