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Frenzie
BRONZE Member since Jan 2001

member
Location: Sydney, NSW, Australia

Total posts: 515
Posted:Need to buy some fire retardant spray, anyone have any idea where we can get some in Sydney? Material shops have been of no help in our sitch

- Industrial design knows of no article more useful than the milk crate -

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Dimitri


member
Location: London

Total posts: 26
Posted:Try a local theater supply store.-D

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flash fire
BRONZE Member since Jan 2001

flash fire

Sporadically Prodigal
Location: Sydney, NSW, Australia

Total posts: 2758
Posted:AHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHRGH! I have made a dozen calls to source this stuff today. material shops can't help, theatre suppliers: no, camping/outdoor shops: no, the friken fire brigade won't tell me anything because they are not permitted to 'endorse products'. i eventually got through to a manufacturer and was told their product won't work on the type of synthetic material we have. Yeah, I know - synthetics are dangerous...but dang they look good! fabric is black and comprises 10% polyeurothane, 40% PVC and 50% spandex...I wonder if anyone will write and tell us how stupid we are.
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sorry frenzie. we'll just have to make sure we don't hit ourselves! maybe bring a sample of the material tonight and we can test its reaction to tapping etc.later,flash


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bec
BRONZE Member since Jan 2001

bec

member
Location: Brisbane, Queensland, Australi...

Total posts: 521
Posted:Don't know if it'll help much, but a friend of mine found heaps of bottles of "Flame Guard" being sold out (!!!) at Franklins (a Brissie supermarket - don't know if they do Sydney too)... so maybe you could try that product name in your search (let us know how you get on)...Good luck, as I said it may not help, but who knows...

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Frenzie
BRONZE Member since Jan 2001

member
Location: Sydney, NSW, Australia

Total posts: 515
Posted:My mum is going to test th material today and make sure that its not gonna melt completely under heat :P

- Industrial design knows of no article more useful than the milk crate -

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tkerby


member
Location: Edinburgh, UK

Total posts: 30
Posted:Try mixing borax or boric acid with water. Chemists sell it and it seems to be the basis for most fireproofing of natural fibres. If I remember my chemistry correctly it crosslinks molecules well and will probably get rid of the fluffy ends of fibres where a flame is likely to start to catch.Please don't take my word for this though. I am yet to test it fully myself and I wont be responsible if it all goes wrong!

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Posted:You can always go to the web site of a company that makes the product. they might have a means of purchasing online, have a dealers' directory, or at least an email you can inquire to. Hope this helps. Diana

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Missy


member
Location: Phoenix, AZ, USA

Total posts: 10
Posted:For Flash fire...when we have used synthetic material in the past, (I know, sparklies are irresistable.) We lined them with material that wont melt, you may want to consider making them easy to remove. Both could lessen the damage, and the audience loves it when you are forced to take off your clothing mid show
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Cantus
SILVER Member since Jul 2001

Cantus

Tantamount to fatuity
Location: Down the road

Total posts: 15965
Posted:I'd like a front row seat for the show where Flash and Frenzie take off their clothing mid-show please.*fickle, fickle, fickle*

"I'll carry this....It's harder to spill a hat" - Chellybean
"...like a rabbit caught in a lighthouse?" - Chellybean

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Fire Filly


member
Location: Australia

Total posts: 2
Posted:I think that some circus places have some!
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Maximus


member
Location: Upland, CA., USA

Total posts: 250
Posted:You can make your own flameproofing solution. Here's the traditional recipe:Take nine ounces of borax and four ounces of boric acid and dissolve in one gallon of hot water. Fill a sprayer with it and spray both sides of your costume. You can also spray your hair. It will not stain and will not hurt your hair or fabric. Treatment is repeated prior to each performance.Even, with it, I would still never firedance in synthetics.

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SteelWngs
BRONZE Member since Aug 2001

SteelWngs

member
Location: Malden, Massachusetts United S...

