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melissa
BRONZE Member since Mar 2017

member
Location: madagascar

Total posts: 156
Posted:any tips for cutting kevlar fabric/cloth? i recently ordered (actually it was a quirky gift from my mom...
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) some of the 5 grm a yard kevlar fabric so i can experiment with some new torch designs. from what i have researched thus far it sounds like pain unless you buy really expensive kevlar shears (an even bigger pain) does anyone have experience cutting this fabric? i was thinking about sacrificing a pair of my sissors to the creative fire gods so that i could cut this kevlar. to prevent fraying does it help to trace the cut line with elmers glue (dry it before snipping) and masking tape? are there any other easily aquired cutting tools that i could use? has anyone tried using big sheet metal cutters or jewelry hand saws? tell me your experiences with kevlar!


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TheBovrilMonkey
SILVER Member since Sep 2001

TheBovrilMonkey

Liquid Cow
Location: High Wycombe, England

Total posts: 2629
Posted:I have a pair of scissors that came in a first aid kit and they can cut through kevlar really easily, they're the same ones that people in A&E departments use to cut clothing off injured people.------------------King of all things Walrus[This message has been edited by TheBovrilMonkey (edited 24 October 2001).]

But there's no sense crying over every mistake. You just keep on trying till you run out of cake.

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adamrice


adamrice

poo-bah
Location: Austin TX USA

Total posts: 1015
Posted:I do have some kevlar shears, but they weren't terribly expensive. I got them (along with a mess of other stuff) from Aircraft Spruce. I don't think you necessarily need fancy scissors for kevlar. Tinsnips would be very awkward, as would be a saw.I always draw my cut-line in ink and lay beads of Elmer's adjacent to it before cutting. It's an extra step, but I think it makes life easier in the long run.

Laugh while you can, monkey-boy

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vanize
SILVER Member since Aug 2001

vanize

Carpal \'Tunnel
Location: Austin, Texas

Total posts: 3899
Posted:I use a sharp knife and to hell with the frayed ends! Just remember that Kevlar has metal threads in it, so anything you cut it with is going to go dull pretty rapidly. So don't piss off your mother/father/wife/roomate/husband by using her/his sewing/hair-cutting/hobby scissors. Or if you do, don't fess up to it.[This message has been edited by vanize (edited 25 October 2001).]

-v-

Wiederstand ist Zwecklos!

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adamrice


adamrice

poo-bah
Location: Austin TX USA

Total posts: 1015
Posted:Kevlar does not necessarily have metal threads in it. I believe that the weave Dube sells has a stiffening wire in it; the stuff I use doesn't have any metal.

Laugh while you can, monkey-boy

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Posted:i find a stanly knife works best...frayed endsshould be tucked underX

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melissa
BRONZE Member since Mar 2017

member
Location: madagascar

Total posts: 156
Posted:thanks for the info.
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when it comes to working with kevlar i am a newbie, i've been using nothing but old towels for the past two year. i think i just try a pair of sissors and i'll look around for some of the first aid kind also. hey adam, how much did you get your shears for? when i look around it seemed like it was $60-150 dollar range (i didn't try the aerospace people though...) any other tips for preventing frayed ends? with what i am planning i have alot of surface area that is going to be cut. have any of you used any thing (like heat resistant apoxy, elmers, etc...)to seal the frayed end area? also with kevlar question, do you find that the wear and tear on your kevlar torches is due to misuse (like dropping on cement) or is a given from multipule times of lighting up? was the area of most wear centered around the metal that touches it or near the outer edges? basically i want to ensure if that if i put a ton of blood and sweat into my toys that they will last. i want to take the wear factor from fraying and frequent use into consideration before i make the final manefestation of my fire doodle ideas.
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Cantus
SILVER Member since Jul 2001

Cantus

Tantamount to fatuity
Location: Down the road

Total posts: 15965
Posted:I just use scissors. Nothing fancy. Just scissors. You should listen to adamrice tho. He's experienced in all this making stuff malarky...
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------------------C@ntus


"I'll carry this....It's harder to spill a hat" - Chellybean
"...like a rabbit caught in a lighthouse?" - Chellybean