Total posts: 169
Posted:Costumes and fireUnless you are performing naked, every stitch of clothing you wear on stage or when you practice should be considered a costume. Costumes are possibly the most neglected aspect of fire performance. Most people simply do not take the time to make sure the clothes they wear on stage or during a fire practice are properly treated or made from fire retardant material. A few basic precautions can save a performer from a potentially hazardous situation.FabricsFabrics to considerWhen constructing costumes, it is advisable to use natural fibers such as: Nomex or Nomex blended fabrics Treated cotton (ARAMID, fire retardant cotton) PBI cotton leather wool silk kevlar These fabrics tend to have natural fire resistance.Fabrics to avoid PVC and petroleum-based fabrics any polymerized plasticky stuff nylon vinyl PVC costumes may look very flashy, but it is not advisable to use costumes based on this or any similar fabric. The reason is that when they ignite (and they ignite rather easily) the petroleum-based fabric tends to melt as they burn. When the fabric melts, it tends to stick to human skin and causes a nasty burn. It is very hard to get the melted fabric off skin and the melted goo traps heat which intensifies a burn. Think of these fabrics as a stable form of napalm. Once it ignites, it is very hard to extinguish.If you are looking for a flashy costume material, a better fabric recommendation is patent leather.If you choose to wear such fabrics, you should always have a solid layer of cotton or similar materials below the fabric so that if it catches fire and melts, it adheres to the cotton layer before the skin. You may still end up with the melted fabric sticking to your skin, but it could minimize the burns you receive.With any costume you wear, it is highly advisable to do a test burn before wearing it during a performance.Fire retardant spraysFabric retardant sprays can help give materials in your costume an additional level of safety by making them flame retardant. It is important to remember that flame retardant does not mean flame-proof, it simply means it has a tendency to be harder to ignite than a non-treated fabric. Materials will still char and burn with enough heat. If you hold a lighter or a torch to a piece of treated cotton, it will ignite, but maybe not as fast as if you tried to ignite a similar piece of non-treated cotton.Costumes should be treated with a fire retardant on a regular basis. Even a fabric like Nomex can benefit from a re-treating. Especially if the costume gets wet or is washed.Some fire retardant sprays we can suggest are:Rosco Flamex S333 for synthetics Rosco Flamex C26 for cottons of varied weaves FSI fire retardant spray for natural fibers FlamePort Inspecta-Shield by Fire-Shield Rosco products are available at most local theatrical supply companies. FSI can be contacted at (360) 452-9194. Inspecta-Shield by Fire-Shield can be purchased by calling (800) 513-5134.A note about fire retardantsWith most individuals, fire retardant sprays cause some sort of skin irritation. This can be a minor to moderate skin rash. Rashes occur when the skin comes in contact with a costume that has not fully dried after being treated or when the skin which causes the fire retardant to become moist again. The easiest way to deal with this situation is to wear some sort of undergarment between the skin and the costume. A cotton shirt or cotton pajama pants are generally sufficient.

Blessings to all,
Peter
When you find yourself in the company of a halfling and an ill-tempered Dragon, remember, you do not have to outrun the Dragon ...you just have to outrun the halfling.

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SteelWngs
BRONZE Member since Aug 2001

SteelWngs

member
Location: Malden, Massachusetts United S...

Total posts: 169
Posted:Costumes and fireUnless you are performing naked, every stitch of clothing you wear on stage or when you practice should be considered a costume. Costumes are possibly the most neglected aspect of fire performance. Most people simply do not take the time to make sure the clothes they wear on stage or during a fire practice are properly treated or made from fire retardant material. A few basic precautions can save a performer from a potentially hazardous situation.FabricsFabrics to considerWhen constructing costumes, it is advisable to use natural fibers such as: Nomex or Nomex blended fabrics Treated cotton (ARAMID, fire retardant cotton) PBI cotton leather wool silk kevlar These fabrics tend to have natural fire resistance.Fabrics to avoid PVC and petroleum-based fabrics any polymerized plasticky stuff nylon vinyl PVC costumes may look very flashy, but it is not advisable to use costumes based on this or any similar fabric. The reason is that when they ignite (and they ignite rather easily) the petroleum-based fabric tends to melt as they burn. When the fabric melts, it tends to stick to human skin and causes a nasty burn. It is very hard to get the melted fabric off skin and the melted goo traps heat which intensifies a burn. Think of these fabrics as a stable form of napalm. Once it ignites, it is very hard to extinguish.If you are looking for a flashy costume material, a better fabric recommendation is patent leather.If you choose to wear such fabrics, you should always have a solid layer of cotton or similar materials below the fabric so that if it catches fire and melts, it adheres to the cotton layer before the skin. You may still end up with the melted fabric sticking to your skin, but it could minimize the burns you receive.With any costume you wear, it is highly advisable to do a test burn before wearing it during a performance.Fire retardant spraysFabric retardant sprays can help give materials in your costume an additional level of safety by making them flame retardant. It is important to remember that flame retardant does not mean flame-proof, it simply means it has a tendency to be harder to ignite than a non-treated fabric. Materials will still char and burn with enough heat. If you hold a lighter or a torch to a piece of treated cotton, it will ignite, but maybe not as fast as if you tried to ignite a similar piece of non-treated cotton.Costumes should be treated with a fire retardant on a regular basis. Even a fabric like Nomex can benefit from a re-treating. Especially if the costume gets wet or is washed.Some fire retardant sprays we can suggest are:Rosco Flamex S333 for synthetics Rosco Flamex C26 for cottons of varied weaves FSI fire retardant spray for natural fibers FlamePort Inspecta-Shield by Fire-Shield Rosco products are available at most local theatrical supply companies. FSI can be contacted at (360) 452-9194. Inspecta-Shield by Fire-Shield can be purchased by calling (800) 513-5134.A note about fire retardantsWith most individuals, fire retardant sprays cause some sort of skin irritation. This can be a minor to moderate skin rash. Rashes occur when the skin comes in contact with a costume that has not fully dried after being treated or when the skin which causes the fire retardant to become moist again. The easiest way to deal with this situation is to wear some sort of undergarment between the skin and the costume. A cotton shirt or cotton pajama pants are generally sufficient.------------------Blessings to all, Peter "In motion, move like a thundering wave. When still, be like a mountain.Rising up, be like a monkey. Land swiftly and lightly like a bird. Be steadylike a rooster on one leg. One's stance is as firm as a pine tree, yetexpresses motion. Spin swiftly and circularly like a wheel. Bend and flexlike a bow. Waft gracefully like a leaf in the wind. Sink like a heavy pieceof metal. Prey like a watchful, gliding eagle. Accelerate like a gusty wind." Wushu Proverb

Blessings to all,
Peter
When you find yourself in the company of a halfling and an ill-tempered Dragon, remember, you do not have to outrun the Dragon ...you just have to outrun the halfling.

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SteelWngs
BRONZE Member since Aug 2001

SteelWngs

member
Location: Malden, Massachusetts United S...

Total posts: 169
Posted:Whoops, 8) sorry for studdering. ------------------Blessings to all, Peter "In motion, move like a thundering wave. When still, be like a mountain.Rising up, be like a monkey. Land swiftly and lightly like a bird. Be steadylike a rooster on one leg. One's stance is as firm as a pine tree, yetexpresses motion. Spin swiftly and circularly like a wheel. Bend and flexlike a bow. Waft gracefully like a leaf in the wind. Sink like a heavy pieceof metal. Prey like a watchful, gliding eagle. Accelerate like a gusty wind." Wushu Proverb

Blessings to all,
Peter
When you find yourself in the company of a halfling and an ill-tempered Dragon, remember, you do not have to outrun the Dragon ...you just have to outrun the halfling.

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automaticforthepeople
GOLD Member since May 2003

automaticforthepeople

Obama supporter
Location: Boston, Mass

Total posts: 32
Posted:Here is information on where to purchase fire retardant sprays for natural and synthetic fabrics:

UK and Europe:
Try FireCheck spray, made in the UK
(see http://www.mslfirecheck.com . tel (+44)1524-844099)
They ship to most countries. It is fire retardant, and works on many synthetic and natural fibers

USA:
Or, if you're in the USA, try FlameX fireretardant spray
(see http://www.natfire.com/products.html , tel (+1) 815-634-8717)
-- call them and make sure to order the right spray, as they offer several kinds with different properties. Most of their fireretardant sprays work on many synthetic and natural fibers

Please note:

*Neither FireCheck nor FlameX makes fabrics fire proof. They are fire retardant sprays; they retard - but do not entirely prevent - fire.

*You must test the spray on the fiber(s) you are using. Different fibers give different results. If the fabric in question does not absorb liquid, there is little chance that the sprays will work.

*There is a possibility that the sprays will discolor the fabric(s) you are using. Again, try the sprays on a sample.

*Take 2 small samples of the fabric(s) in question. Burn one with a lighter. See what happens and how long it takes. Then, treat the other fabric with the spray, and do the same test, under the same conditions, with the same lighter. See if it works.

Spin safe, and be well.

Michael


"The storm it came up strong,
and shook the trees,
and blew away our fear."

-R.E.M. "Half a World Away"

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insanecircus
GOLD Member since Aug 2005

stranger
Location: melbourne, victoria

Total posts: 12
Posted:bunnings....... its called multi purpose fire retardant spray, got some there today $20

try not to think of gravity as a law, rather as one of many options

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