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adamrice


adamrice

poo-bah
Location: Austin TX USA

Total posts: 1015
Posted:Melissa--I don't recall offhand, but my kevlar shears, which are not very fancy, probably cost about $20. You can probably get away with fabric shears or whatever.There's no question that just burning takes its toll on fire equipment, but abrasion can chew it up more quickly as well. People who like to do "fire-circle" starts chew up their wicks really quickly. All the wear I see is around edges and corners. Which doesn't make the equipment unusable, just unsightly. I've got two sets of wicks that each has at least 80 burns in them. I've been using them less and less, but I can still get a 5:30 burn out of them. I don't have any exposed cut-lines on my wicks (they're folded under). I use the Elmer's to avoid unravelling from the ends, and it seems to be effective for that purpose. But it won't prevent fraying (which can happen along any edge). I don't think you can practically fight fraying with glue or anything else. In theory, one could build a little frame out of angle-brackets around the wick, and that would prevent fraying, but would be a Really Bad Idea.Wicks don't last forever.

Laugh while you can, monkey-boy

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melissa
BRONZE Member since Mar 2017

member
Location: madagascar

Total posts: 156
Posted:thanks for the info,
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Ithaca


member
Location: Bath UK

Total posts: 45
Posted:I use a stanley knife...you can stop the weave threading by cutting a slit at each side of the kevlar where you want to cut it off and then cutting accross the middle.be niceIthaca

------------------
errrm I intend to live forever, or at least die trying.
Voltaire

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Charlie Fox
PLATINUM Member since Jun 2006

Charlie Fox

Burinating the village like Trogdor
Location: West Auck, NZ

Total posts: 156
Posted:I use aviation tin snips from Irwin, they are around the NZ$50 mark, i've tried dearer and cheaper ones but they don't work as well as the Irwins which cut it like paper leaving a perfect edge.

One of the advantages of being disorderly is that one is constantly making exciting discoveries.
- A.A. Milne

Don't join dangerous cults: Practice safe sects!
- Anon (I think)

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2Sharp


stranger


Total posts: 1
Posted:Hi, I am a college graduate and my job is engineering flame retardant and bullet resistant protective clothing for our military. We have government contracts and have several different styles and colors we manufacture. This includes sewing and cutting material with Kevlar using Nomex thread to sew them together. Kevlar (poly paraphenylene terephthalamide)is a polymer whose strength comes from it's many inter-chain hydrogen bonds which form between the carbonyl groups and NH (amide) centers. Kevlar does not have any metal in it, though it's not uncommon for manufacturers to add metal fibers to fabrics which also contain Kevlar as additional reinforcement. Cutting these fabrics can be a challenge and an ordinary fabric shear will quickly get dull, assuming it even cuts it in the first place? The fabric is slick, in that it wants to slide before it is cut. You need some scissors which are serrated or micro serrated on at least one blade to hold the fabric in place while the other blade makes the cut! The non-serrated side needs to be very sharp. The metal which the scissors are made out of, needs to be hard, high carbon, tempered steel or stainless steel so it will hold an edge for a while when cutting these fabrics. Some people have taken a pair of scissors and used a grinder to grind serrations into one side of the scissors so they would hold the fabric in place when making the cut. Another important thing is scissors which give you a good leverage advantage and are ergonomically/comfortable for your hand when cutting for an extended period. If the scissors your using are uncomfortable or don't fit your hand properly you will be sorry if you have to cut for an extended period of time? I always keep several pair of sharpened scissors at hand when cutting fabric with Kevlar in them. There are some good name brand scissors specifically for cutting these types of fabrics out there which work well. The prices for them are steep in some cases, but there are also some reasonably priced ones which still work quite well. I have some no name scissors which cut this stuff as well as some expensive name brand ones. Clauss, Kai and Wolff are the brands I am currently using for cutting these fabrics on the job. I have had some success with Westcott brand as well. Hope this helps! God Bless!

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Posted:I have one type scissors , it is WBT-1 electric scissors , maybe you can have a try .





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